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Full text of "Annual report"

SWAMPSCOTT PUBLIC LIBRARY 



Swampscott 

Massachusetts 




Annual Town Report 

July 1, 2009 to June 30, 2010 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/annualreport2009swam 



One Hundred and Fifty-Eighth 
Annual Report 
Of The Town Officers 



SWAMPSCOTT 
MASS A CHUSETTS 




For the period of July 1, 2009 thru June 30, 2010 



1 



2 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



Swanipscott was incorporated as a town 

Situated: 

Population: 

Area: 

Assessed Valuation: 
Tax Rate: 

Form of Government: 

Governor: 

Attorney General: 

Secretary of the Commonwealth: 

State Legislative Body: 

United States Congress: 

Governor's Council: 
Qualifications of Voters: 



Registration: 



Where to Vote: 



Tax Bills: 



on May 21, 1852 

About 15 miles northeast of Boston 

State Census 2000 - 14,412. Persons of all ages are counted 
every year in Town Census. 

3.5 square miles 

$2,298,779,232 

$16.48 Residential and Open Space 
$30.58 Commercial, Industrial, Personal 

Representative Town Meeting 

Elihu Thomson Administration Building 

22 Monument Avenue 

Swampscott, Massachusetts 1 907 

Deval Patrick 

Martha Coakley 

William Francis Galvin 

Representing Swampscott: 

Senator Thomas Magee of Lynn (3'^'^ Essex and Middlesex ) 
Representative Lori A. Ehrlich (8* Essex District) 

Senator Scott P. Brown 
Senator John Kerry 

Representative John Tiemey (6"^ Congressional District) 

Mary-Ellen Manning (5"^ District) 

Must be 1 8 years, bom in the United States or fiiUy 
naturalized in accordance with the provisions in Ch. 587, Acts 
of 1972 and CH. 853, Acts of 1973. There is no resident 
duration requirement for "who is a resident in the city or town 
where he claims the right to vote at the time he registers' may 
register. 

Monday through Thursday 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Friday 8:00 
a.m. to 12:00 p.m. These hours are subject to change. Special 
hours are help preceding and election. 

Precincts 1 and 2 -Senior Center, 200Rear Essex St 
Precincts 3 and 4 -First Congregational, Monument Avenue 
Precincts 5 and 6 - Swampscott Middle School, Forest Avenue 

Property Taxes are assessed 6n a fiscal year basis, which 
begins on July 1 and ends on June 30. Payments are due 
quarterly on August 1 , November 1 , February 1 and May 1 . 



3 



OFFICE 



TERM 



Swampscott 
Elected Officials 
2010 



MODERATOR 

Joseph Markarian, Jr 2011 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Robert Mazow 2011 

Jill Sullivan 2011 

Matthew W. Strauss 2012 

David S. Van Dam 2013 

Richard Malagrifa 2013 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

William C. Sullivan III 2011 

Linda L. Paster 2012 

Neil G. Sheehan 2013 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Maureen Thomsen 2011 

Glenn P Paster 2011 

Jacqueline Kinney 2012 

Jaren Landen 2013 

Laurier Beaupre 2013 

TRUSTEE OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Jonathan A Penyack 2011 

John Karwowski 2012 

Marianne McDermott 2013 

BOARD OF HEALTH 

Martha Dansdill 2011 

Nelson Kessler 2012 

Lawrence S Block MD 2013 

PLANNING BOARD 

Bruce E Paradise 2011 

Angela Ippolito 2012 

Sylvia B. Belkin 2013 

Patrick Jones 2014 

Jeffrey S Blonder 2015 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 

Albert DiLisio 2011 

Richard M. Callahan 2013 

James L. Hughes 2014 

Barbara Eldridge 2015 

CONSTABLE 

Robert Donnelly 2013 

Paul Minsky 2013 

Stephen B. Simmons 2013 



4 



SWAMPSCOTT DEMOCRATIC TOWN COMMITTEE 



OFFICERS 

Edwards, Ralph (Chair) 
Moynihan, John (Vice Chair) 
Spathanas, Laura Coppola (Vice Chair) 
Esteverena, Catherine (Clerk) 
lannaccone, Steve (Treasurer) 
Adams, Ryan (Outreach & AA) 

REGULAR MEMBERS 

Akim, Marta 
Archilla, Cesar 
Baker, Edythe* 
Baker, Robert* 
Bench, Clinton 
Blonder, Jeffrey* 
Boschetti, John 
DiPesa, Ralph (Skip)* 
Dreeben, Naomi 
Farber-Robertson, Anita 
Frenkel, Lenora 
Frenkel, Rich 
Jakious, Rick 
Jones, Carolyn 
Jones, William 
Kaufman, Iris 
Kaufman, Nancy 
Kearney, Sheila* 
Moss, Evan 
Mueller, Loretta 
Mulgay, Mark 
Patrikis, Ted* 
Peterson, Faith 
Peterson, Jim 
Pulos, Vicky 
Raiche, Susan 
Shutzer, Carole 
Smith, Abbe 
Smith, Jim* 
Somer, Margaret* 
Weiner, Frances 



ASSOCIATE MEMBERS 

Cormier, Kathy 
Dechillo, Mary 

5 



Driscoll, Tom* 
Kalman, Ed 
Rosenthal, Burt* 
Smullin, Mix* 
Thomsen, Maureen 
Watson, Brian* 
Weiss, Gerdy* 
* Lifetime 20 Year Members 



6 



SWAMPSCOTT REPUBLICAN TOWN COMMITTEE 



Aylouche 


Mounzer 


Baker 


Charles (Charlie) 


Bevis 


Judith (Judy) 


Brooks 


Ronald 


Burke 


Michael 


Campbell 


Michael 


DeBole 


Amber 


DeBole 


Paul 


DiPietro 


Ross 


Facella 


Mia 


Faeskorn 


Olaf 


Fanjoy 


Dianne 


Gindes 


Richard 


Hart 


Jill 


Keeter 


Theresa (Terri) 


Keeter 


Timothy (Tim) 


Kelleher 


Michael (Mike) 


Kelly 


Nancy 


Kozitza 


Kate 


Kramer 


Michael 


Minsky 


Paul 


Noonan 


Scott 


O'Donnell 


Frank 


Palleschi 


Edward (Ed) 


Porter 


Leah 


Ross 


Dorothy 


Ross 


Joseph (Joe) 


Schwartzman 


Michael 


Swanstrom 


Dana 


Tennant 


Alexander (Sandy) 


Tennant 


Cindy 


Tennant 


Cynthia 


Tibbetts 


Esther 


Willetts 


Jefferson (Jeff) 


With row 


Marysusan (Susan) 


With row 


Andrew 



7 



Withrow Robert (Bob) 

Chiarello Kenneth (Ken) 

McDonald Marnie 

Malagrifa Rich 



8 



Swampscott Town Hall 



V Floor 

Assessor's Office 781-596-8858 / Purchasing 781-596-8810 

All questions pertaining to the valuation of real and personal property 

All questions pertaining to personal property and real estate tax exemptions and abatements 

All questions regarding motor vehicle excise and boat excise/mooring valuation and abatements 

Tax maps and real and personal property field cards 

Senior work-off program 

Questions regarding the Town's pending and prospective procurement of goods and services 
Building Department 781-596-8857 

Permit issuance for: Building, Plumbing, Gas, Electrical, Mechanical and Sign 
Inspection & approval of work associated with these permits 

Questions pertaining to all applicable codes (ie: building & plumbing) and Zoning By-Law 

Assist with applications to the Planning Board, Zoning Board of Appeals and Conservation Commission 

Periodical inspections of all churches, schools, restaurants & multi-family buildings 

Clerk 791-596-8855 

Birth, Death & Marriage Records 

Business Certificates 

Census 

Dog Licenses 

Election Information 

Marriage Licenses 

Notary Public 

Street & Resident Directory 
Voter Registration 
Annual Report 

Collector's Office 781-596-8856 

Collection of Real Estate, Personal Property, Motor Vehicle Excise Tax and Boat Excise Tax 
Collection of Water/Sewer bills 
Questions on payments or amounts due 
Collection of departmental receipts 
Collection of Mooring Fees 

Treasurer's Office 781-596-8852 

Employee Insurance & Benefits 
Employee Payroll 

Payments or questions on bounced checks 
2"*^ Floor 

Health Department 781-596-8864 

All Trash & Recycling issues 
Animal Control 
Health Clinics 

Permits for food/restaurants, dumpsters, burial, summer camps, wells, rooming houses, pools & hot tubs, tanning 

booths, porta-potties, body art (tattoos) and building demolition 

Beach water testing 

Recreation Stickers 

Recreation sign-up sheets 

Senior work-off program scheduling 



9 



Conservation questions & information 

Abutter maps & labels for the Zoning Board of Appeals & Conservation Commission 

Personnel 781-596-8859 

Employee personnel records 

Records all injuries while on duty for all town employees 
Family Medical Leave Act questions 
Town Personnel policies 
Civil Service questions 

Board/Committee/Commission appointment notification 
Contract interpretation 
Hiring/available positions 
Liaison to the Personnel Board 
Liaison to the Ethics Commission 

Department of Public Works 781-596-8860 

Engineering 

Water/Sewer 

Cemetery 

Forestry 

Sidewalks 

Highway (street defects, potholes, paving, line painting etc.) 
Snow Removal/Sanding 

Streetlights (reporting of outages only contact National Grid for metal poles, DPW handles wooden poles) 

Signage (street, traffic, etc.) 

Lawn/leaf permits 

Boat trailer storage permits 

Beaches 

Traffic Signals 

Recreation 781-596-8854 

Winter & Summer recreation programs 
Issues field permits 

Selectmen/Town Administrator 781-596-8850 

Liquor licenses / One day liquor permits 

Class II Car Dealer licenses 

Entertainment licenses 

Common victualler's permit 

Block party applications 

Weights & measures 

Notary services 

Community channel request 

Floor 

Accounting781-596-8877 

Accounts payable 
Parking tickets 
Town Budget 
Town Audit 

Retirement 781-596-8827 

Retirement benefits 
Retiree investment questions 

10 



Return of notarized affidavits 
Notice of deaths to retiree or survivor 

Retiree check issues (changing banks, direct deposit, refunds, transfers, etc) 
Disabilities to retirees 

Planning Board and/or Zoning Board of Appeals 

Contact Helen Kennedy at: hkelken@verizon.net 



11 



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13 



SERVICE TO THE TOWN OF SWAMPSCOTT 



On behalf of the citizens of Swampscott, The Board of Selectmen and the Town Administrator 
would like to take this opportunity to express their appreciation to the many wonderful employees 
for their dedication and commitment in providing quality services to the Town, to wish those who 
have retired well in their future endeavors and to offer sincere condolences to the families and friends 
of those who have passed during the year. 



The Board and the Town Administrator would also like to express gratitude to those who have 
served and those who continue to serve on the various Boards, Committees and Commissions. The 
Board and the Town Administrator recognize the time and the effort that is given to Town service and 
wish to thank you for your knowledge, support and interest in the Town. 



FY 2009 Deceased Retirees 



IN MEMORIAM 



Helen Alex 09/10/1009 School Dept 

Robert Dewing 12/15/2009 Police Dept 

Michael Kehoe 07/08/2009 Police Dept 

Charles Losano 12/14/2009 Police Dept 



FY 2009 Retirees 



Biagio Charles Crescenzo 8/01/2009 School Dept 

Barbara F. Eldridge 9/10/2009 School Dept 

Charles Picariello 07/01/2009 Public Works 



14 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
TOWN ADMINISTRATOR 



The following pages contain excerpts fronn the approved minutes from each of the 
twenty-six (26) Selectmen's meetings held during Fiscal 2010. These minutes are not intended to 
provide the reader with a comprehensive list of all the business before the Board during FY10, 
but instead are intended to provide an overview of the issues addressed by the Board, and 
various votes taken by the Board, from July 1, 2009, through June 30, 2010. Unless othen/vise 
noted, all meetings were held in the Douglas F. Allen Meeting Room in Town Hall and began at 
7:30PM. 



During Fiscal 2010, the Board of Selectmen and the Town Administrator, along with a 
dedicated and professional staff, continued the process of managing the affairs of the Town 
during a continuing period of extreme fiscal uncertainty. We restate our commitment to work 
diligently on improving service delivery to residents and business owners of the Town of 
Swampscott. 



The Board and the Town Administrator would like to take this opportunity to express their 
sincere appreciation to all those individuals who have taken time away from their families and 
friends to serve on the many committees, commissions and boards that are the lifeblood of the 
town. The Board and the Town Administrator are grateful for the depth of experience and talent 
that each individual brings to these committees. We would also like to recognize Administrative 
Assistant, Maureen Shultz for her continued devotion to serving the public and assisting the Town 
Administrator and the Board. 



It is both an honor and a privilege to serve the Town as members of the Board of 
Selectmen and we appreciate the opportunity you have given each of us to do so. 



Respectfully submitted. 

The Swampscott Board of Selectmen 

Jill G. Sullivan, Chairman 
Robert E. Mazow, Vice Chairman 
Richard Malagrifa 
Matthew W. Strauss 
David S. Van Dam 

Andrew W. Maylor, Town Administrator 



15 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



Excerpts of Approved Minutes 
Tuesday, July 7, 2009 



Attendance: Chairman, Eric A. Walker , Vice Cliairman, Jill G. Sullivan, Selectmen Robert E. 
Mazow, Matthew W. Strauss, Anthony A. Scibelli and Acting Town Administrator, Dave 
Castellarin. 

Votes of the Board: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Mazow to approve the renewal of a 
Junk Dealers License for Frank Roberto/Roberto Associates, 10 Buena Vista Street, Swampscott, 
Mass seconded by Selectman Sullivan. 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion read by Selectman Sullivan to approve the MWRA 
Loan reimbursement seconded by Selectman Strauss. 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion Selectman Strauss to approve the FY09 Year End 
Shuffle seconded by Selectman Sullivan. 



Appointments: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to appoint Sylvia Carrado, Mary 
Doane Cassidy, Deborah Bogardus, Eleanor Didio and Shendel Bakas to the Andrews Chapel 
Committee seconded by Selectman Mazow. 



Town Administrator's Report 

Dave Castellarin, Acting Town Administrator spoke on the following: 
> FY2010 Budget 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
Excerpts of Approved Minutes 
Tuesday, July 21, 2009 

Attendance: Vice Chairman, Jill G. Sullivan Selectmen Robert E. Mazow, Anthony A. Scibelli , 
Matthew W. Strauss and Town Administrator, Andrew W. Maylor. 

Updates: 

Veterans Agent, Jim Schultz spoke on the recent War Memorial awarded to the Town. 
Public Hearing: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Strauss to open public hearing on a 
request from Silver Star Group, LLC regarding their Class II Car Dealers License seconded by 
Selectman Scibelli. 



16 



The Board voted 2-2 on a motion by Selectman Mazow regarding Silver Star Group, LLC Class II 
Car Dealers License to increase the numbers of vehicles to be sold from five (5) to thirteen (13) 
seconded by Selectman Strauss. Selectman Sullivan and Selectman Scibelli opposed the motion. 
The motion fails. 

The Board voted unanimously on a second motion by Selectman Sullivan to increase the number 
of vehicles for sale to no more than eight seconded by Selectman Scibelli. 

Votes of the Board: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Mazow to approve "Miles for Kyle Road 
Race to be held on October 4, 2009, pending approval from the Swampscott Police Department 
seconded by Selectman Strauss. 

The Board voted 3-1 in favor of approving Andrew Maylor, Town Administrator's contract 
extension on a motion by Selectman Strauss and seconded by Selectman Scibelli. Selectman 
Mazow opposed the motion. 

Appointments: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Scibelli to appoint Mark Ryan to the 
rank of Lieutenant for the Swampscott Fire Department seconded by Selectmen Strauss. 

Proclamation: 

Vice Chairman, Jill G.Sullivan read the Americans with Disabilities Act Proclamation. 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Mazow to approve the Americans with 
Disabilities Act Proclamation seconded by Selectman Mazow. 

Town Administrator's Report: 

Andrew W. Maylor, Town Administrator spoke on the following: 

> The Veterans Office recent relocation to the Senior Center. 

> The Retirement Board's recent relocation to Town Hall. 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
Excerpts of Approved Minutes 
Wednesday, July 15, 2009 

A meeting of the Board of Selectmen was held at the Swampscott Town Hall, 22 Monument 
Avenue, Swampscott, Mass. Chairman, Eric A. Walker opened the meeting at 9:00A.M. 

Attendance: Chairman, Eric A. Walker, Vice Chairman, Jill G. Sullivan and Selectman Anthony A. 
Scibelli 

Votes of the Board: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Scibelli to approve a one day liquor 
permit for the Clifton Improvement Association to be used on July 18, 2008, from 3-7PM for an 
event to be held at Preston Beach Park pending the following conditions: 

permit fee of $50.00 being paid, a Police detail be hired for the event, beer and wine only to be 
served by someone who has been certified in TIPS, seconded by Selectman Sullivan. 



17 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



Excerpts of Approved Minutes 
Tuesday, August 4, 2009 



Attendance: Chairman, Eric A. Walker, Vice Chairman, Jill G. Sullivan , Selectmen Robert E. 
Mazow, Anthony A. Scibelli , Matthew W. Strauss, and Town Administrator, Andrew W. Maylor. 

Open Discussion: 

The Board opened the floor for a discussion on the recent War Memorial donation to the Town. 

Angela Ippolito, Vice Chair of the Historical Commission spoke on their decision not to support 
the War Memorial being located in the Historical Olmsted District. 

Selectman Scibelli acknowledged the good intentions of Mr. & Mrs. Blain of Fireplace Mantels, 
Inc for donating this memorial to the Town. Selectman Scibelli feels the proposed location of the 
Monument Avenue area would not be the best location for this memorial. 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Scibelli to not allow the sculptor of the 
War Memorial to be placed on the Monument area seconded by Selectman Mazow. 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Scibelli to revoke acceptance of the 
War Memorial Sculptor which would allow the sculptor to be offered to another community 
seconded by Selectman Strauss. 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Scibelli to appoint a seven member 
committee to look into the future of a permanent War Memorial in the Town consisting of the 
members representing the Veterans Office, Historical Commission and a member of the Board of 
selectmen seconded by Selectman Strauss. 



Open Discussion: 

Marina Maylor, addressed the Board and requested support and permission to send out flyers to 
residents on behalf of her effort of her Girl Scout Gold Award Project in which she would like to 
re-paint the fire hydrants in Town .The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman 
Sullivan to approve this project to be done here in Town with their full support seconded by 
Selectman Scibelli. 



Public Hearing: 

The Board took a roll call vote 5-0 in favor on a motion by Selectman Scibelli to open the public 
hearing on the FY2010 Water and Sewer rates seconded by Selectmen Sullivan. 

The Board voted on a motion by Selectman Scibelli to approve the FY2010 Water Rate at $6.02 
and the Sewer Rate to $4.82 effective immediately seconded by Selectman Strauss. 



Votes of the Board: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to approve a request from the 
Lynn Area Chamber of Commerce to place a banner on the fence at the Swampscott High School 
to promote the annual Swampscott Home and Garden Show to be held on Saturday, October 24, 
2009, from 10AM until 4PM. banner to be placed ten (10) prior to the event which would be from 
October 14, 2009 through October 24, 2009, seconded by Selectman Mazow. 



18 



The Board voted on a vote 4-1 in favor on a motion by Selectman Mazow to approve the request 
from the Swampscott Yacht Club to alter their current Entertainment License for their clam and 
lobster event to take place on Friday, August 7, 2009, to allow music to end no later than 11PM 
seconded by Selectman Strauss. Chairman Walker recused himself from discussion and vote. 



Appointment : 

The Board voted on the recommendation by Andrew W. Maylor, Town Administrator on a motion 
by Selectman Strauss to appoint Dave Castellarin as Assistant Town Administrator seconded by 
Selectman Scibelli. 

Town Administrator's Report: 

Andrew W. Maylor, Town Administrator updated the Board on the following topics: 

> Boat ramp construction 

> Barriers at the Fish House beach area 

> Traffic signal update 

> Road way bid/ Essex Street towards the Mall 

> Design Firm/ Humphrey & Essex Street 

> Meals & Hotel tax 

> Town-wide System 

> Geographical Information System 

Selectmen's Time: 

Selectman Sullivan spoke on the War Memorial and wanted to assure our residents, veterans 
and family members of service men and women who are serving and who have lost their lives in 
service to our country that the Board's decision to not accept this memorial does not reflect their 
own feelings, the Board does not in any way shape or form want to dishonor or not remember 
them and or honor their services. 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
Excerpts of Approved Minutes 
Tuesday, August 18, 2009 



Attendance: Vice Chairman, Jill G. Sullivan, , Selectmen Robert E. Mazow, Anthony A. Scibelli, 
Matthew W. Strauss, and Assistant Town Administrator, Dave Castellarin 

Votes of the Board: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Mazow to approve a request from the 
Swampscott Arts Association to display two signs for their activities from Saturday, September 
19, 2009 through Friday, September 25, 2009, and from Saturday April 13, 2010 through Friday, 
April 9, 2010, seconded by Selectman Strauss. 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Scibelli to approve the annual renewal 
of a Junk Dealer's License for Phillips Clock Shop, 300 Essex Street, Swampscott, Mass to 
expire in July 2010, seconded by Selectman Mazow. 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Scibelli to approve the Swampscott Fire 
Truck lease seconded by Selectman Strauss. 



19 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Scibelli to approve the EOPSS 
(Executive Office of Public Safety and Security) Grant seconded by Selectman Mazow. 



Town Administrator's Report: 

Assistant Town Administrator, Dave Castellarin spoke on the following: 

> Recreation Department & Friends of Swampscott sailing- Lottery on Boat Sales to be 
held on Saturday August 22, 2009 , at the Pumping Station on Humphrey Street for six 
widgeon's and one whaler. 

Selectmen's Time: 

Selectman Strauss dedicated his time to speak on the recent passing of his friend Donald Leger. 
Selectman Strauss spoke on Mr. Legere's commitment and dedication to his family and the 
community. Selectman Strauss commented that Mr. Legere was always someone who gave 
back to the community, was past president of the Clarke School PTA, , volunteered at many 
community events including the cow plop bingo at the Clarke School and coached youth sports in 
Town. Selectman Strauss commented that Mr. Legere will be sadly missed but he will always be 
remembered. 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
Excerpts of Approved Minutes 
Tuesday, September 1, 2009 



Attendance: Chairman, Eric A. Walker, Vice Chairman, Jill G. Sullivan , Selectmen Robert E. 
Mazow, Anthony A. Scibelli, Mathew W. Strauss and Town Administrator, Andrew W. Maylor. 

Open session/ Discussion : 

Dave Castellarin, Assistant Town Administrator speaking on behalf of the Traffic Committee 
recommended a new fence at Phillips Park facing Charlotte, Muriel and Lodge Roads. Another 
recommendation that was briefly spoken on was installing Kiosks on Columbia Street to obtain 
parking fees from the train commuters. 



Appointments: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to appoint the following to the 
War Memorial Committee seconded by Selectman Mazow. 

> Eric Walker/ Board of Selectmen representative 

> Jim Schultz / Veterans Agent 

> Paul Levenson 

> Richard Smith 

> Jaclyn Raymond 

> Cindy Madfis Blonder 

Votes of the Board: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to approve a request from the 
Friends of the Swampscott Library to obtain a one day liquor permit to be used on October 2, 
2009 seconded by Selectman Mazow. 



20 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Scibelli to approve a Common 
Victuallers permit for Seaside Cafe, 128 Humphrey Street, Swampscott, Mass seconded by 
Selectman Sullivan. 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to approve a request from the 
Swampscott Police Department for the click it or ticket program & pedestrians enforcement 
campaigns to hang a banner starting for two ten day periods along the fence at Phillips Park and 
on the fence along Essex Street near the Swampscott High School seconded by Selectman 
Scibelli. 

Town Administrator's Report: 

Andrew W. Maylor, Town Administrator spoke on the following: 

> Poll changing location on next agenda 

> Special election to be held on January 19, 2010 & the Primary is to be held on December 
8, 2009. 

> Fire truck update. 

Selectmen's Time: 

Selectmen Scibelli spoke on a future discussion on a permitting process for Town residents who 
have their small boats at Fisherman's Beach such as Kayaks and Canoes so there is some way 
of keeping track of who owns these. Enforcement of dogs on the beach also was open for a 
future discussion. . 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
Excerpts of Approved Minutes 
Tuesday, September 15, 2009 

Attendance: Chairman, Eric A. Walker, Vice Chairman , Jill G. Sullivan, Selectmen Robert E. 
Mazow, Anthony A. Scibelli and Town Administrator, Andrew W. Maylor. 

Open Discussion: 

The Following were discussed briefly: 

> Sue Duplin, Town Clerk spoke on moving the polling location for Precincts 1 & Precincts 
2 from the Clark School to the Senior Center. 

> Andrew W. Maylor, Town Administrator spoke on the recent responses to Public Building 
re-use RFP"s. 

> One day liquor policy was moved to the next agenda. 

> Joe Markarian, Chairman of the Swampscott Police Building Committee updated the 
Board. 

Votes of the Board: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Scibelli to approve a request from 
Brian Salzer, Principal of the Swampscott High School to allow the art students to decorate the 
traffic signal box with a preliminary sketch be forwarded to the Board seconded by Selectman 
Mazow 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Mazow to approve a request from 
Attorney F. Robert Allison on behalf of Salem Five Bank regarding Fiory's Market, 357 Essex 
Street, Swampscott, Mass to pledge their liquor license seconded by Selectman Sullivan. 



21 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to approve the 
recommendation of Sue Duplin, Town Clerk on relocating the polling places for precincts 1 & 2 
from the Clarke School to the Senior Center seconded by Selectman Mazow. 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Scibelli to reject the single bid for 
Greenwood Avenue RFP seconded by Selectman Mazow. 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Scibelli to reject the single bid for 
Phillips Avenue Fire Station RFP seconded by Selectman Mazow. 



Town Administrator's Report: 

Andrew W. Maylor, Town Administrator spoke on the following: 

> Resurfacing of local streets to begin this week. 

> Changes to MGL 268A, Section 23 pertaining to Conflict of Interest law. 

> Joint green community grant. 

> Changes to civil services process was discussed. No votes were taken 
Selectmen's Time: 

Selectman Scibelli welcomed back resident Jeffrey Blonder from his service in Iraq. 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
Excerpts of Approved Minutes 
Tuesday, September 29, 2009 

Attendance: Chairman, Eric A. Walker, Vice Chairman , Jill G. Sullivan , Selectmen Robert E. 
Mazow, Anthony A. Scibelli, .Matthew W. Strauss, Robert E. Mazow and Town Administrator, 
Andrew W. Maylor. 

Open Discussion: 

The following updates were discussed: 

> Kevin Donaher & Chris Miles of the Jackson Park Playground Project updated the Board. 

> Members of the Board discussed future procedures regarding a policy for one day liquor 
license applications. 

> Gino Cresta, DPW Director updated the Board on road repaving and boat ramp 
reconstruction. 

Appointments: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to appoint Robert Serino as 
Laborer for the DPW and John Gillette as Mechanical Equipment Operator -Heavy for the DPW 
subject to the satisfactory completion of a pre-employment physical seconded by Selectman 
Mazow. 



Votes of the Board: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Mazow to approve a request from the 
Friends of the Swampscott Library to place their book sale sign on Town Hall green from 
September 30, 2009 through October 13, 2009 seconded by Selectman Sullivan. 



22 



Town Administrator's Report: 



Andrew W. Maylor, Town Administrator spoke on the following: 

> Vocational School merger. 

> ESCO update 

> Possible 9C State Aid cuts. 

> Draft warrant article pertaining to removal of Chiefs from Civil Service. 

> MSBA low interest loans. 

Selectmen's Time: 

Selectman Walker updated the Board on the recent meeting of the newly formed War Memorial 
Committee and their recommendation of suggesting people submit designs for for a war memorial 
with a deadline of Veterans Day. Selectman Walker spoke on the strategic meeting held recently 
and suggested that this is something that would benefit the Board if it is done on an annual basis. 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
Excerpts of Approved Minutes 
Tuesday, October 13, 2009 



Attendance: Vice Chairman, Jill G. Sullivan, Selectmen Robert E. Mazow , Matthew W. Strauss, 
Anthony A. Scibelli, and Town Administrator, Andrew W. Maylor. 

Discussion: 

An open discussion was held on the following items: 

> Dr. Lawrence Block, Chairman of the Board of Health spoke oh the PAY Program (Pay 
as You Throw). 

> Chairman of the Swampscott Police Building Study Committee, Joe Markarian updated 
the Board. 

> Vocational School merger. 

> Fire Captain Kevin Thompson spoke on the Swampscott Fire Fighters Memorial. 
Appointment: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Strauss to appoint Norma Freedman to 
the Council on Aging to fill the vacancy of Marion Stone until June 30, 2011, seconded by 
Selectman Scibelli. 



Votes of the Board: 

The Board voted on a motion by Selectman Scibelli to accept the Town Meeting Warrant 
seconded by Selectman Strauss. 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Scibelli to include dollar amount in the 
Town Warrant regarding Article 2, seconded by Selectman Mazow. 



23 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Mazow to accept a donation to the 
Swampscott Public Library in the amount of $1,000.00 from the Ritchie Family in memory of 
Frank Calamita, Jr seconded by Selectman Strauss. 



Town Administrator's Report: 

Andrew W. Maylor, Town Administrator spoke on the following: 

> Fire hydrant painting update. 

> Re-paving project update. 

> Grant / Wind Turbine update. 

> Financial Forecast to be held on November 16, 2009. 

Selectmen's Time: 

Selectman Scibelli requested that a discussion be added to the next agenda relating to small craft 
permitting proposals. 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
Excerpts of Approved Minutes 
Monday, October 27, 2009 

Attendance: Chairman, Eric A. Walker, Vice Chairman , Jill G. Sullivan, Selectmen Robert E. 
Mazow, Anthony A. Scibelli, Matthew W. Strauss, and Town Administrator, Andrew W. Maylor. 

Public Hearing: 

The Board voted on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to open public hearing on a request from 
National Grid request for the installation of one (1) (2) galvanized conduit from pole #132 to the 
handhold located on the property at 499 Atlantic Avenue, Swampscott, Mass seconded by 
Selectman Mazow. 

Selectman Scibelli recused himself from the public hearing and any vote. 

A representative from National Grid spoke on behalf of the above request. No one spoke against 
the request. 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectmen Strauss to close public hearing 
seconded by Selectman Strauss. 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to approve above request from 
National Grid seconded by Selectman Mazow. 

Open Session & Discussion: 

> GIS Geographic Information System was discussed / Vicky Masone, Town Engineer. 

> Tara Gallagher, Renewable Energy updated the Board on the Flex Building Code. 

> Small craft permitting process at Fisherman's Beach was openly discussed with 
comments from Selectmen Scibelli, Eugene Bardon, Milton Fistel and John Dipietro. 

> One day liquor permit was discussed with Board members, no action taken at this time. 



24 



Appointment: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to appoint Helen Kennedy as 
Board secretary to the Zoning Board of Appeals and Planning Board seconded by Selectman 
Scibelli. 



Votes of the Board: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to approve a new monument 
honoring four firefighters that were killed in the line of duty, William Pratt, Ralph Owens, Albert 
Lalime and Herve LeBlanc seconded by Selectman Mazow. 



Selectmen's Time: 

Selectman Mazow spoke on behalf of the Police Building Study Committee as a non- voting 
member regarding the amount that was recently given on the cost of a new police station and 
wanted the community to know this figure was not what the Police Study Committee was 
expecting and that the Board will continue to work and review every aspect of reducing the 
amount needed for a new Police Station and hopefully bring that figure to Town Meeting. 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
Excerpts of Approved Minutes 
Tuesday, November 10, 2009 



Attendance: Chairman, Eric A. Walker, Vice Chair ,Jill G. Sullivan , Selectmen Robert E. Mazow, 
Anthony A. Scibelli, , Matthew W. Strauss, and Town Administrator, Andrew W. Maylor. 

Open Discussion : 

Joe Markarian, Chairman to the Swampscott Police Building Committee updated the Board. 



Dave Castellarin, Assistant Town Administrator and Lt. Gary Lord, Swampscott Police 
Department recommended changes to Humphrey Street. (See votes of the Board) 



Votes of the Board: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Scibelli on the following 
recommendations from the Traffic Study Committee: 



> To remove the three (3) parking spaces in front of the Red Rock Bistro between the two 
(2) crosswalks within the intersection and replace with "Live Loading Zone", 

> Remove the two (2) parking spaces on Redington Street on Van's China Bistro side. 

> Restrict /enforce the non-marked parking space in front of Van's China Bistro due to 
being within twenty (20) feet of the intersection. 

> Enforce the bus stop just prior to Red Rock Bistro before the crosswalk. 

seconded by Selectman Sullivan. 



25 



Appointment: 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Strauss to approve the appointment of 
Wendy Frisch, 20 Mostyn Street, Swampscott, Mass to the Cultural Council seconded by 
Selectman Mazow 



Town Administrator's Report: 

Andrew W. Maylor, Town Administrator updated the Board on the following: 

> Budget update 

> Hospice of the North Shore Tree lighting ceremony. 
Selectmen's Time: 

Selectman Walker informed residents of the upcoming Veteran's Day event which will include the 
unveiling of the Desert Storm Monument. Selectman Walker commented positively on the recent 
paving of the streets in Town, and reminded all Town Meeting members on the upcoming Town 
Meeting. 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
Excerpts of Approved Minutes 
Tuesday, November 24, 2008 



Attendance: Chairman, Eric A. Walker, Vice Chairman , Jill G. Sullivan, Selectmen Robert E. 
Mazow, Anthony A. Scibelli, , Matthew W. Strauss, and Town Administrator, Andrew W. Maylor. 

Discussion: 

The Police Station debt exclusion was discussed by the Board. 

Selectman Mazow made a motion to put a special ballot question on the Town's special Election 
to be held on January 19, 2010, regarding the new Police Station seconded by Selectman 
Sullivan. 

Selectman Mazow made a motion to approve the ballot question to read as follows " Shall the 
Town of Swampscott be allowed to exempt from the provisions of proposition of two and a half, 
so-called , the amounts required to pay for the bond issued in order to pay costs of designing, 
developing and constructing a new Police Station on Town owned property located at 531 
Humphrey Street, Swampscott , and for the payment of all other costs incidental and related to 
thereto" seconded by Selectman Strauss. Selectman Scibelli opposed the motion. Motion passes 
4-1. 



Public Hearing: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to open public hearing on a 
request from 8 Asia Restaurant, 443A Paradise Road, Swampscott, Mass for an all alcohol liquor 
license seconded by Selectman Scibelli. A roll call vote was taken. 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Scibelli to continue the public hearing to 
the next scheduled meeting seconded by Selectman Strauss. 



26 



Town Administrator's Report: 



Andrew W. Maylor, Town Administrator spol<e on [he upcoming annual holiday parade to be held 
on December 18, 2009, which is sponsored by the Swampscott Police Association. 



Selectmen's Time: 

Selectman Scibelli informed the Board that he is on search committee to appoint a new School 
Superintendent. 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
Excerpts of Approved Minutes 
Tuesday, December 8, 2009 



Attendance: Chairman, Eric A. Walker, Vice Chair, Jill G.Sullivan, Selectmen Robert E. Mazow, 
Anthony A. Scibelli, Matthew W. Strauss and Town Administrator, Andrew W. Maylor. 

Open Discussion: 

A discussion took place on safe routes to school infrastructure / Stanley School. This discussion 
will continue on a future agenda after a meeting has been completed with abutting neighbors to 
this proposal. 

The Board discussed public services for One Salem Street. 



Public Hearing: 

The Board voted on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to open public hearing on a request for a 
section 12 all alcohol restaurant license from City Bar & Grill, LLC, 435 Paradise Road, 
Swampscott, Mass seconded by Selectman Scibelli. 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Scibelli to approve the application 
request for a section 12 all alcohol license for City Bar & Grill, 435 Paradise Road, Swampscott, 
Mass on the following conditions, alcohol to be served from 11am to midnight 7 days a week, 
anyone serving alcohol to be TIPS certified and alcohol license will reflect the special permit 
issued by the Zoning Board of Appeals with any changes that need apply, seconded by 
Selectman Sullivan. 



Public Hearing : 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Scibelli to open public hearing on all 
2010 renewals of all liquor licenses seconded by Selectman Sullivan. 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Scibelli to approve all 2010 renewal of 
liquor licenses in Town subject to all outstanding balances owed to the Town being paid, approval 
of the appropriate Department Heads, proper completion all paperwork, fire safety certificate 
being signed, and that all license holders except Liquor Stores are required to be in compliance 
with the Professional Alcohol Service Training Certificate program by March 1, 2010 , seconded 
by Selectman Strauss. 



27 



Public Hearing : 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Scibelli to open public hearing for 
Classification of Real and Property Tax with the Board of Assessors seconded by Selectman 
Sullivan. 

Chairman of the Board of Assessors, Neil Sheehan and Assistant Assessor , Donna Champagne 
O'Keefe discussed with the Board their report concerning the adoption of residential factor to 
determine the percentage of tax burden to be borne by each class of property for fiscal year 
2010. The Assistant Assessor and the Board of Assessors recommend a residential tax rate of 
$16.48 and a commercial, industrial and personal rate of $30.58. 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Scibelli to approve the recommendation 
to increase the tax rate as stated above seconded by Selectman Strauss. 



Public Hearing: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Mazow to open the continued public 
hearing from November 24, 2009, on a request from 8 Asia Restaurant, 443A Paradise Road, 
Swampscott, Mass for an all alcohol section 12 liquor license seconded by Selectman Scibelli. 

A brief discussion took place on a question from the audience regarding the process that took 
place on the application which needed to be re-addressed. 

The Board voted on a motion by Selectman Strauss to approve Section 12 all alcohol liquor 
license for 8 Asia Restaurant, 443A Paradise Road, Swampscott, Mass to serve alcohol seven 
days a week from 11am to midnight, all alcohol servers being certified in TIPS training and 
subject to the approval from the Zoning Board of Appeals seconded by Selectman Mazow. The 
vote was approved 4-1. Selectman Scibelli opposed the motion. 



Votes of the Board: 

The Board voted on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to approve an application for an 
Entertainment License from 8Asia Restaurant, 443A Paradise Road, Swampscott, Mass for a 
radio and CD music from 11AM to Midnight 7 days a week and cable TV until midnight, 
application is given on the condition that no live music and no live DJ be allowed seconded by 
Selectman Mazow. The voted was approved 4-1. Selectman Scibelli_opposed the motion. 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to approve the renewal of a 
brown bag license for 2010 for Cafe Paulina, 646 Humphrey Street seconded by Selectman 
Strauss. 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Scibelli to approve all 2010 renewals for 
Entertainment Licenses pending all fees owed to the Town being paid seconded by Selectman 
Mazow. 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to approve all 2010 renewals 
for Common Victuallers Licenses pending all fees owed to the Town being paid seconded by 
Selectman Scibelli. 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to approve the 2010 renewal of 
an Inn Holders Licenses for Captain Jack's, 235-237 Humphrey Street, Swampscott, Mass 
pending all fees owed to the Town being paid seconded by Selectman Mazow. 



28 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to approve an estimate of 
temporary increased resident population of the Town of Swampscott to be 13,672 as of July 1, 
2010 , under the authority contained in MGL Chapter 138, Section 17 for the purpose of 
establishing a quota for the Alcohol Beverage Control Commission seconded by Selectman 
Mazow. 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to approve a request from G 
Restaurant, 254-256 Humphrey Street to extend their liquor license hours from an 11PM to 
Midnight closing time seconded by Selectman Mazow. 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
Excerpts of Approved Minutes 
Tuesday, December 22, 2009 



Attendance: Vice Chairman, Jill G. Sullivan, Selectmen Matthew W. Strauss, Anthony A. Scibelli 
and Assistant Town Administrator, Dave Castellahn. 

Votes of the Board: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Scibelli to approve the renewal of Class 
II Car Dealers Licenses, seconded by Selectman Strauss. 



Selectmen's Time: 

The Board members wished everyone a happy holiday season. 



Selectman Strauss positively commented on the recent Holiday Parade that took place and 
recognized the Swampscott Police Department and all the volunteers for all their hard work and 
dedication. 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
Excerpts of Approved Minutes 
Tuesday, January 12, 2010 



Attendance: Chairman, Eric A. Walker, Vice Chairman , Jill G. Sullivan , Selectmen Robert E. 
Mazow, Anthony A. Scibelli , Matthew W. Strauss and Town Administrator, Andrew W. Maylor. 

Open Session / Discussion : 

Selectman Sullivan updated the Board on Town owned properties. Selectman Sullivan will 
contact the Town Building Oversight committee members to see what they think would be in the 
best interest of these properties during this economy and the market conditions. Selectman 
Sullivan will report back to Board at a future meeting. 



29 



Derek January, Vice President of tfie Swampscott Little League requested an approval from the 
Board to name the main walkway and throughway at the little league complex be named "Duratti- 
Holmes Way ". 

Andrew Maylor, Town Administrator suggested that Swampscott Little League return to a future 
meeting with a specific plan and design in mind on their request. 

Votes of the Board: 

The Board voted on a motion by Selectman Scibelli to accept date presented by Attorney Noah 
Rosmarin on behalf of his client Hawthorne by the Sea, to accept the one day liquor license 
suspension to be served on Friday, January 22, 2010, seconded by Selectman Sullivan. The 
vote was approved 4-1 . Selectman Mazow opposed the motion. 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Scibelli to approve a request from City 
Bar & Grill , 435 Paradise Street, Swampscott, Mass for an entertainment license on the 
following conditions; no disc jockey, no live music, music piped in through the restaurants stereo 
system, piano including one piano player and a television and the vote will include the hours of 
operation that will reflect the special permit issued from the Zoning Board of Appeals seconded 
by Selectman Strauss. 



Resignations: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Scibelli to accept resignation of Gene 
Bardon from the Planning Board effective January 12, 2010, seconded by Selectman Sullivan. 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Strauss to accept a resignation from 
Sheila Leahy from the Historical Commission seconded by Selectman Mazow. 



Appointment: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to appoint Milton Fistel to the 
Renewable Energy Committee seconded by Selectman Strauss. 



Town Administrator's Report: 

Andrew W. Maylor, Town Administrator updated the Board on the following: 

> 2010 Budget 

> Town wide communications system. 

> 2011 Budget update 

> Update on the sale of the surplus fire engine. 

> Meals tax discussion on next agenda. 

> Acknowledged Gene Bardon for his commitment of volunteering for thirty years to the 
Town. 

Selectmen's Time: 

Selectman Sullivan recognized Sheila Leahy and Gene Bardon on their years of volunteering. 
Selectman Sullivan commented about what a pleasure it was serving with Gene and that there 
are few people as passionate about Swampscott as Gene is. 



30 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
Excerpts of Approved Minutes 
Tuesday, January 26, 2010 



Attendance: Chairman, Eric A. Walker, Vice Chairman , Jill G. Sullivan , Selectmen Robert E. 
Mazow, Matthew W. Strauss, and Town Administrator, Andrew W. Maylor. 

Open Session & Discussion: 

Selectman Sullivan update the community on the Town owned properties and wanted to make 
sure that the community is aware that the Town is not purposely sitting on properties and the 
Town will make every effort to sell the properties. Selectman Sullivan informed the Board that the 
Town Building Study Committee will be meeting in the next couple of weeks and will come back 
to the Board with a recommendation at a future meeting. 



The meals tax was discussed. The following businesses were in attendance: 

Dunkin Donuts 

Red Rock Bistro 

Captains Pizza 

Tony Lenas Sandwhich Shop 

G Restaurant 

Paradise Restaurant 



No votes were taken during this discussion. 
Votes of the Board: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Mazow to approve meeting minutes 
from January 12, 2010, with the word " unanimously "be removed from the votes of the board 
regarding Hawthorne by the Sea's one day liquor suspension seconded by Selectman Sullivan . 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to approve Andrew Maylor's 
performance review seconded by Selectman Mazow. 



Town Administrator's Report: 

> Andrew W. Maylor, Town Administrator updated the Board on the following: 

> The Governor's Budget was discussed with the Board 

> Changes to the open meeting law were discussed. 



Selectman's Time: 

Selectman Walker spoke on his term as a Selectmen and expressed how much he has enjoyed 
his time working with everyone and being a member of the Board of Selectman and has decided 
after speaking with his family that he will run again for another term as a member of the Board of 
Selectman . Selectman Walker thanked everyone for their continued support. 



31 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
Excerpts of Approved Minutes 
Tuesday, February 9, 2010 



Attendance: Chairnnan, Eric A. Walker, Vice Chairman Jill G. Sullivan, Selectmen Robert E. 
Mazow, Matthew W. Strauss and Town Administrator, Andrew W. Maylor. 

Update: 

Traffic Laws & Enforcement were discussed. Dr. Eric Bachman discussed with the Board his 
concerns on pedestrian safety in Town. Chief Ronald Madigan and Lt. Gary Lord of the 
Swampscott Police Department spoke on the subject and gave some insight on their departments 
procedures of giving offenders warnings versus tickets. 



Traffic cameras were briefly discusses. It was noted that Town Meeting had not approved the 
cameras. Chief Madigan informed the Board and Dr. Bachman that the State Legislature is in the 
process of fine tuning the traffic cameras legislation at this time and that no other community in 
the State has implemented the cameras. 



Appointments: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to appoint Sheila Leahy to the 
Swampscott Historical Commission as an Associate Member seconded by Selectman Mazow 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Strauss to appoint Neal Duffy to the 
Renewable Energy Committee seconded by Selectman Sullivan. 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to appoint the law office of 
Collins, Loughran & Peloquin, P.C as Assistant Town Counsel through June 30, 2010, seconded 
by Selectman Strauss. 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Mazow to appoint the Law Offices of 
Anderson & Kreiger, P.C. as Assistant Town Counsel through June 30, 2010, seconded by 
Selectman Strauss. 

Town Administrator's Report: 

Andrew w. Maylor, Town Administrator spoke on the following: 

> Capital Improvement Plan update. 

> Interior changes to the Swampscott Yacht Club 

Selectmen's Time: 

Selectman Sullivan gave a brief update on the recent meeting of the Humphrey Street 
Revitalization Group and their discussion on the width of Humphrey Street which makes it difficult 
for pedestrian to cross. Selectman Sullivan also spoke on a grant to be used in the future for a 
pilot project between the Lynn line and Redington Street. 



32 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
Excerpts of Approved Minutes 
Tuesday, February 23, 2010 



Attendance: Chairman, Eric A. Walker, Vice Chair, Jill G. Sullivan , Selectmen Robert E. Mazow, 
Anthony A. Scibelli, Matthew W. Strauss, and Town Administrator, Andrew W. Maylor. 

Open Session & Discussion : 

Tara Gallagher, Chairman and Neil Duffy of the Renewable Energy Committee updated the 
Board on the work of the committee. 

Votes of the Board: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Scibelli to approve the Town 
Administrator's FY2011 Budget seconded by Selectman Sullivan. 

The Board voted 4-1 in favor on a motion by Selectman Sullivan on the recommendation of the 
Traffic Committee to approve the Pay By Space parking kiosk to be installed by May 1, 2010, at 
the entrance to the Train Station on Columbia Street by Selectman Strauss. Selectman Scibelli 
voted against the motion. 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan on the recommendation of the 
Traffic Committee to remove the bus stop located prior to the Red Rock restaurant and to add an 
add 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan on the recommendation of the 
Traffic Committee to move the bus stop located at 195 Humphrey Street back south 143 feet 
seconded by Selectman Mazow. 



Appointments: 

The Board voted on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to appoint Gene Bardon as a voting member 
of the Earth Removal Advisory Board seconded by Selectman Scibelli. 



Town Administrator's Report: 

Andrew W. Maylor, Town Administrator spoke on the following; 

> Energy Consumption Audit. 

> Draft Town Meeting Articles. 

Selectmen's Time: 

All members of the Board sent thoughts and prayers to the Phelan Family on the recent news 
regarding their daughter Erin, who was hit and struck by a vehicle in New York City. The Board 
sent their thoughts and prayers to the entire Phelan Family and assured them that the Board and 
the entire community are there for them. 



33 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
Excerpts of Approved Minutes 
Tuesday, March 09, 2010 



Attendance: Chairman, Eric A. Wall<er, Vice Chairnnan Jill G. Sullivan , Selectman Robert E. 
Mazow , Matthew W. Strauss, and Town Administrator, Andrew W. Maylor. 

Open Session & Discussion : 

A discussion took place on the parking kiosk on Columbia Street that was discussed at the 
previous Selectmen's meeting. 

Resident Jeanne Hayes spoke against the proposed kiosk parking meters for resident on 
Columbia Street who use the Train Station and commented that this would be unfair to target the 
working class pockets of the community. 

There were a few ideas discussed. No votes were taken and Selectman Scibelli was not present 
for this discussion, the Board suggested this be brought up a future meeting so that all Board 
members would be present. 

Selectman Sullivan updated the Board and the community on the Town owned buildings and 
informed the Board that they would be putting the Temple and the Fire Station/ Phillips Avenue 
back out to bid, but they are waiting for the Town Counsels opinion on the Greenwood Avenue 
property. 

Public Hearing: 

A public hearing took place on a request from Charlie Patsios to use the premises located at 460 
Humphrey Street, Swampscott, Mass, for a Class II Car Dealers License pending all paperwork 
being completed and fees to the Town being paid. 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan on the request of Attorney 
Martin Goldman to continue the public hearing to the next scheduled meeting on March 23, 2010, 
seconded by Selectman Mazow to give the applicant time to receive a copy of the special permit 
issued to the above address. 

Votes of the Board: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to open Town meeting Warrant 
seconded by Selectman Mazow. 

The Board spoke on the following: 

Selectman Strauss informed the Board that he feels that the time is not right to remove the Police 
Chief from the Civil Service list. Selectman Strauss feels that Article 4 should not have the Chief 
of Police and the Chief of the Fire Department in the same article, he believes that these two 
positions are completely different and should be separated. 



Selectman Sullivan asked the Board to give some thought on the possibility of changing the way 
Town Meeting starts regarding reports by Committees and Boards. Selectmen Sullivan had 
recently been spoken to on this subject during her office hours. Selectmen Sullivan commented 
that at the beginning of Town Meetings the audience is more energized and alert and that it would 
be positive to keep this momentum going with the possibility of proceeding with the articles at the 
very beginning. 



34 



The Board voted 3-1 in favor on a nnotion by Selectman Sullivan of approving the Town Meeting 
Warrant seconded by Selectman Mazow. Selectman Strauss opposed the motion. 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to close the Town Meeting 
Warrant seconded by Selectman Mazow. 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to accept a gift from the Laura 
Speranza Memorial Fund to the Swampscott Police Department for the Anonymous Texting Tip 
Line seconded by Selectman Mazow. 



Town Administrator's Report: 

Andrew W. Maylor, Town Administrator spoke on the following: 

> Budget update. 

> Local aid update. 

> Roadway pothole season update. 

Selectmen's Time: 

Selectman Strauss reached out to the community to see if there was anyone that would like to 
volunteer on a committee to organize the upcoming 4'^ of July events. Selectman Strauss 
thanked Maryann Hartman who has been organizing the 4"^ of July parade in Town for the past 
several years. 

Selectman Walker congratulated Andrew Maylor on his recent appointment as Chairman to the 
Essex Regional Retirement Board. 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
Excerpts of Approved Minutes 
Tuesday, March 23, 2010 

A meeting of the Board of Selectmen was held at the Swampscott Town Hall, 22 Monument 
Avenue, Swampscott, Mass. Chairman, Eric A. Walker opened the meeting at 7:30P.M. 

Attendance: Chairman, Eric A. Walker, Vice Chairman , Jill G. Sullivan, Selectmen, Matthew W. 
Strauss, Anthony A. Scibelli and Town Administrator, Andrew W. Maylor. 

Continued Public Hearing : 

The Board voted on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to open the continued public hearing from 
March 9, 2010, on a request from Charlie Patsios to use the premises located at 460 Humphrey 
Street for a Class II Car Dealers License seconded by Selectman Matthew Strauss. Selectman 
Scibelli recused himself from the public hearing due to him not being in attendance at the 
previous Board meeting on this request. . The Board members took a roll call vote. 

New & Old Business : 

Selectman Sullivan updated the Board on the Town Building Oversight Committee's proposal to 
remove a provision in the RFP of the Greenwood Avenue property in regards to maintain the 
older part of the building. 



35 



Discussion: 



Members of the Essex National Heritage Commission updated the Board on the eighty five mile 
byway route that travels through communities of Lynn, Swampscott, Marblehead, Salem, 
Manchester by the Sea, Beverly, Gloucester, Rockport, Essex, Ipswich, Rowley, Newbury and 
Newburyport. The commission is working to gain national recognition for this stretch of roadway. 

The Board spoke on the Town Meeting Warrant. 

Selectman Strauss commented on Article 4 which he is not in support of the removal of both 
Chief positions from Civil Service. 

Members of the Swampscott Police Department and the Swampscott Fire Department spoke on 
their support of keeping the Civil Service System in place. 

The Board took no action and will further discuss the Town Meeting warrant at the next scheduled 
meeting. 

Votes of the Board: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Scibelli to open the Town Meeting 
Warrant seconded by Selectman Strauss. 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Scibelli to close the Town Meeting 
Warrant seconded by Selectman Strauss. 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Scibelli to give Andrew Maylor, Town 
Administrator authority to begin the search to hire a consultant to determine the hiring procedures 
to hire a new Fire Chief which will not consist of a civil service written exam seconded by 
Selectman Sullivan. 



Town Administrator's Report : 

Andrew Maylor, Town Administrator spoke on the following: 

> Dog Bylaw Enforcement. . 

> Beach Improvements at Phillips Beach & Eisman's Beach. 

> TIPS-Compliance update. 

> Resident feedback forms. 

> Town Hall walkway-brick fundraiser. 

> Andrew's Chapel improvement updates. 

> Addition of a name to the Reserve Firefighter list for appointment was briefly discussed, 
with a name to be recommended at the next Selectmen's meeting. 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
Excerpts of Approved Minutes 
Tuesday, April 6, 2009 



Attendance: Chairman, Eric A. Walker , Vice Chairman Jill G. Sullivan, Selectman Robert E. 
Mazow, Anthony A. Scibelli , Matthew W. Strauss, and Town Administrator, Andrew W. Maylor. 

Open Session / Discussion: 

Mr. Rob Begin and Commodore Scott McBurney of the Swampscott Yacht club updated the 
Board on their plans for a King of Clubs Regatta to be held on Saturday, July 24, 2010 which 
includes the Nahant Dory Club and the Lynn Yacht Club. The Swampscott Yacht Club will return 
to a Board meeting with the appropriate paperwork for a one day liquor license and entertainment 
license, 



36 



Mr. Paul Levenson spoke on behalf of his wife, Sheryl Levenson a Town Ennployee, regarding the 
removal of procurement service to the City of Salem. 



Votes of the Board: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to open the 2010 Town 
Meeting Warrant seconded by Selectman Strauss. 

The Board discussed Article /regarding Civil Service for the Fire Chief and Police Chief positions. 

All members of the Board agreed to using an Assessment center in future hiring processes. 

A motion was made by Selectman Strauss to remove Article 7 in its entirety seconded by 
Selectman Sullivan. Selectman Walker and Selectman Scibelli oppose the motion. Motion passes 
3 to 2. 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Scibelli to close the 2010 Town Meeting 
Warrant seconded by Selectman Mazow. 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Scibelli to approve the 2010 Town 
Warrant seconded by Selectman Sullivan. 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Scibelli to approve meeting minutes 
with changes to the continued public hearing section regarding Selectman Scibelli not being in 
attendance seconded by Selectman Strauss. 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Strauss to approve a Common 
Victuallers license to Alio Alio Cafe, 242 Humphrey Street, Swampscott, Mass seconded by 
Selectman Sullivan. 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Scibelli to approve the Intermunicipal 
Agreement with the City of Salem for procurement services seconded by Selectman Sullivan. 



Appointment: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to appoint Christopher DiPietro, 
63 The Greenway, Swampscott, Mass to the Reserve Firefighters list of the Swampscott Fire 
Department pending a required passing of physical, medical exam and psychological exam which 
will be his appointed date seconded by Selectman Mazow. 

Town Administrator's Report: 

Andrew W. Maylor, Town Administrator spoke on the following topics: 

> Update on the status of TIPS certification regarding the Town's liquor licenses. 

> Update on the Swampscott Yacht Club construction of a deck. 

Selectmen's Time: 

Selectman Mazow informed Selectman Scibelli he would be missed. Selectman Mazow 
suggested that parents talk to their children and keep themselves informed of their kid's activities 
on face book and their texting in regards to the bullying that seems to be going on in every 
community. 

Selectman Scibelli thanked all of the members of the Board of Selectman along with the Town 
Administrator, Andrew Maylor and Maureen Shultz, Administrative Assistant. 



37 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
Excerpts of Approved Minutes 
Tuesday, May 3, 2010 

A meeting of the Board of Selectmen was held at the Swampscott High School, 200 Essex Street, 
Swampscott, Mass. Vice Chairman Jill G. Sullivan opened the meeting at 6:00P.M. 

Attendance: Vice Chairman, Jill G. Sullivan, Selectmen Richard Malagrifa, , Robert E. Mazov\/, 
Matthew W. Strauss, David S. Van Dam and Town Administrator, Andrew W. Maylor. 

Organizational Meeting: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Mazow to appoint Selectman Sullivan to 
Chairman to the Board of Selectman seconded by Selectman Strauss. 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Strauss to appoint Selectman Mazow to 
Vice Chairman to the Board of Selectman seconded by Selectman Van Dam. 

Discussion: 

A brief discussion took place regarding the reguest from the Swampscott Yacht Club for an 
Entertainment License and a one day liquor permit to be used on the King of Clubs Regatta to be 
held on July 24, 2010. 

Resident Mary Ellen Fletcher and Robert and Clara Grimes spoke against both requests. 
Votes of the Board: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Strauss to approve an Entertainment 
License which includes a live bluegrass band to play from 6-1 1PM for the Swampscott Yacht 
Club to be used for the King of Clubs Regatta to be held on July 24, 201 0, with the condition of an 
insurance binder is attached to the permit seconded by Selectman Mazow. 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Mazow to approve a one day liquor 
permit for the Swampscott Yacht Club to be used for the King of Clubs Regatta to be used on 
July 24, 2010 , subject to the following conditions, no drinking outside of tent area, police and 
private security detail be used, no more than 200 people in tent, time is from 6-1 0:30PM, wrist 
bands to keep track of guest drinking, any servers of alcohol need to be TIPS certified, seconded 
by Selectman Strauss. 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Mazow to approve request from the 
Swampscott Library, Swampscott Rotary and the Swampscott Yacht Club for permission to hold 
the annual Harbor Festival to take place on June 26, 2010, seconded by Selectman Strauss. 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Malagrifa to approve a walk, ride & walk 
for Tom Smith to be held on June 27, 2010, seconded by Selectman Mazow 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Van Dam to approve a request from the 
JCC of the North Shore to run their 10'^ annual Triathlon by the Sea event to be held on May 16, 
2010, seconded by Selectman Malagrifa. 

Appointments: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Mazow to appoint Geoffrey Boland to 
the position of Assistant Harbormaster until December 31 , 2010, seconded by Selectman Mazow. 

The Board voted on a motion by Selectman Strauss to appoint Melanie Peterson to the Historical 
Commission seconded by Selectman Malagrifa. 



38 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



Excerpts of Approved Minutes 
Tuesday, May 11,2010 



Attendance: Chairman, Jill G. Sullivan, Vice Chairman, Robert E. Mazow , Selectmen Richard 
Malagrifa, Matthew W. Strauss, David S. Van Dam and Town Administrator, Andrew W. Maylor. 

Open Discussion: 

Andrew Maylor, Town Administrator spoke on the Assessment Center RFP'S and made a 
recommendation to the Board to retain the services of MMA Consultants. 

Members of the Renewable Energy Committee updated the Board on Green Communities Act 
Status update. 

Open Discussion : 

Swampscott Club Commodore, William Sharpe spoke on behalf of the Swampscott Yacht Club 
and their proposal for an addition of a four foot extension to the south side of the Fish House to 
construct a porch. 

After a discussion the Board voted the following: 

The Board voted 4-1 in favor on a motion by Selectman Mazow on a request by the Swampscott 
Yacht Club for an addition of a four foot extension to the south side extension of the Fish House 
to construct a porch with the following conditions: no smoking which includes the inside of the 
building and on the deck, approval by the local Building Inspector ,approval of the Conservation 
Commission, modifications made to the their current entertainment license , liquor license and 
lease, modification and notice of length of construction from beginning to end seconded by 
Selectman Strauss. Selectman Malagrifa opposed the motion. 

Votes of the Board: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Strauss to approve the recommendation 
of Andrew Maylor, Town Administrator to hire the consulting firm of MMA Consultants for the 
Assessment Consultant seconded by Selectman Mazow. 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Mazow to accept a donation from 
William and Doris Bithell Trust Foundation to the Swampscott Public Library in the amount of 
$2,000.00, seconded by Selectman Strauss. 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Malagrifa to approve a donation from 
Joseph Cadiff Charitable Foundation to the Swampscott Police Department in the amount of 
$2,000.00 seconded by Selectman Van Dam. 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Strauss to approve a request from Joan 
Caradonna of the SPOT ( Swampscott Park for Off Leash Time ) dog park group to sell hot dogs 
at the Strawberry Festival pending approval from the Health Department seconded by Selectman 
Malagrifa. 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Sullivan to approve a request from the 
Swampscott Big Blue Football and the Gridiron Club to hold the Strawberry Festival on June 27, 
2010, on the Town Hall lawn seconded by Selectman Mazow. 



39 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Strauss to authorize the Town 
Administrator to execute an amendment to the 2006 Activity and Use Limitation placed on the 
Water Tower property on Plymouth Lane seconded by Selectman Malagrifa. 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Strauss on the recommendation of 
Andrew Mayor, Town Administrator to call for the list of names to be appointed to appoint a 
permanent firefighter seconded by Selectman Malagrifa. 



Town Administrator's Report: 

Andrew W. Maylor, Town Administrator spoke on the following: 

> Open Meeting Law changes. 

> Profit & loss regarding Harbor activities. 

Selectmen's Time : 

Selectman Strauss asked for anyone in the community that might be interested in running the 4'^ 
of July Parade to contact the Selectmen's office. Selectman Strauss reminded the community of 
the upcoming golf tournament to benefit the 4'*^ of July Fireworks. 



Selectman Mazow informed all residents that the Town has provided each Selectman with their 
own Town email and asked Andrew Maylor, Town Administrator to clarify that email. Selectman 
Mazow also reminded the community that all the Selectmen have phone number 's where they 
can contacted and if anyone needs to send any mail directly to a Board member they are 
welcome to send it in a sealed envelope to the Selectmen's office and it will forwarded to that 
Board member. 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
Excerpts of Approved Minutes 
Tuesday, May 25, 2010 



Attendance: Chairman, Jill G. Sullivan, , Selectmen Richard Malagrifa , Matthew W. Strauss, 
David S. Van Dam and Town Administrator, Andrew W. Maylor. 

Votes of the Board: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Strauss to approve Town Counsel 
Review of Regional Governance Document seconded by Selectman Van Dam. 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Strauss to approve a donation from the 
Swampscott Rotary Club in the amount of $200.00 to the Swampscott Public Library for the 
purchase of reading materials seconded by Selectman Van Dam. 

Appointments: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Strauss to approve the summer 
recreational positions seconded by Selectman Malagrifa. 



40 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Strauss on the recommendation from 
the Health Department to hire Nicole Sanphy as a Public Health Nurse on a per diem basis to 
cover a maternity leave through September 1, 2010, seconded by Selectman Malagrifa. 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Van Dam to appoint the Law Firm of 
Davis, Malm & D'Agostine, P.C. as Assistant Counsel seconded by Selectman Malagrifa. 



Town Administrator's Report: 

Andrew W. Maylor, Town Administrator updated the Board on the following: 

> Update of a recent meeting with the Mayor Judith Flanagan Kennedy the Mayor of the 
City of Lynn. 

> DRW vacancy. 

Selectmen's Time: 

Selectman Van Dam spoke on the 3"^ Annual Walk for Respect that was held recently in Town. 
Selectman Van Dam commented on the weather which was unique for this event and how there 
was many great people that attended. 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
Excerpts of Approved Minutes 
Tuesday, June 8, 2010 



Attendance: Chairman, Jill G Sullivan , Vice Chairman , Robert E. Mazow , Selectman Richard 
Malagrifa, Matthew W. Strauss, David Van Dam and Town Administrator, Andrew W. Maylor. 

Historical Preservation Awards: 

Members of the Historical Commission presented homeowners with the annual Historical 
Preservation awards. 

Discussion : 

The Board discussed an idea suggested by Selectman Malagrifa for a community event such as 
Carnival. Selectman Strauss spoke briefly on his thoughts regarding a community event such as 
a carnival and opposed the idea with his thoughts thinking that community events should be more 
on the idea of parades, concerts and movies in the park. Selectman Sullivan main concern was 
that of homes in the area of a possible carnival and how this would affect them with the lights and 
noise. Selectman Van Dam spoke on his thoughts on a carnival and was in agreement that it 
could be a great community event as long as the responsibility falls within the carnival company 
that they be the ones responsible for clean-up or damages. The Board requested Andrew Maylor, 
Town Administrator touch base with the owners of the Swampscott Mall to see what their 
thoughts would be on the subject. 



41 



Discussion: 



The Board discussed tlie future of a potential leaf blower regulation. Selectman Sullivan had 
recently heard from a concerned resident Mr. Steve Dwyer of Aspen Road regarding the noise 
levels in the summer time and the dust and or health concerns they may create. Resident Bill 
Whalen supported a ban on leaf blowers. Resident Martha Dansdill supported a ban on leaf 
blowers and updated the Board on potential health dangers such as noise, dust and pollution. Ms. 
Dansdill presented pictures to the Board of dust clouds coming from the use of leaf blowers. 
Resident Brian Watson suggested the Town adopt a general bylaw to ban leaf blowers from May 
15 through September 15'^ each year. The Board decided to bring the discussion back to a future 
agenda. 



Public Hearing : 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Malagrifa to open public hearing on a 
request from Aggregate Industries -Northeast region, Inc for earth Removal permit July 1, 2010 
through June 30, 201 1, seconded by Selectman Strauss. 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Strauss to approve the permit for 
Aggregate Industries-Northeast Division, Inc permit July 1, 2010 through June 30, 2010, 
seconded by Selectman Malagrifa. 



Votes of the Board: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Strauss to approve a request from the 
Swampscott Fire Department to close Burrill Street on Saturday, June 19, 2010, for the 
dedication and unveiling of the Firefighter's memorial seconded by Selectman Malagrifa. 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Strauss to approve a deed to transfer 
Town owned land located at the Tedesco Road, Marblehead, Mass seconded by Selectman 
Malagrifa. 

Appointments: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Malagrifa to appoint Dana Swanstrom 
of 61 Prospect Street, Swampscott, to the Harbor Advisory Committee through June 30, 2011, 
seconded by Selectman Van Dam. 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Malagrifa to appoint Milton Fistel of 330 
Humphrey Street, Swampscott, to the Harbor Advisory Committee through June 30, 2011 
seconded by Selectman Mazow. 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Strauss to appoint Sylvia Belkin to the 
Metropolitan Area Planning Board as a representative of Swampscott seconded by Selectman 
Mazow. 

Town Administrator's Report: 

Andrew W. Maylor, Town Administrator informed the Board that Representative Ehrlich's office 
had announced that the Town has been awarded a grant from the Massachusetts Clean Energy 
Center to study the feasibility of a wind turbine off Forest Avenue. 



42 



New & Old Business: 



Dave Castellarin, Town Accountant spoke on a follow up letter from the MBTA regarding the 
removal and relocation of bus stops on Humphrey Street. The Board was informed that the 
MBTA is requesting as part of this approval that the originally request wasjo take only one of 
the on street parking spaces, it now has informed the Town it needs to take the use of two 
parking to make sufficient length for the bus to use the stop. 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Mazow to agree to the above request 
contingent upon asking them to reconsider allowing us to keep one space seconded by 
Selectman Malagrifa. 



Selectmen's Time: 

Selectman Mazow recognized Dave Castellarin and Danielle Strauss for their organizing the 
recent Golf Tournament held in Town. 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
Excerpts of Approved Minutes 
Tuesday, June 22, 2010 

Attendance: Chairman, Jill G. Sullivan, Vice Chair, Robert E. Mazow, Selectmen Richard 
Malagrifa, David S. Van Dam and Town Administrator, Andrew W. Maylor. 

Open Session & Discussion: 

Update of the Towns roadway improvements was discussed. 
Votes of the Board: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Mazow to authorize the Town Treasurer 
to execute and deliver a State House Bond Anticipation Note in the amount of $1 ,1 30,000. 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Mazow to approve the Year End Shuffle 
as recommended by Dave Castellarin, Town Accountant seconded by Selectman Malagrifa. 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Malagrifa to approve an Eagle Scout 
Project for the upgrade of removal of graffiti, installation of flagpoles and flowers to the 
Swampscott World War Two Honor Roll Memorial requested from William Anthony Travascio 
seconded by Selectman Mazow. 



Appointments: 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Masow to appoint a DPW Laborer/ Paul 
Erickson, 395 Essex Street, Swampscott, Mass pending completion of CORI Certification and 
pre-employment physical seconded by Selectman Van Dam. 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Van Dam to appoint Christopher 
DiPietro, 63 The Greenway, Swampscott, Mass as a Swampscott Fire Fighter effective June 25, 
2010, on the recommendation of Chief Michael Champion seconded by Selectman Mazow. 



43 



The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Malagrifa to appoint Captain Kevin 
Thompson as provisional appointment as acting Fire Chief effective July 2, 2010, seconded by 
Selectman Mazow. 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Mazow to re-appoint the attached list of 
boards &committee members seconded by Selectman Malagrifa. 

The Board voted unanimously on a motion by Selectman Mazow to re-appoint the attached list of 
remunerated position seconded by Selectman Malagrifa. 

Town Administrator's Report: 

Andrew W. Maylor, Town Administrator spoke on the following: 

> Wind Energy Grant. 

> Road way repairs. 

> Updated the Board that the location of the Stop & Shop Mall would not be a viable 
location for a future carnival. 

Selectmen's Time: 

Selectman Van Dam commented on a recent conference he attended for new Selectman in 
Sturbridge, Mass and he thought it was very informative and it included a roundtable discussion. 



44 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT'S REPORT 



For the Fiscal Year Ending 2010 the Town of Swampscott had to comply with Governmental 
Accounting Standards Boards Statement 34 for fixed assets. The Town had an inventory done in 
June 2002 for all assets valued over $1,000 with the Town's threshold for GASB34 being $25,000. 
We were also required to operate Enterprise Funds for Water and Sewer. The Funds are now 
known as Proprietary Funds. 

The following is the Fiscal Year 2010-year end DRAFT Governmental Funds Balance Sheet, 
DRAFT Statement of Revenues, Expenditures and Changes in Fund Balances for Governmental 
Funds, DRAFT Statement of Revenues, Expenditures and Changes in Fund Balance (Budget and 
Actual) Governmental Funds, DRAFT Statement of Net Assets for Governmental Funds, DRAFT 
Statement of Net Assets for Proprietary Funds, DRAFT Statement of Revenue, Expenses and 
Changes in Net Assets for Proprietary Funds, DRAFT Statement of Fiduciary Net Assets and 
DRAFT Statement of Changes in Fiduciary Net Assets and the July 1 , 201 Free Cash Letter from 
the Department of Revenue. 



Respectfully Submitted, 

David Castellarin 
Town Accountant 



45 



GOVERNMENTAL FUNDS 
BALANCE SHEET 



JUNE 30, 2010 



ASSETS General 

Cash and cash equivalents $ 5,885,539 $ 

Receivables, net of allowance for uncollectible amounts: 

Real estate and personal property taxes 676,047 

Tax liens 820,760 

Motor vehicle and other excise taxes 118,280 

Departmental and other 37,975 

Intergovernmental - i-' -S 

Restricted assets: rj; 

^ Cash and cash equivalents: r. .vrrr. ;Trr.-:r. . ■tt.tt.t . t.t:: :7~.~:7 — ""S— 

TOTAL ASSETS $ 7,538.601 ^ ^:^$ 

LIABILITIES AND FUND BALANCES \ ""te. 

LIABILITIES: % 

Warrants payable 4 398,187 $ 

Accrued payroll % ' •''--='1235,344 

Tax refunds payable \ 262,721 

Other liabilities ^Ml^ % 311,733 

Deferred revenue .]?.' \ 1,532,016 

TOTAL LIABIUTIES 2,74a001 

FUND BALANCES: } 
Reserved for: ■■ ■-■-y^ - 

Encumbrances and continuing appropriations. .1-ri:,s'^ 823,309 

Debt service i.^. . f. . 699,834 

Perpetual permanent funds ^Pjg:? 

Other specific purposes .T;%!ivf _ - 

Unreserved: r " ?%:• ..^ ,. ' 

Designated for subsequent year's expaiditijg'es^Tl 200,000 

Undesignated, reported in: /j/ '"23-- 

General fund 3,075,457 

Special revenue funds.?:' ^igj,. 'if 

Capital projects funds-, , 

Permanent funds •' ">:-.^ S - 

TOTAL FUND BALANCES .-^ 4,798,6(X) 

TOTAL LIABILITIES AND FUND BALANCES $ 7,538,601 $ 



Stabilization Capital Articles 



655,149 $ 



-699,180- 



655,149 $ 



655,149 



655,149 



699,180 



31,586 



31,586 



667,594 



667,594 



655,149 $ 



699,180 



See notes to basic financial statements. 



Town of Swampscott, Massachusetts Basic Financial Statements 



46 



New High School 



Noranajor 
Governmental 
Funds 

1,275,288 $ 



Total 
Governmental 
Funds 

7,815,976 



_4aOQQ- 



483,282 

-580,993-- 



676,047 
820,760 
118,280 
37,975 
483,282 

-1320,173^ 



40,000 $ 



2339,563 $ 



11,272,493 



68,550 $ 
17,428 



498,323 
252,772 
262,721 
311,733 ..s 
1,532,016 1^" 



85,978 



40,000 



502,932 
940,468 



2,857,g65 
%B309 



:^"732,g5%.. 



^77311/ 



>%.502,93'2 

= I j^izoaooo 

3,075A57 
T 1388,023 
707,594 
77311 



40,000 


2,253,585 


8,414,928 


40,000 $ 


2339363 $ 


11,272,493 



Toum of Swampscott, Massachusetts Basic Financial Statements 



47 



GOVERNMENTAL FUNDS 
STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCES 



FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2010 



REVENUES 

Real estate and personal property taxes. 

Motor vehicle and other excise taxes 

Tax liens 

Payments in lieu of taxes 

Charges for services 

Intergovernmental 

Penalties and interest on taxes 

Licenses and permits 

Fines and forfeitxires 

Departmental and other 

Contributions 

Investment income 



TOTAL REVENUES. 



EXPENDITURES 
Current: 

Genei-al government 

Public safety 

Education 

Public works 

Health and human services 

Culture and recreation 

Pension benefits 

Employee benefits , 

Property and liability insurance 

State and covmty charges 

Debt service: 

F^ncipal 

Interest , 

TOTAL EXPENDITURES ^ 

EXCESS (DEFICIENCY) OF REVfivJIIE^. 
OVER EXPENDITURES. ..A- % 



^.....rSt 



AS,*. •••••• *»^C*> • • . • 



OTHER HNANaNG SOURCES (OSESf 

Transfers in 

Proceeds of bionds and notes 

Transfers out 



TOTAL OTHER FINANCING SOURCES (USES) . 

NET CHANGE IN FUND BALANCES 

FUND BALANCES AT BEGINNING OF YEAR 

FUND BALANCES AT END OF YEAR 



General 


Stabilization 


Capital Articles 


39,214,756 $ 
1,700,678 
526,279 
8,075 




$ 


9^15,23925^ 
267,522'°% 
1748^ 
8^l§82 

1,738,% 




- 


?nte. .29,215% 


6,858 






6,858 




1,408,911 
6,234,472 
22,808,791 

934,990 
1,199,392 

600363 
7,693,786 
3,896,967 

329,544 

995,786 


- 
- 


462,852 
29,822 
367,543 
410,547 

29,461 


3311,480 
1,402,455 












2,245,930 


6,858 


(1300,225) 


760,000 
(1,287,908) 


50,000 


18313 
920,000 


(527,908) 


50,000 


938313 


1,718,022 


56,858 


(361,912) 


3,080,578 


598,291 


1,029,506 


4,798,600 $ 


655,149 


$ 667,594 



See notes to basic financial statements. 



Town ofSwampscott, Massachusetts Basic Financial Statements 



48 



Nonmajor 
Governmental 
New High School Funds 



Total 
Governmental 
Fluids 



39,214,756 
1,700,678 
526,279 



- 


- 


8,075 


- 


1,136,035 


1,136,035 


1,025,930 


2,331,366 


12,672,535 


- 


- 


267,522 






175,853 


- 




86,582 




RR7 1 S6 




- 


29,068 


29,068 


- 


11,775 


47,848 


1,025,930 


4,395,400 


58,491,055 




70,476 


1,942,239 


- 


283,515 


6,547,809 




3,493,629 


26,669,963 


- 


391,454 


1,736,991 


- 


56,954 


1,256,346" 




229,604 


859)^28 






7,693,7l&n 






.3,896,967 


- 


- 








'SII548O 






"%ia,4(ii,455 










4,525,63%!'" 


%5€6,642,794 


1,025,930 


,4: (■13a232|; 


1,848,261 






828,313 






920,000 




(18,313) 


(1,306,221) 




(18,313) 


442,092 


1,025,930 


(148,545) 


2,290,353 


(985,930) 


2,402,130 


6,124,575 


40,000 $ 


2,253,585 $ 


8,414,928 



ToJtOTi of Swampscott, Massachusetts Basic Financial Statements 



49 



GENERAL FUND 

SCHEDULE OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCE 
BUDGET AND ACTUAL 

FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2010 



REVENUES 

Real estate and personal property taxes.. 

Motor veliicle and other excise taxes 

Tax and utility liens 

Payments in lieu of taxes 

IntergovenunentaJ 

Penalties and interest on taxes 

Licenses and permits 

Fines and forfeitures 

Departmenlal and other 

Investment income 



Prior Year 
Encumbrances 
and Continuing 
Appropriations 



TOTAL REVENUES.. 



EXPENDITURES 

Current; 

General government 

Public safety 

Education 

Public works 

Health and human services 

Culture and recreation 

Pension benefits 

Employee benefits 

Propert)' and liability insurance.. 

State and county charges 

Debt service: 

Principal 

Interest 



515^01 
36,418 

\ 2,300 

2,500 



TOTAL EXPENDITURES. , 



618,271 



EXCESS (DEFICIENCY) OF REVENUES 
OVER EXPENDITURES 



-.••fi.-" 



(618,271) 



OTHER HNANCING SOURCES (US^J!^./.. 

Transfers in J!'. .^5 

Transfers out ^ifi, 



TOTAL 0TH:ER FINANCINGSeUSCES (USES) _ 

NET CHANGE IN FUND BALANCE 

FUND BALANCE AT BEGINNING OF YEAR _ 

FUND BALANCE AT END OF YEAR $ 2304,643 



(618,271) 
2,922,914 









Original 


Appropriations 


Final 


Budget 


and Transfers 


Til 1 H ,rAf 

oucrgci 


39,986,436 $ 


- $ 


39,986,436 


1.84S,705 




1,848,705 


ft ft7t;l^-aj 




ft 07^ 


Tt,Z0O,7UO 




A 7QQ on*; 






17c ftAn 






186/101 


85,000:? 




Ann 








■- 37 500 




37,500 


48!l92.703 




48,192,703 


1,567,745 


90,857 


1,674,766 








22,994,091 




23,509^92 


1,010,977 


(103,938) 


943.457 




o,UCX> 


J, Z 117,04 I 


587,646 


4,700 


594,646 


3,372,226 


(14,000) 


3,358,226 




(99,954) 


*1, / AO, 1 


275 000 




275 000 


984,151 


- 


984,151 


3,668,446 




3,668,446 


1,756,753 


(100,000) 


1,656,753 


48,147 541 




48,765,812 


45,162 




(573,109) 


760,000 




760,000 


(1,150,162) 




(1,150,162) 


(390,162) 




(390,162) 


(345,000) 




(963,271) 


2,922,914 




2,922,914 


2,577,914 $ 


Z922,914 $ 


1,959,643 



See notes to required supplementary information. 



Town of Swampscott, Massachusetts • • Required Supplementaiy Information 



50 





Current Year 


Actual and 






Pnn 1 m hrarw P< 


EncurnbrancGS 


Variance 






and Continuing 


Positive / 


Actual 


Appropriations 


Appropriations 


(Negative) 


$ 39,922,148 


$ 


$ 39,922,148 5 


S (64,288) 


1,700,678 




1,700,678 


(148,027) 


526,279 




526,279 


526,279 


8,075 




8,075 




4,979,492 




4,979,492 


690,586 


267:571 




267,522 


92,522 


175,853 




175,853 


(10,248) 


86,582 




86,582 


1,582 


1,738,668 




1,738,668 


161,688 


29,215 




29,215 


(8,285) 


49,434,512 




49,434,512 


1,241,809 



1,581,140 
6,099,939 
2Z74930 

925,061 
1,196,756 

590,056 
3,358,039 
3,896,967 

329,544 

995,786 


19,108 
33,085 
757,013 
14,008 
95 


1,600,248 
6,133,024 
23,506343 

939,069 
1,196,851 

590,056 
3,358,039 
3,896,967 

329,544 

995,786 


74,518 i 

28,914 Ms, "'' 
3,249 \ 
4388 % 

4,590 % . \ 

,.,,i87 I M '' 

^54,544)"?;: 

"^■VTirix* 


3,311,480 
1,619,800 




3,311,480. 
I,619,8f0 


^J' 356,966 
36,953 


46,653,898 


823,309 


47,477,207'^ 


Ik 

1^,288,605 


2,780,614 


(823,309) 


li^7,3i05 


j 2,530,414 


760,000 
(1,287,908) 




76C0OO 
(1,287,908) 


(137,746) 


(527,908) 




■~ir..,-' (527,908) 


(137,746) 


2,252,706 


(823,309) 


1,429,397 


2,392,668 


2,922,914 


2,922,914 


2,922,914 




5,175,620 $ 


2,099,605 


% 4352311 


$ 2,392,668 



roivA of Stvampscott, Massachusetts 



Required Supplementary Information 



51 



STATEMENT OF NET ASSETS 

JUNE 30, 2010 



Primary Government 



Governmental 

ASSETS Activities 
Current assets: 

Cash and cash equivalents $ 7,815,977 

E?estricted cash and cash equivalents 1320,173 

Receivables, net of allowance for uncollectible amounts; 

Real estate and personal property taxes 676,047 

Tax and utility liens 820,760 

Motor vehicle and other excise taxes 118,280 

Water 

Sewer 

Departmental and other 37,975 

Intergovernmental 483,282;: 

Total current assets 11,272^ 

Noncuirent assets: % 

Receivables, net of allowance for uncollectible amounts: _ 

Intergoverrunental V^'^t.. - 

Capital assets not being depreciated \ aMS^ZTj 

Capital assets, net of accumulated depreciation ..-''-^i -'g-ai,. S&jjfo^^ 

Total noncurrenl assets „ i^922,480 

Total assets '" ^B4,194,974 



Business-typ>e 
Activities 

1,844,677 
519,613 



30^90 

%;315,223 
"""^^95,96^ 

156jfe80 

'Wl 62,647 



399,379 
252,182 
19,331,261 

19,982,822 

24,145,469 



Total 



9,660,654 
1,639,786 

676,047 
851,250 
118,280 
915,223 
695,964 
37,975 
639,962 



15,435,141 



399,379 
4^31,109 
87,974,814 

92.905,302 

108,340,443 



LIABIUmS 

Current liabilities: 

Warrants payable 

Accrued payroll 

Tax refunds payable 

Other liabilities. 

Accrued interest 

Capital lease obligations 

Workers' cocnpensalion claims 

Compensated absences 

Long-term bonds and notes payable. .. 



Total current liabilities. , 



Noncurrent liabilities: 

Capital lease obligations ^.S""."....!^* 

Workers' compensation claims r??^^ 

NetOPEBobligaUon ^;S^f^^..^^iif:... 

Compensated absences..." 

Long-term bonds and lietes payable. .?i 



Total noncurrent liabiSfies. . 
Total liabilities 



NET ASSETS 

Invested in capital assets, net of related debt.. 
Restricted for 

Capital purposes 

Debt service 

Permanent funds: 

Expendable 

Nonexpendable 

Other specific purposes 

Unrestricted 



Total net assets $ 



\ 498,323 


12,499 


510,822 


" 252,772 


17,752 


270334 


262,721 




262,721 


311,733 




311,733 


343,7% 


115446 


459,342 


67,082 




67,082 


125/)26 




125,026 


200,816 


516 


201332 


3,70Z695 


2,138,591 


5,841,286 


5,764,964 


i284,914 


8,049,878 


232,918 




232,918 


1,125,237 




1,125,237 


5,588,376 


92,773 


5,681,149 


1,807,347 


4,638 


1,811,985 


34,679,971 


6,781,002 


41,460,973 


43,433,849 


6,878,413 


50,312,262 


49,198,813 


9,163,327 


58,362,140 


34,978,993 


11,701,751 


46,680,744 




6i253 


62353 


699,834 




699,834 


77,311 




77311 


50i932 




502,932 


940,468 




940,468 


(2,203,377) 


3,218,138 


1,014,761 


34,996,161 S 


14,98il42 $ 


49,978303 



See notes to basic fiiwicial statements. 



Town ofSwmnpscott, Massachusetts 



Basic Financial Statements 



52 



PROPRIETARY FUNDS 
STATEMENT OF NET ASSETS 

JUNE 30, 2010 



Business-Type Activities - Enterprise Funds 



ASSETS Water Sewer Total 



Current assets: 










$ 1,]4«,967 $ 


695,710 $ 


1,844,677 






457,359 


519 613 


Receivables, net of allowance for uncollectible amounts: 








Water 


915,223 ^ 




915,223 






1P695,964 


695,964 




i^m.. 


12,115 


30,490 






156,680 


156,680 




2,ll4,819 


2,017,828 


4,162,647 


Noncurrent assets: 








Receivables, net of allowance for uncollectible amounts: 












399,379 


399,379 






249,640 


252,182 


Capital assets, net of accumulated depreciation 


} 5,305,636 


14,025,625 


19,331,261 






14,674,644 


19,982,822 


Total assets 


...J;'... j|i 7,452,997 


16,692,472 


24,145,469 


1 TARIT TTIFS -S' 








Current Liabilities; 


Vs.. 'a 










Z, 1 17 






9,830 


7,932 


17,762 


Accrued interest ??: .. /.^fet.,. . , . 


9,843 


105,703 


115,546 


Compensated absences •%!,:«'• • • • -^"^ii* 


Ji 439 


77 


516 




!t 725,432 


1,413,159 


2,138,591 






1,528,990 


2,284,914 


Noncmrent liabilities: 








Net OPEB obligation ,ji£vS%j!..!^^.,' 


53,467 


39,306 


92,773 






689 


4,638 






4,092,628 


6,781,002 






4,132,623 


6,878,413 






5,661,613 


9,163,327 


NET ASSETS 












9,745,125 


11,701,751 


Restricted for: 










62,253 




62,253 






1,285,734 


3,218,138 






11,030,859 $ 


14,982,142 



See notes to basic financial statements. 



Town of Swampscott, Massachusetts Basic Financial Statements 



53 



PROPRIETARY FUNDS 

STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENSES AND CHANGES IN NET ASSETS 

FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED jPUNE 30, 2010 



Business-Type Activities - Enterprise Funds 





Water 


Sewer 


Total 


OPERATING REVENUES 


3,208,800 
41,766 i 


2,189,056 $ 
29,819 


5,397,856 
71,585 


TOTAL OPERATING REVENUES 


3,250,56B=lo, 


2,218,875 


5,469,441 


OPERATING EXPENSES 


800,^69 
1,380^69 


803,744 

626,440 
527,533 


1,604,713 
1,380,309 
626,440 
720,366 


TOTAL OPERATING EXPENSES % 


"'-2,374,111 


1,957,717 


4,331,828 




876455 


261,158 


1,137,613 


NONOPERATING REVENUES (EXPENSES) \ 

Investment income /l^irM^, 4:-:l^-- 

Interest expense ?;f%, . M. .... 


53 

(51,793) 


204,684 
(281,210) 


204,684 
53 

(333,003) 


TOTAL NONOPERATING REVENUES (EXPENSES? 1^ 


(51,740) 


(76,526) 


(128,266) 


INCOME (LOSS) BEFORE TRANSFERSi,, .^.i:;T;%>j^^ 


824,715 


184,632 


1,009,347 


TRANSFERS ^/ 

Transfers out 


137,746 
(380,000) 


1,100,162 

(380,000) 


1,237,908 
(760,000) 


TOTAL TRANSFERS.. 


(242,254) 


720,162 


477,908 


CHANGE IN NET ASSETS::;?^, J 


582,461 


904,794 


1,487,255 


NET ASSETS AT BEGINNING OF YBAR 


3,368,822 


10,126,065 


13,494,887 


NET ASSETS AT END OF YEAR $ 


3,951,283 $ 


11,030,859 $ 


14,982,142 



See notes to basic financial statements. 



Town of Swampscott, Massachusetts Basic Financial Statements 



54 



FIDUCIARY FUNDS 
STATEMENT OF FIDUQ ARY NET ASSETS 



JUNE 30, 2010 



ASSETS 


Pension 
Trust Fund 
(As of 12/31/09) 


F*rivate 
Purpose 
Trust Funds 


Agency 
Funds 


Receivables, net of allowance for uncollectible amounts: 

T^oTia 1 1 n 1 on fra 1 an/1 nf"riOT* 


,,,, $ 516,248 $ 
27,256,963 
20 

.... ^jL,0\JQ - . . 


305,444 $ 


178,383 




27,79S;$39 


F 305,444 


178,383 


LIABILITIES 




8,451 


30,743 
147,640 




^^niM'.ii;; — ';. -L"' 'c't" — 
Tf. ^'"-^ 259,489 


8,451 


178,383 


NET ASSETS 

Held in trust for pension benefits and other purposes 


.... $\ 27,536350 $ 


296,993 $ 





See notes to basic financial statements. 



£ ^^^^ 



Town of Swampscott, Massachusetts 



Basic Fimncial Statetnents 



55 



FIDUaARY FUNDS 

STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN FIDUCIARY NET ASSETS 

FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2010 



ADDITIONS 

Contributions: 

Employer $ 

Employee 

Private donations 



Total contributions ', 

Net investment income: 

Net appreciation/ (depreciation) in fair value of investmentei-«j 
Interest I.... 

Total investment income (loss) 3;,; • • • • ^ 

Less investment expense 

Net investment income (loss) ;!: ..!'!^l|.,...^if^ 

Intergovernmental .rSssi'l' 

Transfers from other systems T/f 

TOTAL ADDITIONS .fi J^iv, . . 71: 



DEDUCTIONS ^. 

Administration 

Retirement benefits refunds. 

Transfers to other sysMitos 

Scholarshijjs awarded. . . 



TOTAL DEDUCTIONS 

CHANGE IN NET ASSETS 

NET ASSETS AT BEGINNING OF YEAR. 
NET ASSETS AT END OF YEAR 



Pension 


Private 


Trust Fund 


Purpose 


(As of 12/31/09) 


Trust Funds 


i '^72,928 $ 
l,6!|gS9 
I'^^ffic., ' - 6,925 


\^ 4,384,097 


6,925 


^ 3,061,786 




265,617 


1,668 


3,327,403 


1,668 


(215,166) 




3,112,237 


1,668 


133,169 


46,318 


7,675,821 


8,593 


159,968 




4,603,168 




443,835 






13,000 


5,206,971 


13,000 


2,468,850 


(4,407) 


25,067,500 


301,400 


27,536,350 


$ 296,993 



See notes to basic financial statements. 



Toum of Swdmpscottj Massachusetts 



Basic Financial Statements 



56 



Massachusetts Department of Revenue Division of Local Services 
Navjeet K Bal, Commissioner 

Robert G. Nunes, Deputy Commissioner & Director of Municipal Affairs 



Tuesday, September 28, 2010 

Dave Castellarin 

Accountant 

Town of Swampscott 



Re: NOTIFICATION OF FREE CASH APPROVAL - Swampscott 



Based upon the unaudited balance sheet submitted, I hereby certify that the amount of available funds or 
"free cash" as of July 1, 2010 for the Town of Swampscott is: 

General Fund $ 2,795,646 

Water Enterprise Enterprise Fund $ 720,447 
Sewer Enterprise Enterprise Fund $ 522,393 

This certification is in accordance with the provisions of G. L. Chapter 59, §23, as amended. 

Certification letters will be e-mailed to the mayor/manager, board of selectmen, prudential committee, 
finance director and treasurer immediately upon approval, provided an e-mail address is reported in DLS' 
Local Officials Directory. Please forward to other officials that you deem appropriate. 



Sincerely, 
Gerard D. Perry 
Director of Accounts 

This email and any files transmitted with it are confidential and 
intended solely for the use of the Individual or entity to whom they 
are addressed. If you have received this email in error please notify 
the system manager at postmaster at dor.state.ma.us. 



57 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 



Neil G. Sheehan, Chairman Pamela R. Hogan, Clerk 

Linda L. Paster, Secretary Sheryl Levenson, Clerk 

William Sullivan, III, Member 

Donna Champagne O'Keefe, Esq., M.A.A., Assistant Assessor 

In accordance with Article 4 Section 2 of the by-laws of the Town of Swampscott, the Board of 
Assessors herewith submits its annual report to the citizens of the Town of Swampscott for the Fiscal 
Year 2010. 

In Fiscal 2010, residential and commercial real estate values were adjusted based on market 
indications. Overall, residential real estate assessments decreased by 9.6% for Fiscal 2010 while 
commercial assessments decreased by 11.2%%. 

The Department of Revenue requires all real estate to reflect 100% of full and fair cash value 
every year. The Department of Revenue certifies compliance with the statute every three years. In 
Fiscal Year 2010, the Assessing Department conducted an interim year reassessment of values and 
received approval from the Department of Revenue. 

The town is required to physically measure and inspect all real estate within the community every 
ten years. Toward this end, the Assessors Department will continue conducting permit reviews and 
cyclical inspections. Since the accuracy of data is directly related to assessing the value of real and 
personal property equitably, the cooperation of Swampscott residents is strongly encouraged. These 
efforts help to ensure consistent distribution of the tax burden. 

The practice of interim year adjustments between recertification years has allowed the Board to 
maintain fair and defensible values at the Appellate Tax Board. This has resulted in a consistently 
positive overlay reserve that is then released to the surplus account. The total amount released to the 
surplus account by the Board since 1997 is $2,212,500. Beginning July 1, 2005 (FY 2006), the town has 
also been able to budget for significantly less overlay; the total overlay raised during FY 1999 through FY 
2005 was $2,363,739, or an average of $337,677 per year, compared to the total overlay raised during 
FY 2006 through FY 201 of $1 ,027,028, or an average of $205,406 per year. 

At the town-wide election in April, Mr. Neil G. Sheehan was re-elected to the Board of Assessors 
(BOA) for a three-year term. Subsequently, at a reorganizational meeting on June 24, 2010, the BOA 
voted unanimously to elect Ms. Paster as Secretary to the Board; and Mr. Sheehan as Chairman to the 
Board. 

The senior abatement/exemption work-off program is now in its 1 1"^ year and continues to benefit 
both the Town and its senior citizens. In Fiscal 2010, twenty-one (21) senior citizens performed voluntary 
work throughout the Town in exchange for an abatement of real estate taxes. The total amount of 
abatements/exemptions issued through the program for Fiscal 2010 was $12,715.50. 

In a joint meeting of the Board of Assessors and Board of Selectmen on December 8, 2009, the 
Board of Selectmen once again voted to maintain a split tax rate. The approved rates for Fiscal 2010 
were $16.48 per thousand for residential property and $30.58 per thousand for commercial, industrial, 
and personal property. 

Statutory personal exemptions/tax deferrals, which are mandatory under Chapter 59 MGL, totaled 
$81,125.01, and were given to 135 qualified homeowners. 



MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAX 

Number of Vehicles 1 3,506 
Excise Tax Commitment Total $1 ,759,607.99 

BOAT EXCISE 

Number of Vessels 171 
Excise Tax Commitment Total $7,597.00 



58 



The Board of Assessors wishes to express its appreciation to IVir. Andrew Maylor, Mr. David 
Castellarin, iVls. Susan Duplin, and Ms. Denise Dembl<oski for their cooperation and assistance 
throughout the year. 

The Board of Assessors herewith submits its figures used to determine the tax rate for Fiscal 
Year 2010. 

Respectfully, 



Neil G. Sheehan, Chairman 
Linda L. Paster, Secretary 
William Sullivan, III, Member 



59 



TOWN OF SWAMPSCOTT, FY 2010 LEVY LIMIT 



I. TO CALCULATE THE FY 2009 LEVY LIMIT 

A. FY 2008 Levy Limit 

Al. ADD Amended Fy 2008 Growtli 

B. ADD (lA + IA1)*2.5% 

C. ADD FY 2009 New Growtli 

D. ADD FY 2009 Override 

E. FY 2009 Subtotal 

F. FY 2009 Levy Ceiling 

II. TO CALCULATE THE FY 2010 LEVY LIMIT 

A. FY 2009 Levy Limit from I. 

Al. ADD Amended fy 2009 Growth 

B. ADD (IIA + IIA1)*2.5% 

C. ADD FY 2010 New Growth 

D. ADD FY 2010 Override 

E. ADD FY 2010 Subtotal 

F. FY 2010 Levy Ceiling 

III. TO CALCULATE THE FY 2010 
MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE LEVY 

A. FY 2010 Levy Limit from II. 

B. FY 2010 Debt Exclusion(s) 

C. FY 2010 Capital Expenditure Exclusion(s) 

D. FY 2010 Stabilization Fund Override 

E. FY 2010 Other Adjustment 

F. FY 2010 Water/Sewer 

G. FY 2010 Maximum Allowable Levy 



33,284,436 



832,111 



519,284 



34,635,831 



63,609,098 



j 34,635,831 

FY 2009 Levy Limit 



34.635,831 



865,896 



491,205 



35,992,932 
j 57,469,481 n.j 35,992,932 



FY 2010 Levy Limit 



35,992,932 



4,174,887 



40,167,819 



60 



BUILDING DEPARTMENT - FY 2010 



INSPECTOR OF BUILDINGS: 
ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT: 
LOCAL BUILDING INSPECTOR: 
PLUMBING/GAS INSPECTOR: 
ALTERNATE PLUMBING/GAS INSPECTOR: 
ELECTRICAL INSPECTOR: 
ALTERNATE ELECTRICAL INSPECTOR: 



J. ALAN HEZEKIAH 
LINDA PASTER 
VACANT 

PETER MCCARRISTON 
JEFF WALDMAN 
JIM SAMMS 
JOHN BARNES 



The Building Department interprets and enforces the Massachusetts State Building Code, 
Architectural Access Code, Plumbing and Gas Code, Massachusetts Electrical Code and the 
Town of Swampscott Zoning By-Laws in order to insure the public safety. 

The Department also reviews applications and issues permits, conducts field inspections 
and responds to the request for information and compliance, maintains property records, assists 
residents, contractors and others, and works with the town departments to help assure 
consistency, accuracy and access to information. 

Although fiscal Year 2010 saw yet another increase in number of permits issued as well 
as inspections performed, the decrease in value and revenue signaled a shift in the local 
economy. The department continues to upgrade general information hand-outs, as well as our 
website, to continually improve our ability to serve the community. 

The following information contains the Building Department activity for the fiscal year 
2010 (July 1, 2009-June 30, 2010). Total number of permits issued, fees collected and estimated 
construction costs are as follows: 

BUILDING DEPARTMENT STATISTICS FOR FY 2010 



Permits & Fees: 



Total # of Permits: 



Total $ of Fees: 



Total Const. Cost: 



Building 

Plumbing 

Gas 

Wiring 

Mechanical 

Overhanging Sign 

Certificate of Insp. 

Certificate of Occ. 



502 
344 
262 
350 
80 
18 
20 
37 



$121,367 
$15,047 
$12,340 
$19,887 
$4,500 
$1350 
$800 



$ 10,033,895.00 



TOTAL: 



1600 



$175,291 



$10,033,895.00 



Respectfully, 



J. Alan Hezekiah 
Inspector of Buildings 



61 



TOWN CLERK 



SUSAN J. DUPLIN 
CLERK 



OFFICIAL TOWN OF SWAMPSCOTT STATISTICS - 2010 

Zoning Board of Appeals filings: 35 

Site Plan Review Applications: 5 

Resignations of Town Officials: 19 

Certificates of Business (DBA) issued: 99 

Gas Storage (Flammables) Registrations: 14 

Dog Licenses issued: 1149 



2010 2009 2008 

Births Recorded: 119 123 154 

Deaths Recorded: 156 154 177 

Marriages Recorded: 53 45 47 



BOARD OF REGISTRARS 

Susan J. Duplin 

Sue Burgess 

Paul Debole 
Margaret Somer 



NOTE: 

By vote of Town Meeting, the annual report of all municipal departments now covers the fiscal year, July 1 
to June 30. Since many local, state and federal agencies require statistics for birth, death and marriages to 
be on a calendar year basis, January 1 to December 3 1 , we herewith present the last three calendar years to 
maintain the historical integrity and usefulness of this report. 



62 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

WILLIAM FRANCIS GALVIN 
SECRETARY OF THE COMMONWEALTH 



ss. 



To either of the Constables of the Town of SWAMPSCOTT 
GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, you are hereby required to notify and warn the inhabitants of 
Swampscott who are qualified to vote in the Special State Primaries to vote at 



Precinct 1 
Precinct 2 
Precinct 3 
Precinct 4 
Precinct 5 
Precinct 6 



Swampscott Senior Center 
Swampscott Senior Ceiiter 
First Church 
First Church 

Swampscott Middle School 
Swampscott Middle School 



200 Rear Essex Street 
200 Rear Essex Street 
40 Monument Avenue 
40 Monument Avenue 
207 Forest Avenue 
207 Forest Avenue 



on TUESDAY, THE EIGHTH OF DECEMBER, 2009, from 7:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M for the following 
purpose: 

To cast their votes in the Special State Primaries for the candidates of political parties for the 
following office: 

SENATOR IN CONGRESS FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your doings theron at the time and place of 
said voting. 



Given under our hands this (^^^ iay o f A^^^CY^j^^^^T^ , 




Selectmen of Swampscott 



Constable 



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64 



!:OLLECi!iiv;i,!;AMj^Ui< 



SWAMP 



MA 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 01907 

WILLIAM FRANCIS GALVIN 
SECRETARY OF THE COMMONWEALTH 2OIO JAN - M P i2: I 8 



ss. 



To either of the Constables of the Town of SWAMPSCOTT 
GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, you are hereby required to notify and warn the inhabitants of 
Swampscott who are qualified to vote in the Special State Election to vote at 



Precinct 1 
Precinct 2 
Precinct 3 
Precinct 4 
Precinct 5 
Precinct 6 



Swampscott Senior Center 
Swampscott Senior Center 
First Church 
First Church 

Swampscott Middle School 
Swampscott Middle School 



200 Rear Essex Street 
200 Rear Essex Street 
40 Monument Avenue 
40 Monument Avenue 
207 Forest Avenue 
207 Forest Avenue 



on TUESDAY, THE NINETEENTH DAY OF JANUARY, 2010, from 7:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M for the 
following purpose: 

To cast their votes in the Special State Election for the candidates for the following office: 

SENATOR IN CONGRESS FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your doings theron at the time and place of 
said voting. 



Given under our hands thi 



^-^g^ day o i}^y0PMl0£^ 




Selectmen of Swampscott 



2010 



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66 




WARRANT 
TOWN OF SWAMPSCOTT 
SPECIAL TOWN ELECTION 



JANUARY 19, 2010 



ss. 



To either of the Constables of the Town of SWAMPSCOTT 



GREETING: 



In the name of the Commonwealth, you are hereby required to notify and wam the inhabitants of 
Swampscott who are qualified to vote in the Special Town Election to vote at 



Precinct 1 
Precinct 2 
Precinct 3 
Precinct 4 
Precinct 5 
Precinct 6 



Swampscott Senior Center 
Swampscott Senior Center 
First Church 
First Church 

Swampscott Middle School 
Swampscott Middle School 



200 Rear Essex Street 
200 Rear Essex Street 
40 Monument Avenue 
40 Monument Avenue 
207 Forest Avenue 
207 Forest Avenue 



on TUESDAY, THE NINETEENTH DAY OF JANUARY, 2010, from 7:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M for the 
following piupose: 



To cast their vote on the following question. 



"Shall the Town of Swampscott be allowed to exempt from the provisions of proposition 
two and one-half, so-called, the amounts required to pay for the bond issued in order to 
pay costs of designing, developing and constructing a new police station on Town-owned 
property located at 531 Humphrey Street, Swampscott, and for the payment of all other 
costs incidental and related thereto?" 



Hereof fail not and make due retum of the Warrant, with your doings theron, to the Town Clerk at the time 
and place of the meeting aforesaid. 



Given under our hands thi; 



^rrl. day of ^l)mmhPXp UD ^ 






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68 



The Town of Swampscott 
Town Election Warrant 
April 27, 2010 



ss. 



To either of the constables of the Town of Swampscott 



GREETINGS: 



In the name of the Commonweahh you are hereby required to notify and warn the inhabitants of 
said town who are qualified to vote in elections and town affairs to vote at: 



Precinct 1 
Precinct 2 
Precinct 3 
Precinct 4 
Precinct 5 
Precinct 6 



Swampscott Senior Center 
Swampscott Senior Center 
First Church Congregational 
First Church Congregational 
Swampscott Middle School 
Swampscott Middle School 



200 Rear Essex Street 
200 Rear Essex Street 
Monument Avenue 
Monument Avenue 
Forest Avenue 
Forest Avenue 



on Tuesday, the twenty-seventh day of April 2010, 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. for the following purpose: 
To choose a Moderator for one ( 1 ) year 

To choose two (2) members for the Board of Selectmen for three (3) years 

To choose a member for the Board of Assessors for three (3) years 

To choose two (2) members for the School Committee for three (3) years 

To choose a member for the Trustees of the Public Library for three (3) years 

To choose a member for the Board of Health for three (3) years 

To choose a member for the Planning Board for five (5) years 

To choose a member for the Planning Board for three (3) years 

To choose a member for the Housing Authority for five (5) years 

To choose three (3) members for Constable for three (3) years 

To choose Town Meeting Members in each of the six (6) precincts filling any three (3) year vacant seats 
with the highest vote getters, filling any two (2) year vacant seats with the next highest vote getters, and 
filling any one (1) year vacant seats with the next highest vote getters. 



At the close of the election the meeting will adjourn to Monday, May 3, 2010 at 7:15 p.m. at 
Swampscott High School, 200 Essex Street, Swampscott, MA. 




69 



Annual Town Election 
April 27, 2010 



APRIL 27, 2010 LOCAL ELECTION 
Total Registered Voters 1917 1386 1654 1731 1741 1832 10,261 

18% Voter Turnout Prec.1 Prec.2 Prec.3 Prec.4 Prec.5 Prec.6 Totals - 



MODERATOR 
















Blanks 


98 


75 


92 


142 


125 


118 


650 


JOSEPH MARKARIAN, JR 


175 


170 


169 


241 


216 


228 


1199 


Write-ins/All Others 


1 


4 


2 


5 


4 


3 


19 . 


Total 


274 


249 


263 


388 


345 


349 


^ 1868 - 


BOARD OFSELECTMEN 
















Blanks 


104 


70 


75 


77 


95 


123 


' 544 


SUSAN M. RAICHE 


59 


48 


52 


100 


77 


36 


372 


REID J. CASSIDY 


82 


74 


90 


100 


72 


101 


- 519 


DAVID S. VAN DAM 


111 


101 


124 


181 


187 


186 


890 


RICHARD MALAGRIFA 


119 


115 


105 


181 


137 


103 


760 


ERIC A. WALKER 


72 


87 


78 


134 


122 


149 


642 


Write-ins/All Others 


1 


3 


2 


3 








9 


Total 


548 


498 


526 


776 


690 


698 


3736 


BOARD O^ASSESSORS 
















Blanks 


103 


82 


85 


153 


144 


152 


. 719 


NEIL G. SHEEHAN 


171 


164 


178 


233 


198 


196 


1140 


Write-ins/All Others 





3 





2 


3 


1 


9 


Total 


274 


249 


263 


388 


345 


349 


1868 


SCHOOIfCOMMITTEE^ 
















Blanks 


245 


197 


230 


359 


336 


317 


1684 


JAREN LANDEN 


157 


157 


156 


212 


173 


181 


1036 


LAURIER BEAUPRE 


144 


142 


138 


203 


177 


198 


1002 


Write-ins/All Others 


2 


2 


2 


2 


4 


2 


14 


Total 


548 


498 


526 


776 


690 


698 


3736 


LIBRARy#TRUSTEt^^^PM^ 
















Blanks 


106 


85 


98 


147 


132 


117 


685 • 


MARIANNE MCDERMOTT 


167 


164 


165 


240 


212 


232 


1180 


Write-ins/All Others 


1 








1 


1 





3 


Total 


274 


249 


263 


388 


345 


349 


=?pA1868f,' 



A TRUE copy 
ATTEST; 




SutanJ.Ouplfn 
Town Clerk, Swampscott 



OFFICIAL ELECTION RESULTS 

70 



Annual Town Election 
April 27, 2010 



Total Registered Voters 1917 1386 1654 1731 1741 1832 10,261 

18% Voter Turnout Prec.1 Prec.2 Prec.3 Prec.4 Prec.5 Prec.6 Totals 



BOARD OF HEALTH 












... - .... 




Blanks 


97 


87 


93 


149 


133 


119 


678 


LAWRENCE S. BLOCK 


177 


161 


170 


237 


210 


228 


1183 


Write-lns/AII Others 





1 





2 


2 


2 


7 


Total 


274 


249 


263 


388 


345 


349 


•; 1863 


PLANNING B0ARD-5YR , - , 
















Blanks 


109 


94 


101 


169 


153 


145 


771 


JEFFREY S. BLONDER 


165 


154 


160 


216 


188 


202 


1085 


Write-ins/All Others 





1 


2 


3 


4 


2 


A2 


Total 


274 


249 


263 


388 


345 


349 


1868 


RtANNINGBOARD-3 YR - 
















Blanks 


45 


25 


32 


53 


42 


34 


231 


JORGE A. BRIONES, JR. 


39 


25 


45 


38 


27 


18 


192 


SYLVIA B. BELKIN 


103 


72 


76 


169 


153 


178 


751 


DANA SWANSTROM 


87 


126 


110 


127 


123 


119 


692 


Write-ins/All Others 





1 





1 








\.^2::: 


Total 


274 


249 


263 


388 


345 


349 


1868 


HOUSING AUTHORITY 
















Blanks 


56 


54 


52 


98 


81 


97 


438 


BARBARA ELDRIDGE 


141 


140 


160 


205 


159 


131 


936 


GERALD (JERRY) SNEIRSON 


77 


54 


51 


84 


105 


121 


492 


Write-ins/All Others 





1 





1 










Total 


274 


249 


263 


388 


345 


349 


18681^4, 


CONSTABLEI*.- 
















Blanks 


378 


315 


361 


555 


514 


521 


. 2644 


STEPHEN B. SIMMONS 


140 


139 


137 


192 


163 


166 


937 


ROBERT DONNELLY 


145 


143 


144 


199 


169 


172 


972 


PAUL MINSKY 


159 


147 


147 


215 


189 


188 


1045 . 


Write-ins/All Others 





3 





3 








-:'6-'-^:5i 


Total 


822 


747 


789 


1164 |1035 


1047 


5604 



OFFICIAL ELECTION RESULTS 
71 



Annual Town Election 
April 27, 2010 





PRFCINGT1 


TOWN MEETING MEMBERS' 






VOTE FOR NOT MORE THAN 1R 






Ol dl )l\o 


« 


1 1 \i 


M^risnno ^noranya l-larfiYiann 
ividlldllllc opcldll^d ndlllllallll 


* 


164 


ThGodor© A. P3trikis 


* 


153 


V_rdlUIC fxi^^u 


* 


145 


Eric J. Hsrtmsnn 


* 


140 


Norms H. Rooks 


* 


139 


Sus3n Buch3n3n 


* 


135 


Rhod3 Mors6 


* 


133 


Dougl3s Whittier 


* 


126 


Robert Ch3vez 


* 


8 ■■■■■■ 


Ids Furnsri 






Stell3 King 


* 


3 


Kenneth Wsshburn 


* 




Nancy Harrington 


* 


2- 


Thomas Rogers 


* 




Francis Delano III 


* 


\ ■ - 


Steve Harris 






Charles Dolsn 




\ 


Nicholas DeFelice 






Write-ins/All Others 




4932 


Total 






PRECINCT 2 


TOWN MEETING MEMBERS 






VOTE FOR NOT MORE THAN 18 




2893 


Blanks 


* 


140 


Dsna Swsnstrom 


* 


136 


Matthew W. Strauss 


* 


121 


Anthony A. Scibelli 




121 


Don Pinkerton 


* 


117 


Jackson Schultz 


* 


114 


Lorene Jsckson 


* 


109 


Michael M. Pitman 




108 


Judith F. Dunn 


* 


104 


Mark R. Caron 




103 


Janet Hebert 




101 


William Jackson 


* 


97 


David E. Richmond 


* 


94 


Gail Rosenberg 


* 


93 


Patricia Karamas Raimstine 


* 


5 ■ ■ . 


Robert Bell 




3 


Jaren Richmond 


* 




Gregory Ramstine 


* 


2 


Edvi/ard Dion 




19 


Write-Ins/All Others 




4482 


Total 



OFFICIAL ELECTION RESULTS 

72 



Annual Town Election 
April 27, 2010 





PRECINClF3^^i^^ 


TOWN MEETING MEMBERS*^^^^^ 




Total 


VOTE FOR NOT MORE THAN 18 




3351-;'--'^^- r-i..; . s.h 


Blanks 


* 


146 - 


Mary Webster 


* 


142 


Kathleen Cormier 


* 


142 


Maureen Thomsen 


* 


138 


Suzanne Wright 


* 


135 


Scott Eldridge 


* 


135 V- 


Peter A. Spellios 




130 - 


Kevin Donaher 




128 


Joseph B. Simons 


* 


126 ;v 


Deborah Davis 


* 


125- ■ " . 


Maria F. Lincoln 


* 


4-^ 


Brian O'Keefe 


* 


2 


Jarrod Gibbons 




2 - ^ ■ - ■ - 


Mary McDonough 




2 ■-/ -. - 


Michael Patriarca 


* 


2 : 


Robert J Dobias 


* 


'i ^ - 


George Ryan 




1 


David Legere 






George DePaolo 






Write-ins/All Others 




4734 


Total 






PRECINCT4*!^^;s» 


TOWN MEETING MEMBERS - ' 




Total 


VOTE FOR NOT MORE THAN 19 




4646 - 


Blanks 


* 


210 


John V. Phelan, III 




190 


Patricia Shanahan 


* 


189 


Myron S. Stone 


* 


177 


Laurie O'Brien 


* 


168 


Amy Powell 


* 


165^ 


Kelly Cunningham 


* 


160*' 


Karyn Walsh 


* 


160 


Edvi^ard W. Krippendorf 


* 


160 t 


Margaret A. Somer 




160 


John Reagan 


* 


156 


Jeanne Leger 


* 


155 - - -m 


Timothy J. Dorsey 


* 


155 


Michael Faico 


* 


152 


Cynthia McNerney 


* 


150 


Richard Kraft 




145 


Andrew Brown 


* 


26 


Robert Begin 


* 


5 


Glenn Paster 




3 


Mary Susan Withrow 2-year seat 




40 


Write-ins/All Others 




7372 


Total 



OFFICIAL ELECTION RESULTS 
73 



Annual Town Election 
April 27, 2010 





mEcmcmssmmm 


TOWN MEETING MEMBERS ^ 




Total 


VOTE FOR NOT MORE THAN 18 




3666 


Blanks 


* 


162 


Richard Malagrifa 


* 


145 


Jill Sullivan 


* 


138 


Neil S. Bernstein 


* 


132 


Elizabeth (Betty Ann) Gallo 


* 


129 


Marjorie Patkin 


* 


122 


Joanne Van Der Burg 


* 


118 


Ruth K. Rooks 


* 


116 


Linso Van Der Burg 


* 


114/" 


Roger Talkov 


* 


109 


Roberta C. Rogers 


* 


107 


Barry Greenfield 


* 


106 


Joshua Forman 


* 


96 


Edward Caplan 


* 


92 


Virginia R. Zeller 


* 


89 


Bruce Whear 


* 


88 


Thomas J. O'Neill 


* 


88 


Gerald (Jerry) Sneirson 


* 


88 


Darlene Pye 












87 


David E. Zeller 




87 ' 


Stephanie Greenfield 




86 


Alexander LeBlang 




85w-: 


Michael K. Devlin 




79 r 


Jaren Landen 




75 :-?y 


John R. Karwowski 




6 


Write-ins/All Others 




6210 


Total 






PREGiNGT emmfm: 


TOWN MEETING MEMBERSm ^vfefli;-^:!^^ 




Total 


VOTE FOR NOT MORE THAN 18 




3510-' 


Blanks 


* 


187 ; ; 


Philip Rotner 




184 


Martin C. Goldman 


* 


158- V 


Lawrence S. Block 


* 


158 -r-m 


Eric Walker 




* 


154 - *ft 


Martha B. Pitman, M.D. 




140 


Susan Jacobs 


* 


136 


Anne Ward Gold 


* 


130 


Marianne McDermott 




127. 


Chris Drucas 


* 


125 


Edward Seligman 


* 


121 . 


Cynthia Merkle 


* 


118 


Judith E. Locke 


* 


117 


Mary Michael O'Hare 




100 


Sherrie L. Witt 




100 


Jack M. Beermann 




96 


Scott D. Burke 


* 


81 


Ralph (VInnie) Camerlengo 


* 


78 


Jeanne Breen 












75 


Virginia S. Burke 




73 


Amy L. O'Connor 




63 


Catherine M. Vaucher 




58 


Kyle Spear 




57 


John McEnaney 




131 


Reid J. Cassidy withdrew 






Write-ins/All Others 




6282 


Total 



OFFICIAL ELECTION RESULTS 

74 



SPECIAl TOWN MEETING 




Monday, November 16, 2009 
7:00 P.M. 
Swampscott High School 
Swampscott, Massachusetts 

TOWN CLERK'S MEETINe MINUTES 



75 



The Town of Swampscott 
Town Warrant 
November 2009 



SS. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Swampscott 
GREETINGS: 



In the name of the Commonweahh, you are hereby required to notify and warn 
the inhabitants of said Town that a special Town Meeting will be held on Monday, 
November 16, 2009, beginning at 7:00 P.M. in the auditorium of the Swampscott High 
School on Essex Street, Swampscott. 



76 



NOVEMBER 16, 2009 SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
Return of Service 

Pursuant to the within warrant to me directed, I have notified the inhabitants of the Town of 
Swampscott quahfied to vote in elections and in town affairs by posting an attested copy thereof 
at the Town Administration Building, at the Post Office, and at least two public and conspicuous 
places in each precinct in the Town, and at or in the immediate vicinity of the Swampscott 
Railroad Station. Said posting was done October 28, 2009, and not less than fourteen (14) days 
before the date appointed for said meeting. 

Attest: Paul Minsky 
Constable of Swampscott 

Mailing of Warrants 

The warrants for the Special Town Meeting were mailed to the Town Meeting Representatives on 
October 28, 2009. Copies of the warrant were available, free of charge, for any interested person 
at the Town Administration Building. 

NOTICE OF SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 2009, 7:00 P.M. 

To the Town Meeting Members: 

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Article II, Section 2, of the Bylaws of 
the Town of Swampscott that a Special Town Meeting will be held on Monday, 
November 16, 2009, beginning at 7:00 p.m. in the auditorium of the Swampscott 
High School on Essex Street. 

Moderator Martin C. Goldman, Esquire, will preside. 

Meeting Certifications: 

I hereby certify that in accordance with the adjournment of the Special Town 
Meeting of November 16, 2009 was held in the Swampscott High School 
auditorium located at 200 Essex Street and was called to order at 7:15 PM with 
the necessary quorum present (231). Monday, November 16, 2009 at 8:45 PM it 
was voted to adjourn Special Town Meeting. 

Attendance for the 2009 Special Town Meeting, by precinct, list is at the end of 
this report. 



Attest: Susan J. Duplin 
Clerk of Swampscott 



77 



ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the funds necessary, 

by borrowing or otherwise, to implement the collective bargaining agreements between 
the School Department personnel and the Town, which includes, but is not limited to, 
teachers, school administrators, custodians, cafeteria workers, clerical and non union 
employees, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the School Committee 

Comment: The purpose of this Article is to fund the collective bargaining 
agreements. 

The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 

Article 1 voted to indefinitely postpone. 
Unanimous Vote 
11/16/09 STM 



ARTICLE 2. That the sum of $6,050,000 is hereby appropriatedto pay costs of 

designing, developing and constructing a new police station on Town-owned property 
located at 531 Humphrey Street, Swampscott, and for all costs incidental and related 
thereto; and to authorize the Town Treasurer with the approval of the Board of Selectmen 
to borrow such ftinds under M.G.L. c.44, Section 7, or any other applicable statute, and to 
issue bonds and notes therefor; provided, however, that the appropriation authorized 
hereunder shall be expressly contingent upon approval by the voters of the Town to 
assess taxes in excess of the amount allowed under Proposition 2 Vi, so-called, for the 
amounts required to pay principal and interest on bonds or notes issued for the purposes 
set forth herein; and provided further that the amount of the borrowing authorized 
hereunder shall be reduced by any federal, state or other aid duly received by the Town 
for the project prior to the issuance of bonds or notes under this vote, and that the Board 
of Selectmen is authorized to take any other action necessary to carry out this vote. 

The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 

Article 2 requires 2/3 affirmative vote to adopt. 

Article 2 voted as amended 
Unanimous Vote 
11/16/09 STM 

Motion made and seconded to dissolve the Special Town Meeting at 8:45 PM. 
Majority Vote 
11/16/09 STM 



78 



Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant with your doings thereon at the time and place of 
said meeting. 

Given under our hand this 13th day of October, 2009 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 




NOVEMBER 16, 2009 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 



Pre 


Name 






Abrams, Alan 




1 


Adams, Ryan 






Baldacci, Richard R 






Bartlett-Genest Lee 


- 




Bates, Wallace T. 






Blonder, Jeffrey S 


1 

V 


1 


Briones Jorge A Jr 


V 




Buchanan, Susan 


V 


-| 


Byron-Adams Michelle 




1 iCassidy, John 


1 

V 


1 ! Chavez, Robert 




1 iCresta, Gino A Jr 


V 


1 jDandreo, Robert 




1 1 Davis Jeremy 






DiPietro, Ross 






Finlay Patricia 




1 


Green Eileen 




1 iGriffin, Alice 




1 jHartmann, Eric 




1 'iHartmann, Marianne 


V 




Hayes, Jeanne 




1 'Hubauer, Shawn 




1 ! Hyde, Sally A 






Hyde, William R Sr 


1 

V 




Johnson Maryalice 


i 

V 




Karametsopoulos Maria 


V 


1 1 Kearney Sheila 


V 


1 IKessler, Nelson 




1 LeBlanc Dean 




1 Lonnbard James 




1 Marston, Denise 


1 


1 iMcMann Gary 




1 jMentuck Douglas 


V 


1 j Miles, Chris 


V 


1 i Miles, Denise 






Montague, Neil 






Patalano, Raymond 






Patrikis, Theodore A. 






Picariello, John A 






Picariello, Lawrence 




1 ' Pierce Todd 




1 Powell Sally 


1 

V 


1 iPulos, Victoria 




1 i Rizzo, Carole 




1 ] Rooks, Norma H 




1 Ischultz, Hugh (Jim) 


V 


1 ! Scott, Digna 


V 


1 SSerino, Michael A 


V 


1 Serine, Robert 




1 [Shannon Cynthia 




1 [Shannon, Collin 




1 Speranza, Frances 




1 iWhittier, Douglas 





80 



NOVEMBER 16,2009 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 



Pre 


Name 




2 


Amore, Anthony 




2 


Barden, Eugene 




2 


Bowen, David 




2 


Cameron, Janell A 


V 


2 


Caron Mark R 




2 


Carriaan Bacik Lisa 




2 


Casella, Mark 




2 


Chaisson Ellen 




2 


Chaisson George E 




2 


Cooper, Robin 




2 


Crimmins Joseph 


V 


2 


Curry, Martha 




2 


Dohertv John J 


V 


2 


Dunn Judith F 




2 


Eichler, Tanis 




2 


Qrppnp Rphprra 




2 


Hamel Greaa "J" 


y 


2 

*- 


Hebert, Donald 




2 


Hebert Janet 




2 


Hunt Steohen 




2 


Jackson Lorene 


y 


2 


Jackson William 


^J 
y 


2 


Jones, Patrick 


V 


2 


Marcou, Martha L 




2 


McHugh, Donna 


V 


2 


Morrell, Agatha 




2 


Morris George 


y 


2 


Mulvev Edward 


y 


2 


Murphy, Brian C 




2 


Newhall, Linda A 


y 


2 


Newhall, Walter 


V 

If 


2 


Palleschi, Edward 




2 


Pinkerton, Don 




2 

*- 


Pitman, Michael 




2 


Ramstine Patricia Karama<; 

■ XWIilw&lll 1 1 t_4 LI Iwld 1 \CII CI 1 1 ICIO 




2 


Reardon Ellen M 




2 


Richmond, David E 


y 


2 


Romano, John L 




2 


Rosenberg, Gail 




2 


Ruggiero John 


y 


2 


Ryan Leah 




2 


Schultz, Jackson 




2 


Schultz, Nancy 




2 


Scibelli, Anthony A 





2 jShanahan, Joseph E Jr 

2 jSpritzWayne 

2 j Strauss, Danielle 

2 I Strauss, Joshua A 

2 'Strauss, Matthew 

2 Vogel Kristen 

2 ! Vogel, John 

2 iWhalen, Michael 
2 Whelan David Jr |V 

2 jZamansky Elizabeth Belkin 'V 

I \ L_ 



V 
V 



81 



NOVEMBER 16, 2009 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 



Pre 


Name 




3 Barden, Gary IV 


3 \ 


Bogardus, Deborah 




3 iBreen, Kevin F i 


V 


3 Breen, Leslie A I 




3 ! 


Cardenas Patricia ! 


V 


3 


Champagne-O'Keefe Donna | 




3 iColella, Angelo i 




3 IColella, Sandra 1 




3 i 


Coletti, John M 




3 


Cormier, Kathleen | 


V 


3 i 


Dandreo, Daniel J III i 




3 


Davey Maryann 


V 


3 


Davis, Deborah 


V 


3 


DePaolo Jan ! 


V 


3 i 


Domelowicz, Joseph J. Jr j 


V 


3 


Donaher Karen 




3 ' 


Donaher, Kevin ! 




3 ' 


Driscoll, Anne iV 


3 ' 


Eldridge, Barbara F j 


V 


3 


Eldridge, Scott ! 




3 


Esteverena Catherine i 


V 


3 


Fitzhenry George ! 




3 


Fox, Deborah j 




3 


Fraser, Dana | 




3 


Frenkel, Lenora 1 


V 


3 


Frenkel, Richard | 


V 


3 


Gallagher, Tara j 


V 


3 


Grimes, Daniel 1 


V 


3 


Hilario Joan 1 


V 


3 


Jones, Patricia A iV 


3 


Kelleher, Martha G iV 


3 


Legere, Carol 




3 


Lincoln Loring B Jr 




3 


Lincoln, Maria F 




3 


Luke Gerald 




3 


Lundstrom Linda 




3 


Magee, Kathleen !V 


3 


Meister Thelma Young 


V 


3 


Moltz Sandra 


V 


3 


Moss, Connie 




3 


Moss, Evan 




3 


Penyack, Jonathan 




3 


Perry, Gerard D 




3 


Pilotte Denis 


V 


3 


i Sachs-Freeman, Barbara 




3 


Small, Fred 




3 


Smith Richard 




3 


Spellios, Peter A 


V 


3 


Thomsen, Maureen 




3 


Turner, Stephen 




3 


Weaver David 


- 


3 


Webster, Mary 




3 


Welch Thomas 




3 


Wright, Suzanne 





82 



NOVEMBER 16, 2009 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 



Pre 


Name 




4 


Baker, Janet N 




4 


Balsama, Joseph J 




4 


Barden, Marc 




4 


Brown Rachel 




4 


Brown, Andrew 




4 


Callahan John 




4 


Cunningham, Kelly 


< 


4 


Dansdill, Martha 


V 


4 


Dawley Thomas 


V 


4 


DeChillo, Mary H 


V 


4 


DIMento, William R 


V 


4 


Donelan, Robert E 




4 


Donnenfeld Neil 




4 


Dreeben, Naomi 




4 


Drummond, Brian 


V 


4 


Drummond, Ellen M 


i 


4 


Faico, Michael 


V 


4 


Fridman, Nanette R 




4 


Goldman, Iris 


V 


4 


Goudreau, Connie 


V 


4 


Greehan, Kathleen M 


V 


4 


Howe, Christopher 




4 


Hughes, Nancy 


V 


4 


Jurma, Jer 


V 


4 


Kane Richard M Jr 




4 


keeter Terri 




4 


Kinney Jacqueline (Jackie) 


V 


4 


Kraft, Richard 


V 


4 


Krippendorf, Edward W. Sr 


V 


4 


Leger, Jeanne 


< 


4 


Lord, Gary 


V 


4 


Lord, Nancy 




4 


McClung Michael 




4 


McEnaney, John T 




4 


McNerney, Cynthia 




4 


Meninno, Christine 


V 


4 


Moynihan, John 


V 


4 


O'Brien, Laurie 




4 


Paster, Linda L 


V 


4 


Phelan John V IV 




4 


Phelan, John V III 




4 


Powell, Amy 




4 


Reagan, John 


V 


4 


Resler, Henry 




4 


Sarafini-Foley Phyllis 


■ ■ 


4 


Shanahan, Patricia D 


V 


4 


Sheehan Neil G 


V 


4 


Somer, Margaret 


V 


4 


stone, Myron S 


V 


4 


Vaucher, Catherine M 




4 


Walsh, Karyn LK 


V 


4 


Watson Brian T 




4 


jWithrow, Marysusan Buckley 


u 


4 


Wynne, Katie 

i 





83 



NOVEMBER 16, 2009 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 



Pre 


Name 




5 


■Akim, Marta 




5 


jBelhumeur, Cynthia Hatch 




5 


Belhumeur, R. Thomas 


iv 


5 


1 Bernstein, Neil 


!V 


5 


Callahan, Michael 


iv 


5 


Caplan, Edward 


IV 


5 


Carangelo, Lisa 


V 


5 


Carden, John 


V 


5 


Carr, Heather 




5 


Cerra Anthony J 




5 


Chapman, Randy 


V 


5 


Devlin, Michael K 


V 


5 


Epstein, Jay 


V 


5 


Fletcher, Mary Ellen 


V 


5 


Forman Amy 




5 


Forman, Adam 


V 


5 


Graham, David 


V 


5 


Grant, Kenneth 




5 


Hartmann, Jill 




5 


Hennessey, William F 


V 


5 


Hodgkin, Doreen L 




5 


Hyman, Merle 




5 


Ippolito, Angela 


V 


5 


Jaffe, Sharon Tripolsky 




5 


Karwowski, John R 




5 


Keller, Ellen Long 




5 


Lawler, Jack 


V 


5 iLawler, Sami 


V 


5 


Lipson Philip 


V 


5 


Mazow Robert E 


V 


5 


Nellis, Veeder C 


V 


5 


O'Neill, Thomas 


V 


5 


Patkin, Marjorie 




5 1 


Patkin, Randall 


V 


5 i 


Pye, Darlene 




5 1 Rogers, Roberta C 


V 


5 1 


Rooks George 


V 


5 1 


Rooks, Ruth 




5 jRossmanNeil 




5 j 


Rubin, Gayle 


V 


5 'Shore Geraldine 




5 1 


Snelrson, Gerald 


V 


5 


Steinman, Roy H 




5 


Sullivan, Jill 


V 


5 


Talkov, Roger 


V 


5 


Van Dam David S 




5 


Vanderburg, Joanne 


V 


5 1 


Vanderburg, Linso 


V 


5 i 


Vatcher, Howard 


V 


5 IWeiner, Lawrence J 




5 ! 


Wollerscheid, William L 


V 


5 IZarlnsky, Irma W Dr 


V 


5 1 


Zeller, David E 


V 


5 1 

i 


Zeller, Virginia 


V 



84 



NOVEMBER 16, 2009 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 



Pre 


Name i 




6 ' 


Baker, Robert A 




6 


BeauDre Laurier ! 


V 


6 


Rpprmann Jark M i 




Rplkin Svlvia B i 




6 


Block Lawrence S ! 


V 


6 


Block, Ina-Lee i 


V 


6 


Burgess, Sue iV 


6 ; 


Burke, Scott V 


6 


Cronin, Michael ! 




6 1 


Dembowski, Claire C 'V 


6 DeVellis, Daniel D | 


V 


6 


Driscoll, Thomas H Jr. Esq ' 


V 


' 1 


Drucas, Chris W 


6 i 


Eriich Norman 


J 

Y 


6 


Folta, Rand \ 


J 


6 : 


Frisch, Peter 




6 


Gold, Anne W 




6 


Goldman, Jeff 




6 1 Goldman, Martin C 


J 

V 


6 Gupta, Mary Kelly 




6 






6 


Hirkpv 1 A 




R 
U 


Hnr\A/it7 l^rav/tin Pafrir^ia 


J 


ft 
D 


JclOUUo, oUodli 




JalslUUo, r\IUIIa(U 




o 


Kana Inhn P Ir 


v 


D 


ixallc, oUbdll 


y 


D 


LcdIIIUII, JUlldllldll 


^| 

y 


ft 


LCVclloUII, 1 dUI C CZbLj 




6 




y 


6 


Locke Judith E 


y 


6 


Markarian, Joe 


y 


6 


Merkle, Cynthia 


y 


6 


O'Hare, Mary Michael 




6 


Paster Ruth 




6 


Paster, Marc 




6 


Pelletier, Maria 




6 


Pitman, Martha 




6 


Poster, Eugene L 


V 


6 


Rotner, Kim 




6 


Rotner, Philip 


■ 


6 


Ryan, Daniel 




6 


Ryan, Mary Ann 


V 


6 


Ryan, William 


V 


6 


Sackett, Shelley A 




6 


Seligman, Edward 




6 


Shutzer, Carole B 


IV 


6 


Shutzer, Kenneth B 


iv 


6 


iTennant, Cynthia P 




6 


Walker, Eric 




6 


Whitman, Andrew S 


1' 


6 


jWitt, Sherri L. 




6 


jYaeger, Dan 




6 


iYaeger, Lisa L 





85 




The Town of Swampscott 
Town Election Warrant 
April 27, 2010 



siAMPSe8JT.BA 



2010 APR 15 P 2-21 



To either of the constables of the Town of Swampscott 
GREETINGS: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify and warn the inhabitants of 
said town who are qualified to vote in elections and town affairs to vote at: 



Precinct 1 
Precinct 2 
Precinct 3 
Precinct 4 
Precinct 5 
Precinct 6 



Swampscott Senior Center 
Swampscott Senior Center 
First Church Congregational 
First Church Congregational 
Swampscott Middle School 
Swampscott Middle School 



200 Rear Essex Street 
200 Rear Essex Street 
Monument Avenue 
Monument Avenue 
Forest Avenue 
Forest Avenue 



on 



Tuesday, the twenty-seventh day of April 2010, 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. for the following purpose: 



To choose a Moderator for one (1) year 

To choose two (2) members for the Board of Selectmen for three (3) years 

To choose a member for the Board of Assessors for three (3) years 

To choose two (2) members for the School Committee for three (3) years 

To choose a member for the Trustees of the Public Library for three (3) years 

To choose a member for the Board of Health for three (3) years 

To choose a member for the Planning Board for five (5) years 

To choose a member for the Planning Board for three (3) years 

To choose a member for the Housing Authority for five (5) years 

To choose three (3) members for Constable for three (3) years 

To choose Town Meeting Members in each of the six (6) precincts filling any three (3) year vacant seats 
with the highest vote getters, filling any two (2) year vacant seats with the next highest vote getters, and 
filling any one (1) year vacant seats with the next highest vote getters. 

At the close of the election the meeting will adjourn to Monday, May 3, 2010 at 7:15 p.m. at 
Swampscott High School, 200 Essex Street, Swampscott, MA. 

Given under our hands this 




NOTICE OF PRECINCT CAUCUS MEETINGS 



Caucus meetings for all Swampscott precincts have been scheduled for Monday, May 3, 2010, 
beginning at 6:45 p.m. in the Swampscott High School located at 200 Essex Street, Swampscott. Room 
assignments are as follows: 

Precinct 1 - Room TBA Precinct 4 - Room TBA 

Precinct 2 - Room TBA Precinct 5 - Room TBA 

Precinct 3 - Room TBA Precinct 6 - Room TBA 

NOTES: 

Please remember that it is YOUR responsibility to be recorded as being present with the door 
checl<ers prior to entering the auditorium for EACH session. Excessive absences are cause for removal 
from Town Meeting membership. Also, please remember the following: 

1 . You must wear (display) your Town Meeting identification badge at ail times; 

2. Remember to use the microphones when speaking on any issue so that your comments 
may be recorded on the official transcript of the meeting and be heard by your fellow 
members in the hall and residents viewing the live cable telecast. 

Susan Duplin 
Clerk of Swampscott 



2010 ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

RETURN OF SERVICE: 

Pursuant to the within warrant to me directed, I have notified the inhabitants of The Town of Swampscott qualified 
to vote in elections and in town affairs by posting an attested copy thereof at the Town Administration Building, at 
the Post Office, and at least two public and conspicuous places in each precinct in the Town, and at or in the 
immediately vicinity of the Swampscott Railroad Station. Said posting was done on April 15, 2010, and not less 
than seven (7) days before the date appointed for said Election. 



Attest: 

Paul Minsky 
Constable of Swampscott 



MAILING OF WARRANTS: 

The Warrants for the Annual Town Meeting were mailed to the Town Meeting Representatives on April 15, 2010. 
Copies of the warrant were available, fi-ee of charge, for any interested person at the Town Administration Building 

ATRUECOW MAY 3. 2010 

TcwmClMfciSvvam^cott MINUTES 

87 



NOTICE OF ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 



The Annual Town Meeting of 2010 will convene on Tuesday, April 27, 2010, with Article 1 (the 
Town Election) at 7:00 a.m. in the Town's regular polling places. At 8:00 p.m., the Town Meeting will be 
adjourned until Monday, May 3, 2010, 7:15 p.m., when it will be reconvened in the Swampscott High 
School Auditorium located at 200 Essex Street, Swampscott. 



NOTICE OF ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
MONDAY. MAY 3. 2010. 7:15 P.M. 



To the Town Meeting members: 

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Article I, Section 2, of the Bylaws of the Town of Swampscott 
that the Adjourned Annual Town Meeting will be held on Monday, May 3, 2010, beginning at 7:15 p.m. in 
the Swampscott High School Auditorium located at 200 Essex Street, Swampscott. Moderator Joe 
Markarian will preside. 

Susan J. Duplin 
Clerk of Swampscott 



Meeting Certifications: 

I hereby certify that in accordance with the adjournment of the Annual Town Meeting of April 27, 2010 
(the election) the Adjourned Annual Town Meeting (business portion) of May 3, 2010 was held in the 
Swampscott High School Auditorium located at 200 Essex Street and was called to order at 7:25 PM with 
the necessary quorum present (163). 

Attendance: 

For the 2010 Annual Town Meeting attendance, by precinct, see the list at the end of this report. 



88 



TOWN MEETING ACTION 



The Return of Service was read by Town Clerk Susan J. Duplin who administered the Oath of Office to 
the newly elected Town Meeting Members. 

Moderator Markarian acknowledged State Senator Thomas McGee and State Representative Lori 
Ehrlich. 

Moderator Markarian introduced all the newly elected officials; David S. Van Dam & Richard Malagrifa for 
Board of Selectmen, Neil G. Sheehan for Board of Assessors, Jaren Landen & Laurier Beaupre for 
School Committee, Marianne McDermott for Trustee of the Public Library, Lawrence S. Block for Board of 
Health, Jeffrey S. Blonder & Patrick Jones for Planning Board and Barbara Eldridge for Housing 
Authority. 

Moderator Markarian acknowledged 3 representatives from the Swampscott High School Cheerieading 
team who won the Northeastern District, the State Division 3 Championship and the recent National 
finalists. 

Moderator Markarian recognized Tom Reid who is the Swampscott High School Video & Technology 
Director along with Alice Goldsmith, a member of the Drug and Alcohol Task Force. 

Moderator Markarian presented the Distinguished Citizen Award to Martin Goldman. 



89 



The Town of Swampscott 
Town Warrant 
April 2010 



SS. 



To either of the Constables of the Town of Swampscott 



GREETINGS: 



In the name of the Commonwealth, you are hereby required to notify and warn the inhabitants of 
said town who are qualified to vote in elections and Town affairs to vote at: 



Precinct One 
Precinct Two 
Precinct Three 
Precinct Four 
Precinct Five 
Precinct Six 



Swampscott Senior Center 
Swampscott Senior Center 
First Church Congregational 
First Church Congregational 
Swampscott Middle School 
Swampscott Middle School 



200 Rear Essex Street 
200 Rear Essex Street 
Monument Avenue 
Monument Avenue 
Forest Avenue 
Forest Avenue 



on Tuesday, the twenty-seventh day of April, 2010, from 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. for the following 
purpose: 



To choose a Moderator for one (1 ) year 

To choose two (2) members for the Board of Selectmen for three (3) years 

To choose one (1 ) member for the Board of Assessors for three (3) years 

To choose two (2) members for the School Committee for three (3) years 

To choose one (1 ) member for the Trustees of the Public Library for three (3) years 

To choose one (1 ) member for the Board of Health for three (3) years 

To choose one (1 ) member for the Planning Board for five (5) years 

To choose one (1 ) member for the Planning Board for three (3) years 

To choose one (1 ) member for the Housing Authority for five (5) years 

To choose three (3) members for Constable for three (3) years 



To choose Town Meeting Members in each of the six (6) precincts filling any three (3) year vacant seats 
with the highest vote getters, filling any two (2) year vacant seats with the next highest vote getters, and 
filling any one (1 ) year vacant seats with the next highest vote getters. 



At the close of the election, the meeting will adjourn to Monday, May 3, 2010, at 7:15 p.m. in the 
Swampscott High School Auditorium located at 200 Essex Street, Swampscott. 



90 



ARTICLE 2. To hear and act on the reports of Town Officials, Boards and Committees. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Comment: This routine Article appears every year to allow Town groups to make reports. 



A report from Linso Van Der Burg of the Phillips Park Committee. 

A report from Jacqueline Kinney of the Swampscott School Committee. 



91 



ARTICLE 3. Moved that the Town transfer the care, custody, management and control of the land 

and buildings known as Phillips Park and located at 601 Humphrey Street, Swampscott, identified on the Town's 
Assessor's maps as: Map 24, Lot E40 from the Board of Selectmen for the purpose for which such land is 
currently held to the Board of Selectmen for purposes of recreation and telecommunications, and further to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to lease to a provider(s) of telecommunication services for the installation and 
maintenance of telecommunications antennae, facilities and related equipment, upon such terms and 
conditions, and for such consideration, as the Board of Selectmen shall determine to be appropriate, such 
lease(s) to be for a term of up to twenty (20) years, and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to grant such non- 
exclusive easements to utility companies as the Board of Selectmen deems appropriate under such lease(s) to 
provide utility service to such facilities and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to execute a lease{s) and any 
other documents to effectuate the foregoing; and further to authorize the Board of Selectmen to seek legislative 
authorization for the aforesaid transfer under Article 97 of the Articles of Amendment to the Massachusetts 
Constitution, if necessary; or take any other action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Town Administrator 

Comment: This would allow the town to select a cell phone provider who would erect light poles at 
Blocksidge Field that would also contain cell antennae. 



Article 3 

Unanimous Vote/PASSED 
5/3/10 ATIVI 



92 




93 



ARTICLE 4. Moved that the Town transfer the care, custody, management and control of a 

parcel of land located at Tedesco Road in Marblehead, containing approximately 1,140 square feet, 
identified on the Town of Marblehead Assessor's Map 15, Lot 5, from the Board of Selectmen for the 
purpose for which such land is currently held to the Board of Selectmen for the purpose of conveyance 
and to authorize the Chief Procurement Officer to sell the parcel of land per the provisions of 
Massachusetts General Law Chapter 30B, as applicable; or take any other action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Town Administrator 

Comment: The purpose of this Article is to allow the Town Administrator and the Selectmen 
to dispose of an un-developable parcel of approximately 1,140 square feet located at Tedesco 
Road in Marblehead. This request is being made on behalf of the residents of 9 Florence Road, 
Marblehead. A map of the parcel can be found in Appendix G. 



Article 4 

Unanimous Vote/PASSED 
5/3/10 ATM 



94 



ARTICLE 5. Moved that the Town transfer the care, custody, management and control of the land 

and building formerly known as Swampscott Middle School and located at 71 Greenwood Avenue, Swampscott, 
identified on the Town's Assessor's maps as: Map 19, Lot 87, from the Board of Selectmen for the purposes for 
which such land is currently held to the Board of Selectmen for the purposes of sale and for demolition of the 
building and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to sell the parcel of land per the provisions of Massachusetts 
General Law Chapter SOB, 

and further that such sale not occur unless the following conditions have been satisfied: 

(a) the Board of Selectmen issue a "request for proposals" ("RFP"), which shall include 
design guidelines that are substantially in compliance with the Swampscott Planned Development District 
Design Guidelines, November 10, 2008 (the "Design Guidelines"), except that all references to 
preservation of the 1895 building or portion of the building may be deleted such that the 1895 building 
may be demolished and the property may be developed otherwise consistently with the Design 
Guidelines and provide that responses meeting the Design Guidelines shall be more favorably viewed; 

(b) the Board of Selectmen execute a "Land Development Agreement" with the successful 
responder to the RFP that maximizes the benefits to the Town, including restrictions requiring 
compliance with final design guidelines that are substantially in compliance with the Design Guidelines as 
modified above in (a) ; 

(c) the Board of Selectmen approve a restriction that would preserve the existing trees and 
other natural features of the portion of the property along the boundary of Fuller Avenue; and 

(d) the Board of Selectmen approve any other restrictions, including restrictions on use, that 
are in the best interests of the Town and that would effectuate the purposes of providing the maximum 
benefit to the Town from the proposed sale of the property, upon such terms and conditions as the Board 
of Selectmen may deem appropriate and necessary. 

Or, take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Comment: This Article would remove the requirement currently in place that any developer 
purchasing the former Greenwood Avenue Middle School must retain that portion of the building 
erected in 1895. 



Article 5 

Majority Vote/FAILED 
5/3/10 ATM 



95 



ARTICLE 6. Moved that the Town adopt the "Stretch Energy Code" set forth in the State 

Building Code at 780 CMR 120.AA (i.e., Appendix 120.AA), as may be amended from time to 
time, and to amend the Town of Swampscott's General By-laws by inserting a new Chapter XVI 
entitled "Stretch Energy Code" as set forth below: 

. Stretch Energy Code 

-1. Adoption. The Town of Swampscott has adopted the provisions of 780 CMR 

120.AA (i.e.. Appendix 120.AA of the State Building Code or the "Stretch Energy Code"), 
as may be amended from time to time, in place of the provisions set forth under 780 CMR 
13.00, 34.00, 61.00 and 93.00. 

-2. Purpose. The purpose of the Stretch Energy Code shall be to provide the Town 

with a more energy efficient alternative to the base energy code otherwise set forth under 
the State Building Code. 

Or take any action relative thereto 

Sponsored by the Renewable Energy Committee 



Motion made and seconded to postpone & defer Article 6 to a position after Article 11/Unanimous 
vote-5/3/10 

Article 6 

Majority Vote/PASSED 
5/3/10 ATM 



96 



ARTICLE 7. Moved that the Town become a member of the Essex North Shore Agricultural 

and Technical School District ("the "District") in accordance with Chapter 463 of the Acts of 2004 (as 
amended); and that the proportioned share of $133,000,000 of the estimated construction costs of the 
Essex North Shore Agricultural and Technical High School, based on the Town's projected percentage of 
enrollment for the proposed Essex North Shore Agricultural and Technical High School, which school 
facility shall have an anticipated useful life as an educational facility for the instruction of school children 
for at least 50 years, said construction funds to be expended under the direction of the Essex North Shore 
Agricultural and Technical School District in accordance with Chapter 463 of the Acts of 2004 (as 
amended) and M.G.L. Chapter 44, M.G.L. Chapter 71, and that Town acknowledges that the 
Massachusetts School Building Authority's ("MSBA") grant program is a non-entitlement, discretionary 
program based on need, as determined by the MSBA, and any project costs the District incurs in excess 
of any grant approved by and received from the MSBA shall be the sole responsibility of the District; 
provided further that any grant that the District may receive from the MSBA for the Project shall be based 
on a total project budget of $125,000,000 and shall not exceed the lesser of (1) sixty-two percent 
(62.00%) of eligible, approved project costs, as determined by the MSBA, or (2) the total maximum grant 
amount as determined by the MSBA; and that the amount of borrowing authorized for the District shall be 
reduced by any grant amount set forth in the Project Funding Agreement that may be executed between 
the District and the MSBA; and further provided that the MSBA's grant is conditioned upon the election by 
cities and towns representing at least 75 percent of the October 1, 2004 foundation enrollment of the 
North Shore Vocational Regional School District to become a member municipality of the District 
Sponsored by the Town Administrator 

Comment: The purpose of this article is to authorize Swampscott to participate in the 
merged Essex North Shore Agricultural and Technical School District, including authorizing the 
funding of its pro-rata share of the cost of construction for a new school. 



Article 7 

Voted as Amended 
Unanimous Vote/PASSED 
5/3/10 ATM 



97 



ARTICLE 8. Moved that the Town appropriate $233,000 to repair, construct or reconstruct 

streets, together with all necessary work incidental thereto, including engineering, in conjunction with the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, under General Laws, Chapter 90 or otherwise; and to transfer for this 
purpose any unexpended balance of appropriations voted for this purpose at prior Town Meetings, or take 
any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Director of Public Works 

Comment: The purpose of this article is to appropriate monies approved by the Legislature 
for highway and traffic safety projects as approved by the Massachusetts Highway Department. 
The monies may be spent for more than one year. 



Article 8 

Unanimous Vote/PASSED 
5/3/10 ATM 



98 



ARTICLE 9. Moved that the Town appropriate $1,838,436 for the projects identified in Article 

9 of the Annual Town Meeting Warrant of 2010 in the arnounts listed under the column heading 
"Recommended" in said Article 9, and to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer with the approval of the 
Board of Selectmen is authorized to borrow $1,838,436 under Chapter 44 of the General Laws or any 
other enabling authority. 



No. 



Purpose 



Requested 



Recommended 



School Department 
11-01 Paving (Middle School/Hadley) 
11-02 Asbestos Abatement (Hadley/Mlddle School) 
11-03 Window panels (Hadley/Stanley) 
11-04 Classroom doors (Clarke/Stanley) 
11-05 Technology(Elementary computers/M.S. 
smartboards) 

Department of Public Works 
11-06 Road Replacement 
11-07 Paving Chapter 90 

11-08 Playground and Open Space Improvements 
11-09 Public Buildings Maintenance 
11-10 MWRA Water Main Project 

Police Department 
11-11 Cruisers 

11-12 Repair Building Exterior 
11-13 Interior Rehab 



180,000 
145,170 
50,000 
60.000 
75,000 



150,000 
233,000 
50,000 
150,000 
560,266 



58,000 
41,000 
70,000 



180,000 
151,170 
50.000 
60,000 
75,000 



150,000 
233,000 
50,000 
150,000 
560.266 



54.000 
40,000 
60,000 



Fire Department 
11-14 Fire Alarm Replacement (Wired) 



25,000 



25.000 



Total 1.847.436 1.838.436 

Each numbered item will be considered a separate appropriation. The budgeted amount may be spent 
only for the stated purpose. 

Sponsored by the Capital Improvement Committee 

Comment: The above projects were recommended for funding in FY201 1 by the Capital 
Improvement Committee (CIC). Refer to Appendix A for the complete CIC report. 



Article 9 

Unanimous Vote/PASSED 
5/3/10 ATM 



99 



ARTICLE 1 0. Moved that the Town appropriate the necessary funds, by borrowing or 

otherwise, for the following projects, or take any action relative thereto. 



No. Purpose Requested Recommended 

Department of Public Works 

11-15 Replacement of Street Signs 25,000 

11-16 Utility Truck Replacement (2) 150,000 

Police Department 

11-17 Construct New Holding Cells 860,000 

11-18 Lead Abatement 27,000 

Fire Department 

11-19 Construct New Holding Ceils 37,000 

11-20 Floor Tile Replacement 37,000 

Technology 

11-21 Upgrade Town Wide 50,000 

Total 1,186,000 

Each numbered item will be considered a separate appropriation. The budgeted amount may be spent 
only for the stated purpose. 

Sponsored by the Capital Improvement Committee 

Comment: The above projects were not recommended for funding in FY2010 by the Capital 
Improvement Committee. 



Article 10 

Voted that action on this article be indefinitely postponed 
Majority Vote/PASSED 
5/3/10 ATM 



100 



ARTICLE 11. Moved that the Town appropriate $ 940,616 by bonding or otherwise to make 

improvements to school and town building as identified in the Energy Audit prepared by Johnson Controls 
and detailed in the Appendix of the printed Warrant on page 43, and to meet this appropriation, the 
Treasurer with the approval of the Board of Selectmen is authorized to borrow $940,616 or take any 
action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Renewable Energy Committee 

Comment: The Town along with the Renewable Energy Committee contracted with Johnson 
Controls to perform an energy audit of all active town and school buildings, except the police 
station. Based on the results of that audit, recommendations were made for improvements to 
those buildings which will reduce energy consumption by a sufficient amount to cover the debt 
service cost of the improvements. 



Article 11 

Unanimous Vote/PASSED 
5/3/10 ATM 



101 



Article 11 
Unanimous Vote 
5/3/10 Am 





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<31 




CM 


CO 


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CO 
CM 


to 

CM 


to 

CM 


CM 


00 
CM 




















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to 


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tn 

CM 


to 


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CM 









102 



DEBT SERVICE COSTS V. SAVINGS ESCO IMPROVEMENTS 

Fifteen Year Principal $ 255,618 



$ 255,618 

3.25% 



r ayiiiciik ^uiicuuic 




Prinrtn;il 

rill I^IUQ 1 






Total 




tJO VII 


ivd waviiics 




7ni 1 


< 


17 041 




8,308 


-? 


25,349 


49,981 


24,632.22 








17 ndi 




7 7'i4 


< 




■ii 75n 








< 


1 7 riAi 


< 


7 7nn 




74 741 










< 


17 riAi 


< 


D,DHD 


< 






51 777 tlK 








1 7 nAi 


e 








';7 'iKA 


54 77n Q7 




2016 


$ 


17,041 


s 


5,538 


$ 


22,580 


59,362 


36,782.16 




2017 




17,041 


$ 


4,985 


s 


22,026 


61,439 


39,413.66 






< 

y 


17,041 


< 


4 431 


< 


21 472 


63 590 


42 117.88 




2019 


$ 


17,041 


$ 


3,877 


$ 


20,918 


65,815 


44,897.36 




2020 


$ 


17,041 


$ 


3,323 


$ 


20,364 


68,119 


47,754.74 




2021 


$ 


17,041 


$ 


2,769 


$ 


19,810 


70,503 


50,692.74 




2022 


$ 


17,041 


s 


2,215 


s 


19,257 


72,971 


53,714.19 




2023 


$ 


17,041 


$ 


1,662 


s 


18,703 


75,525 


56,822.01 




2024 


$ 


17,041 


$ 


1,108 


$ 


18,149 


78,168 


60,019.21 




2025 


$ 


17,041 


$ 


554 


$ 


17,595 


80,904 


63,308.93 






$ 


255,618 


$ 


66,461 


$ 


322,079 


964,417 




8,980 


Ten Year Principal 


$ 


255,618 


















< 


255,618 
























3.25% 
















PrinrinAl 
rill ii>i|joi 




11 ILCI 


Total 




VII 1^3 






2011 


< 


25 562 


< 


8,308 




33,869 


49,981 


16 111 6? 




2012 


< 


25,562 


< 


7,477 




33 039 


51,730 


18 591.71 




2013 


< 


25,562 


< 


6,646 


< 


32,208 


53,541 


21 333 03 




2014 


V 


25,562 


$ 


5,815 


< 


31,377 


55,415 


24,037.72 




2015 


$ 


25,562 


$ 


4,985 


$ 


30,546 


57,354 


26,808.00 




2016 


$ 


25,562 


$ 


4,154 


$ 


29,716 


59,362 


29,646.16 




2017 


s 


25,562 


$ 


3,323 


$ 


28,885 


61,439 


32,554.58 




2018 


$ 


25,562 


$ 


2,492 


$ 


28,054 


63,590 


35,535.71 




2019 


$ 


25,562 


$ 


1,662 


$ 


27,223 


65,815 


38,592.12 




2020 


$ 


25,562 


s 


831 


$ 


26,393 


68,119 


41,726.41 




2021 






s 




$ 










2022 






$ 




$ 










2023 






$ 




$ 










2024 






$ 




S 










2025 






$ 




s 












$ 


255,618 


$ 


45,692 


$ 


301,310 


586,347 




8.980 



103 



5 t: 



I 



~ ' o 



5 .2 



Q 

S E 



o 
o 

Q. > 



104 



DEBT SERVICE COSTS V. SAVINGS ESCO IMPROVEMENTS 

Fifteen Year Principal $ 940,616 



$ 940,616 

3.25% 



Payment Schedule 




Principal 




Interest 


Total 


Savings 


Net Savings 


Rebates 


2011 


5 


o "7no 

bl,/\Jo 




30,570 




y^jZ/O 


96,866 


3,588.25 


72,959 


2012 


5 


d2,/0o 


5 


28,532 


? 


yi,z40 


100,256 


9,016.56 




2013 


S 


62,708 


5 


26,494 




89,202 


103,765 


14,563.53 




2014 


s 


62,708 


$ 


24,456 




8/, 164 


107,397 


20,233.32 




2015 


s 


62,708 


$ 


22,418 


$ 


85,126 


111,156 


26,030.21 




2016 


$ 


62,708 


S 


20,380 


$ 


83,088 


115,046 


31,958.68 




2017 


$ 


62,708 


$ 


18,342 


< 
> 




119,073 


38,023.30 




ZUlo 




OZ, /Uo 






$ 


79,012 


123,241 


44,228.85 




2019 


$ 


62,708 


$ 


14,266 


< 


75 974 


127,554 


50,580.28 






It 

? 


fi7 7nR 


■? 




$ 


74,936 




D /,UOZ.D/ 




2021 


$ 


62,708 


$ 


10,190 


< 


72,898 


136,639 


63,741.32 




2022 




62,708 


< 


8,152 




70,860 


141,421 


70 561 69 




2023 


< 


62,708 


< 


6,114 


$ 


68,822 


146,371 


77,549.44 




2024 


s 


62,708 


< 


4,076 


$ 


66,784 


151 494 


84,710.43 




2025 


$ 


62,708 


$ 


2,038 


$ 


64,746 


156,796 


92,050.73 






$ 


940,616 


$ 


244,560 


$ 


1,185,176 


1,869,095 


. 683;91!^ 


72,969 


Ten Year Princinal 




940 616 


















> 






• 
































Payment Schedule 




• 

Principal 




Interest 


Total 


Savings 


Net Savings 


Rebates 






y4,UoZ 




30,570 


$ 


124,632 


96,866 


(27,765.62) 


72,969 










T7 CI 3 

2/,bl3 


$ 


121,575 


100,256 


(21,318.31) 










> 


z4,4ob 


$ 


118,518 


■ino ICC 

103, /ob 


(14,752.34) 






< 




> 




$ 


115,461 


lU/,33/ 


(0,063.03) 






< 








$ 


112,404 


1111 


.Oj) 




2016 




94,062 




15,285 


s 


109,347 








2017 


$ 


94,062 


$ 


12,228 


$ 


106,290 


119,073 


12,783.44 




2018 


$ 


94,062 


$ 


9,171 


$ 


103,233 


123,241 


20,008.00 




2019 


$ 


94,062 


$ 


6,114 


s 


100,176 


127,554 


27,378.42 




2020 


$ 


94,062 


$ 


3,057 


$ 


97,119 


132,018 


34,899.81 




2021 






$ 




$ 










2022 






$ 




$ 










2023 






$ 




$ 










2024 






s 




$ 










2025 






$ 




$ 












$ 


940,616 


$ 


168,135 


$ 


1,108,751 


1,136,373 




72,969 



105 



















w 

m 




a 




s 






u 






o 

u 


c 


a. 


o 


s 






c 


V. 






Itlli 


1 




o 





^ ^ — a oi 



3 



a 
_ u. 
SJ> 



o a c 

SI =1 o 



~ 3 
2i < 



I 



0> : 



O 



E 



a. a. o 
E 

B 

>« >. X 



106 



DEBT SERVICE COSTS V. SAVINGS ESCO IMPROVEMENTS 

Fifteen Year Principal $ 2,406,557 



$ 2,406,557 

3.25% 



Pavment Schedule 




Principal 




Interest 


Total 


Savings 


Net Savings 


Rebates 


2011 


< 


160,437 


< 


78,213 


$ 


238,650 


226,726 


(11,924.24) 


146,869 


2012 


< 


160,437 


< 


72,999 


$ 


233,436 


234,661 


1,225.38 




2013 


< 


160,437 


< 


67,785 


$ 


228,222 


242,875 


14,652.74 




2014 


< 


160,437 


< 


62,570 


$ 


223,008 


251,375 


28,367.55 






< 


160,437 


■? 


57 356 


$ 


217,793 


260 173 


42 379 89 




2016 


< 


160 437 


< 


52 142 


$ 


212,579 


269 279 


56 700 16 




2017 


$ 


160,437 


$ 


46,928 


$ 


207,365 


278,704 


71,339.15 




2018 


$ 


160,437 


$ 


41,714 


$ 


202,151 


288,459 


86,308.00 




2019 


$ 


160,437 


$ 


36,499 


$ 


196,937 


298,555 


101,618.26 




2020 


$ 


160,437 


s 


31,285 


$ 


191,722 


309,004 


117,281.89 




2021 


$ 


160,437 


$ 


26,071 


$ 


186,508 


319,819 


133,311.25 




2022 


$ 


160,437 


$ 


20,857 


$ 


181,294 


331,013 


149,719.13 




2023 


$ 


160,437 


$ 


15,643 


$ 


176,080 


342,599 


166,518.80 




2024 


$ 


160,437 


$ 


10,428 


$ 


170,866 


354,590 


183,723.95 




2025 


$ 


160,437 


$ 


5,214 


$ 


165,651 


367,000 


201,348.79 






$ 


2,406,557 


$ 


625,705 


s 


3,032,262 


4,374,833 




146,869 



Ten Year Principal $ 2,406,557 



$ 2,406,557 

3.25% 

Payment Schedule Principal Interest 



2011 


$ 


240,656 


$ 


78,213 


2012 


$ 


240,656 


$ 


70,392 


2013 


$ 


240,656 


$ 


62,570 


2014 


S 


240,656 


$ 


54,749 


2015 


$ 


240,656 


$ 


46,928 


2016 


$ 


240,656 


$ 


39,107 


2017 


$ 


240,656 


$ 


31,285 


2018 


$ 


240,656 


$ 


23,464 


2019 


$ 


240,656 


$ 


15,643 


2020 


$ 


240,656 


$ 


7,821 


2021 






$ 




2022 






$ 




2023 






$ 




2024 






$ 




2025 






$ 





$ 2,406,557 $ 430,172 



Total Savings Net Savings Rebates 



$ 


318,869 


226,726 


(92,142.80) 


$ 


311,047 


234,661 


(76,386.08) 


$ 


303,226 


242,875 


(60,351.62) 


$ 


295,405 


251,375 


(44,029.70) 


$ 


287,584 


260,173 


(27,410.26) 


$ 


279,762 


269,279 


(10,482.89) 


$ 


271,941 


278,704 


6,763.20 


$ 


264,120 


288,459 


24,339.16 


$ 


256,298 


298,555 


42,256.53 


$ 


248,477 


309,004 


60,527.26 



$ - - 

$ - - 

$ - - - 

$ : : 

$ 2,836,729 2,659,812 T^MS^^I^ 146,869 



107 



ARTICLE 12. Moved that the Town amend the Position Classification and Salary 

Classification Plans of the Personnel Board By-Laws, exclusive of reclassification, as it applies to those 
positions not covered by collective bargaining agreements, and appropriate the necessary funds, by 
borrowing or othenwise, as recommended by the Personnel Board, or take any action relative thereto. The 
proposed modified classification plans can be found in Appendix E. 
Sponsored by the Personnel Board 

Comment: This article allows the Town to adopt changes to the Job Classification and 
Salary Classification Plans of the Personnel By-Laws. There is a 0% cost of living increase 
proposed in Fiscal 201 1 for employees subject to the Personnel By-Law. 

The Finance Committee will report on this Article at Town Meeting. 



Article 12 

Majority Vote/PASSED 
5/3/10 ATM 



108 



ARTICLE 13. Moved that the Town amend the Personnel Board By-Laws so as to reclassify 

certain existing positions, as recomnnended by the Personnel Board, or take any action relative thereto. 
The proposed modified classification schedule can be found in Appendix E. 
Sponsored by the Personnel Board 

Comment: This article allows the Town to reclassify positions covered by the Personnel By- 
Laws. 



Article 13 

Voted that action on this article be indefinitely postponed 
Majority Vote/PASSED 
5/3/10 ATM 



109 



ARTICLE 14. Moved that the Town appropriate the funds necessary, by borrowing or 

otherwise, to fund and implement the collective bargaining agreements between the Board of Selectmen 
and the various unions under the Board of Selectmen for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2010, or take 
any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Comment: The purpose of this Article is to fund the collective bargaining agreements. 



Article 14 

Voted that action on this article be indefinitely postponed 
Majority Vote/PASSED 
5/3/10 ATM 



110 



ARTICLE 1 5. Moved that the Town appropriate the funds necessary, by borrowing or 

otherwise, to fund and implement the collective bargaining agreements between the School Department 
personnel and the Town, which includes, but is not limited to, teachers, school administrators, custodians, 
cafeteria workers, and clerical employees for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2010, or take any action 
relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the School Committee 

Comment: The purpose of this Article is to fund the collective bargaining agreements 



Article 15 

Voted that action on this article be indefinitely postponed 
Majority Vote/PASSED 
5/3/10 ATM 



111 



ARTICLE 16. Moved that the Town take action in relation to the salaries of elected Town 

Officials for the ensuing year, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Comment: The statutes require that the Town vote to fix salaries of elected Officers 

annually. The appropriation is in Article 26. 

The Finance Committee recommends that the Town vote to fix salaries as follows: 
Constable $100 



Article 16 

Majority Vote/PASSED 
5/3/10 ATM 



112 



ARTICLE 17. Moved that the Town amend the Zoning By-Law, Article II, "Use, Dimensional and 

Timing Regulations" section 2.2.3.0, Table of Principal Uses, by inserting in subsection "F. INDUSTRIAL" 
the following language, "Renewable and Alternative Energy Research Facilities" and "N" in Districts A-1, 
A-2, A-3, B-1, B-2, B-3 and "Y" in District I; or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Renewable Energy Committee 

Comment: The article would allow "as of right" the construction of a Renewable and 
Alternative Energy Research Facility in the Town's Industrial Zone. 



Article 17 

Unanimous Vote/PASSED 
5/3/10 ATM 



113 



ARTICLE 18. Moved that the Town amend the Zoning By-Law, Article VI "Definitions", by 

inserting "Renewable and Alternative Research and Development Facilities: This use shall only include 
activities associated with research and development of services or products related to renewable and 
alternative energy";or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Renewable Energy Committee 

Comments: This article would define within the Zoning By-Law what a "Renewable and 
Alternative Research and Development Facilities" is. 



Article 18 

Unanimous Vote/PASSED 
5/3/10 ATIVI 



114 



ARTICLE 19. Moved that the Town transfer unexpended balances as shown on the books 

of the Town Accountant as of June 30, 2009, to the Surplus Revenue Accounts, or take any action 
relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Town Administrator 

Comment: This is a routine article to make use of funds, which were appropriated in prior 
fiscal years but not spent. Generally, such funds have been appropriated under Articles, other 
than the general budget, since unspent budget monies "expire" at the end of the year and 
become free cash. 



Article 19 

Voted that action on this article be indefinitely postponed 
Majority Vote/PASSED 
5/3/10 ATM 



115 



ARTICLE 20, Moved that the Town transfer funds from various Town accounts which have 

monies remaining therein to such other Town accounts which reflect a deficit, or tal<e any action relative 
thereto. 

Sponsored by the Town Administrator 

Comment: The purpose of this Article is to "capture" unexpended funds, which will remain in 
the various Town accounts as of June 30, 2010, which is the end of the fiscal year. Such monies 
could automatically flow into the Town's free cash, but would be not available to reduce the tax 
rate until the succeeding fiscal year, i.e., beginning July 1, 2011. These funds have already been 
appropriated and have been reflected in our current tax bills. 



Article 20 

Voted that action on this article be indefinitely postponed 
Majority Vote/PASSED 
5/3/10 ATM 



116 



ARTICLE 21 . Moved that the Town transfer $200,000 from the Surplus Revenue Account of 

the Town to the account of Current Revenue a sum of money to be used and applied by the Board of 
Assessors in the reduction of the tax levy, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Town Administrator 

Comment: Surplus revenue is money not set aside for any special purpose. It results from 
the difference between estimates and actual receipts of departmental collections and revenues 
(such as licenses, permits, etc.) plus unexpended funds from departmental budgets. When 
uncollected taxes are subtracted from surplus revenue, the total is "Free Cash". This is normally 
surplus revenue available for Town Meeting to be used to reduce taxes for the coming year. 



Article 21 

Majority Vote/PASSED 
5/3/10 ATIVI 



117 



ARTICLE 22. Moved that the Town authorize the continuation of the Council on Aging 

Revolving Account as authorized by Chapter 44, Section 53E1/2, of the Massachusetts General Laws, 
said account to be under the direction of the Council on Aging and used for the deposit of receipts 
collected through public donations; and further to allow the Council on Aging to expend funds not to 
exceed $30,000 for fiscal year 201 1 from said account for ongoing supplies and equipment. This would 
be contingent upon an annual report from the Council on Aging to the Town on the total receipts and 
expenditures of the Account each fiscal year, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Town Administrator 

Comment: The intent of this article is to promote good fiscal responsibility through the 
continuation of a petty cash account of monies received and paid out. The Council on Aging 
would also have the responsibility of reporting to the Town the total receipts and expenditures 
through this account each fiscal year. 

Motion made& seconded to combine the votes of Articles 22, 23 & 24/IVIajority vote, 5/3/10 



Article 22 

Majority Vote/PASSED 
5/2/10 ATM 



118 



ARTICLE 23. Moved that the Town authorize the continuation of the Recycling - Blue Bins 

Revolving Account as authorized by Chapter 44, Section 53E1/2, of the Massachusetts General Laws, 
said account to be under the direction of the Health Department and used for the deposit of receipts 
collected through the sale of recycling bins; and further to allow the Health Department to expend funds 
not to exceed $5,000 for fiscal year 2011 from said account for ongoing supplies and equipment. This 
would be contingent upon an annual report from the Health Department to the Town on the total receipts 
and expenditures of the Account each fiscal year, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Town Administrator 

Comment: The intent of this article is to allow funds received from recycling activities (e.g., 
sale of recycling bins) to be used solely for additional recycling and health activities. The Health 
Department would also have the responsibility of reporting to the Town the total receipts and 
expenditures through this account each fiscal year. 



Article 23 

Majority Vote/PASSED 
5/2/10 ATM 



119 



ARTICLE 24. Moved that the Town authorize the continuation of a Recreation Revolving 

Account as authorized by Chapter 44, Section 53E1/2, of the IVIassachusetts General Laws, said account 
to be under the direction of the Town Administrator and used for the deposit of receipts collected through 
user fees of recreation programs; and further, to allow the Town Administrator to expend funds not to 
exceed $150,000 for fiscal year 2011 from said account for ongoing supplies, salaries and equipment. 
This would be contingent upon an annual report from the Recreation Department to the Town on the total 
receipts and expenditures of the Account each fiscal year, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Town Administrator 

Comment: The intent of this article is to allow funds received from recreation activities to be 
used solely for additional recreation activities. The Town Administrator/Recreation Department 
would also have the responsibility of reporting to the Town the total receipts and expenditures 
through this account each fiscal year. 



Article 24 

Majority Vote/PASSED 
5/2/10 ATM 



120 



ARTICLE 25. Moved that the Town act on the report of the Finance Committee on the Fiscal 

Year 201 1 budget and to raise and appropriate or transfer from available funds money for the operation of 
the Town's Departments and the payment of debt service and all other necessary and proper expenses 
for the year, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Finance Committee 

Comment: The Finance Committee's recommendation will be the initial motion on the floor 
to deal with this budget. The budget as printed here will be amended to reflect any changes 
voted at this Town Meeting. The Moderator has traditionally allowed for discussion and 
reconsideration of each line item within this budget individually and in any order. 



Article 25 

Majority Vote/PASSED 
5/3/10 ATIVI 



121 



DEPARTMENTAL BUDGET 

July 1 , 2010 through June 30. 201 1 



Article 25 
Majority Vote 
5/3/10 ATM 



Department Administrator Finance Committee 





Approp. 




Approp. 


It 




Requested 


Recommended 




Recommended 




FY'09 




FY'IO 


No. 






FY'11 




FY'11 




FVII 












GENERAL GOV^RNMFNT 
























MODERATOR 














$ 




$ 






Expenses 


$ 




$ 




$ 




c 




c 








♦ 








t 














rlNANOc UUMIVil 1 ice: 
























Secretary 




_ 




_ 








200 




200 


1 


Expenses 




300 




300 




300 


$ 


200 


$ 


200 




Total Finance Committee Budget 


* 
♦ 


300 


$ 


300 


$ 


300 












SELECTMEN'S OFFICE 
















- 




- 




Board Expenses 




- 




- 




- 




7.500 




7,275 




Office Expenses 




8.000 




8.000 




8.000 




4,314 




4.500 




Mass. Municipal Assoc. 




4.750 




4.500 




4.500 




- 




- 




Union Related Expenses 




- 




- 




- 












Contingent 
















11 814 




11 775 


2 






12,750 




12,500 




12 500 


$ 


1l!814 


$ 


11,775 




Total Budget 


% 


12,750 


$ 


12,500 


$ 


12,500 












TOWN ADMINISTRATOR 
















124,614 




124.614 




Town Administrator 




129.915 




■ 129.915 




129.915 












Personnel Manager 
















44,791 




45.91 1 




Administrative Assistant 












46,830 
















1,300 




1.300 




1 300 


$ 


169,405 


$ 


170,525 


3 


Total Salaries 


$ 


178,045 


$ 


178.045 


$ 


178,045 


$ 


2,400 




2.400 


4 


Expenses 




2.750 




2.750 




2,750 


$ 


171,805 


$ 


172,925 




Total Town Administrator Budget 


$ 


180,795 


$ 


180,795 


$ 


180,795 












LAW DEPARTMENT 
















on r\f\n 




on Ann 


C 


Town Counsel Contract Expense 




90.000 




90.000 




on nnn 


$ 


80,000 


% 


80,000 




Total Law Budget 


$ 


90,000 


$ 


90,000 


$ 


90,000 












PARKING? PI PRK 






















6 


Salary 












■ 




7,500 




7,000 


7 


Expenses 




8.000 




8.000 




8,000 


$ 


7,500 


$ 


7,000 




Total Parking Clerk Budget 


$ 


8,000 


$ 


8,000 


$ 


8,000 












WORKERS' COMPENSATION 
















110,000 




110,000 




Expenses (Police 8i Fire) 




120.000 




120.000 




120,000 




180,000 




180,000 




Benefits/Insurance 




180,000 




180.000 




180,000 


$ 


290,000 


$ 


290,000 


8 


Total Workers' Comp Budget 


$ 


300,000 


$ 


300,000 


$ 


300,000 












PERSONNEL 
















41.235 




43,478 




Personnel Manager 




43,478 




43,478 




43.478 












Assistant 
















1.350 




1.052 




Other Compensation 




1,052 




1.052 




1.052 


$ 


42,585 




44.530 


9 


Total Salaries 




44,530 




44.530 




44.530 




2,000 




1.800 


10 


Expenses 




1,800 




1.800 




1.800 



% 44,585 S 46,330 Total Personnel Budget $ 46,330 $ 46,330 $ 46,330 



122 















Administrator 


Finance Committee 


Approp. 




Approp. 


It 




Requested 


Recommended 


Recommended 


FY'09 




FV10 


No. 




FY'll 




FV11 




FY'11 










ACCOUNTING DEPARTMENT 












86 961 




89 135 




Accountsnt 


89,135 




QQ -lie 




fio lie 


43 775 




44 870 




Asst. Town Accountsnt 


44,870 




44.870 




44,870 


3 400 




3 400 




Other CompGnsation 


3,400 




3.400 




3.400 


134 136 




137 405 


1 ■) 


TotsI Sal3ri6S 


137,405 




137,405 




137,405 


110.000 




15o!oOO 


12 


Uncompensated Balances 


150,000 




135.000 




135,000 










Salary Reserve 












8,000 




6,000 




Office Expenses 


6.500 




6.500 




6.500 


3,500 




3,500 




Educational Expense 


3.500 




3.500 




3,500 


8,000 




8,000 




Outside Services 


8,250 




8,250 




8,250 


iQ linn 




17 500 


13 


Trifal pYnpn^es 


18 250 




18,250 




18,250 


i 263 636 


< 


304 905 




TotsI Accounting Budget 


$ 305,655 


$ 


29o!655 


$ 


29o!655 










TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT 












5.200 




5.200 


14 


Network Specialist 


5,200 




5 200 




5 200 


93,500 




90,600 




Outside Services 


91.775 




91,775 




91 775 


3,500 




3,250 




Supplies 


3,250 


















Educational Expense 












Q7 Ann 




ocn 

9,9, OOv 


15 




95 025 




91 775 




91 775 






99 050 




Tntal TAfhiinlorfi/ RiiHnAt 




) 


96 975 


t 
♦ 


96 975 










TREASURER/COLLECTOR 




















1 iCaaUICI 


72 819 




72,819 




72,819 


•rO,/ /O 




44 870 






45 768 




45,768 




45,768 


84 067 




86 169 






88 775 




88 775 




88,775 


2 200 




3 250 






4 250 




4,250 




4,250 


9ni ARC 




207 108 


16 




211 612 




211,612 




211,612 


10.750 




5,000 




Office Expenses 


5,000 




5,000 




5.000 


2,250 




500 




Travel/Seminars 


500 




500 




500 










Tax Title 


5.000 




5,000 




5,000 


37,000 




40,000 




Postage 


40.000 




45,000 




45,000 


2,500 




_ 




Bank Service Fees 












52,500 




45,500 


17 


Total Expenses 


50,500 




99,dUU 




re cAA 
Od,!>UU 


$ 253,585 




252,608 




Total Treasurer/Collector BudQet 


$ 262,112 


$ 


267,112 




267,112 










TOWN CLERK 












52 427 




53 738 






53 738 




53,738 




53,738 






no, 






44 388 




44.388 




44,388 


7 200 




3 000 




Pnli Workers 


8 500 




8.500 




8,500 


1 500 




450 






450 




450 




450 


2 000 




2 000 






2 000 




2.000 




2,000 


$ 105,161 


$ 


103,140 


18 


Total Salaries . 


$ 109,076 


$ 


109,076 


$ 


109,076 






" 




Town Postage Account* 


■ 


















*IUInv/oH in TrASCCiiror/r^nll^r^nr DiiHnAt 
IVIUVCU lu 1 ICdaaulci/oullcl'lUI DUUycl 




















Machine Preparation 












4,000 




3.880 




Office Expenses 


3,880 




3,880 




3,880 


2,600 




2,425 




Town Meeting 


2.425 




2.425 




2,425 


9,000 




8.500 




Election Expenses 


8.500 




8,500 




8,500 


1,750 




750 




Travel/Seminars 


750 




750 




750 


17,250 




15,555 


19 


Total Expenses 


15,555 




15,555 




15,555 


$ 122,411 


$ 


118,695 




Total Clerk Budget 


$ 124,631 


$ 


124,631 


$ 


124,631 



123 















Department 


Administrator 


Finance Committee 




Approp. 




Approp. 


It 




Requested 


Recommended 




Recommended 




FY"09 




FY'10 


No. 




FY'11 




FV11 




FY'11 












ASSESSOR'S 














57 500 




5S 938 




Assistsnt AssGssor 


58,938 








CO Q'ao 




64 067 




87 904 




Clerical (2) 


88,775 




88 775 




00, 1 10 




7 000 




7 790 




Olhsr Compsnsation 


14.164 




7,800 




7 Rnn 


♦ 


128,567 


$ 


154,632 


20 


Total Salaries 


# 101,0/ 1 


< 




c 














Board Expenses 














1.000 




1,000 




Appellate Tax Board 


1,000 




1,000 




1,000 




1,500 




1,500 




Office Expenses 


1.500 




1,500 




1.500 












Travel 














1,000 




1,000 




Education/Professional Development 


1,000 




1,000 




1,000 




3 500 




3 500 


21 


Total Expenses 


3,500 




3,500 




3,500 




9,000 




9,000 


22 


Outside Services 


19,000 




19,000 




19,000 


$ 


141,067 


$ 


167,132 




Total Assessor's Budget 


184,377 




178,013 




178,013 












ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 














3,000 




3,000 


23 


Secretary 


2.000 




2,000 




2,000 




5,500 




5,200 


24 


Expenses 


6,180 




6,180 




6,180 


$ 


8,500 


$ 


8,200 




ToUl ZBA Budget 


$ 8,180 


$ 


8,180 


$ 


8,180 












PLANNING 














35,806 








Town Planner 






- 








1 500 




1 500 




Secretary 


2,000 




2,000 




2,000 




37,306 




1,500 


25 


Total Salaries 


2,000 




2,000 




2,000 




1,420 




800 




Expenses 


808 




808 




808 




1,435 




1,200 




Professional Develop/Memberships 


- 




- 




- 




2,855 




2,000 


26 


Total Expenses 


808 




808 




808 


$ 


40,161 


$ 


3,500 




Total Planning Budget 


$ 2,808 


$ 


2,808 


% 


2.808 












INSURANCE 














4,325,000 




4,170,000 




Employee Group-Health 


4,250,000 




4,201.000 




4,201,000 




285,000 




275,000 




Property 8i Casualty Insurance 


290,000 




290,000 




290,000 


$ 


4,610,000 


$ 


4,445,000 


27 


Total Insurance Budget 


% 4,540,000 


$ 


4,491,000 


% 


4,491,000 












PENSIONS 






















CONTRIBUTORY RETIREMENT' 














2,851,309 




3,190,209 


28 


Pension Contribution 


3,268,512 




3,268.512 




3,2dB,3 12 


$ 


2,851,309 


$ 


3,190,209 




Total Budget 


$ 3,268,512 


$ 


3,268,512 


$ 


3,268,512 












NON-CONTRIBUTORY PENSIONS 














212,000 




182,017 


29 


Pension Contribution 


168,500 




168,500 




168,500 


$ 


212,000 


$ 


182,017 




Total Budget 


$ 168,500 


$ 


168,500 


$ 


168,500 


$ 


3,063,309 


$ 


3,372,226 




Total Pensions 


$ 3,437,012 


$ 


3,437,012 


% 


3,437,012 


$ 


9.210,773 


$ 


9,379,546 




TOTAL GENERAL GOVERNMENT 


$ 9,603,175 


$ 


9,534,311 


$ 


9,534,311 



124 









Department 


Administrator 


Finance Committee 


Approp. 


Approp. 


It 


Requested 


Recommended 


Recommended 


FY'09 


PT'IO 


No. 


FY'11 


FY" 11 


FY"11 






Public Protection 












POLICE DEPARTMENT 








105,121 


105,121 


Chief (1) 


106,697 


106,697 


106,697 


75,788 


77,316 


Captain (1) 


77,316 


77,316 


77.316 


252,624 


257.720 


Lieutenants (4) 


257,720 


257,720 


257.720 


344,490 


351,438 


Sergeants (6) 


351.438 


351,438 


351.438 


1,005,692 


964,420 


Patrolmen (19) 


982,521 


982,521 


982.521 


49,251 


25,495 


Administrative Assistants (.5) 


51,755 


25,878 


25,878 


10.000 


10,000 


Matrons 


10,000 


10.000 


10,000 


325,000 


375,000 


Vacation/Overtime 


375,000 


395,000 


395,000 


100,575 


101,504 


Holidays 


104,123 


104,123 


104.123 


13.461 


10,431 


Investigations/ID 


14,831 


14,831 


14,831 


322,541 


326,790 


Educational Incentive 


328,625 


328,625 


328,625 


138,842 


158,633 


Differential 


163,904 


163,904 


163,904 


107.000 


107,000 


Other Compensation 


107.000 


107,000 


107,000 


- 


- 


Contingent Appropriation 


- 


- 


- 


2,850,385 


2,870,868 


30 Salary Subtotal 


2,930,930 


2,925,053 


2,925,053 






Selective Enforcement 


- 


- 








School Traffic Supervisors 






- 


2,850,385 


2,870,868 


Total Salaries 


2,930,930 


2,925,053 


2,925,053 


30,000 


28,000 


Building Expenses 


33,500 


32.000 


32,000 


12,000 


9.000 


Office Expenses 


10.000 


10,000 


10.000 






Travel 








42,000 


37.000 


Equipment Maintenance 


37.000 


37.000 


37.000 


12.000 


9,000 


Mobile Radio 


9.000 


9,000 


9.000 


10,000 


8.000 


Police Training 


9.000 


9,000 


9.000 




oft nnn 


Uniforms 


OQ rtnn 
Zo.UUU 


zo.UUU 


OR nnn 

ZD.UUU 






Bullet Proof Vests 








- 


- 


Computer Maintenance/Supplies 


- 


- 


- 


138,000 


119,000 


31 Total Expenses 


126,500 


125,000 


125,000 


29,000 


- 


32 Police Vehicles 


- 


- 


- 


3,017,385 


$ 2,989,868 


Total Police Budget 


$ 3,057,430 


$ 3,050,053 


$ 3,050,053 






FIRE DEPARTMENT 








103.081 


100.850 


Chief (1) 


100,850 


100.850 


100.850 


75,586 


77,066 


Deputy Chief (1) 


77,066 


77,066 


77.066 


265,775 


271,596 


Captains (4) 


272.396 


272,396 


272,396 


233,457 


239,294 


Lieutenants (4) 


239.294 


239.294 


239,294 


1,283,271 


1.250.645 


Fire Fighters (24) 


1,258,944 


1.258,944 


1,258,944 


5,536 


5.674 


Office Clerk 


5,674 


5,674 


5,674 


5,536 


5.674 


Mechanic 


5,674 


5.674 


5,674 


180,000 


200.000 


Minimum Manning Including OT. & Vacation 


250,000 


250,000 


250.000 


113,168 


112.662 


Holidays 


113.295 


113.295 


113.295 


23,000 


10.000 


Injury Leave 


10.000 


10.000 


10,000 


43.355 


43.355 


Personal Time 


43,355 


43,355 


43,355 


58,848 


58,736 


Shift Differential /Night 


58,736 


58,736 


58,736 


98,079 


97.608 


Shift Differential/Weekend 


97,608 


97.608 


97,608 


15,750 


13.600 


Clothing Allow^ance 


13.600 


13.600 


13,600 


22,950 




Longevity 


28.500 


28.500 


28,500 






EMT Stipend 








10,000 


4.000 


Out of Grade Pay 


4.020 


4.020 


4,020 


- 


- 


Defibrillator Stipend 


- 


- 


- 


27,500 


20,000 


Sick Leave Buy Backs 


20.000 


20.000 


20,000 


2,564,892 


2,534,283 


33 Total Salaries 


2,599.012 


2,599,012 


2,599,012 


36,000 


36,000 


Building Expenses 


36.000 


36,000 


36,000 


5,460 


3,799 


Office Expenses 


3,800 


3,800 


3,800 


1,500 


500 


Travel 


500 


500 


500 


32,000 


30,000 


Maintenance 


32,500 


32,500 


32.500 


4,500 


4,500 


Communications 


4,500 


4,500 


4.500 


4,000 


2,500 


Fire Prevention 


2,500 


2,500 


2,500 


3,000 


2.000 


Fire Hose 


2,000 


2,000 


2,000 






Fire Investigations 








86,460 


79,299 


34 Total Expenses 


81,800 


81,800 


81,800 


23.000 


14,000 


35 Protective Clothing 


14,000 


14,000 


14,000 


78,800 


78,000 


36 Lynn Dispatch/Mutual Aid 


78,000 


78,000 


78,000 


27,500 


15,000 


37 Training 


15,000 


15,000 


15,000 


$ 2,780,652 


$ 2,720,582 


Total Fire Budget 


$ 2,787,812 


$ 2,787,812 


$ 2,787,812 



125 















Department 


Administrator 


Finance Committee 




Approp. 




Approp. 


It 




Requested 


Recommended 




Recommended 




FY'09 




FY'10 


No. 




FVII 




FY'11 




FY'11 












HARBORMASTER 














6,832 




6,832 


38 


Salary 


6,832 




6,832 




6,832 




2,700 




2,700 


39 


Expenses 


3,700 




3,500 




3,500 




9,532 


$ 


9,532 




Total Harbormaster Budget 


$ 10,532 


$ 


10,332 


$ 


10,332 












EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 














1,000 




1,000 


40 


Director 


1,000 




1,000 




1,000 




1,250 




1,182 


41 


Expenses 


2,200 




2,000 




2,000 


$ 


2,250 


$ 


2,182 




Total Emergency Mngtmt Budget 


$ 3,200 


$ 


3,000 


$ 


3,000 












WEIGHTS & MEASURES 














5,000 




5,000 


42 


Inspector 


5,000 




5,000 




5,000 




- 




- 




Expenses 


- 








- 








* 




Travel 






- 














43 


Total Expenses 







- 




- 


$ 


5,000 


$ 


5,000 




Total Weight's & Measures Budget 


$ 5,000 


$ 


5,000 


$ 


5,000 












CONSTABLE 












$ 


100 


$ 


100 


44 


Salaries 


$ 100 


$ 


100 


$ 


100 


$ 


100 


$ 


100 




Total Constable Budget 


$ 100 


$ 


100 


$ 


100 












BUILDING DEPARTMENT 














72.169 




73.974 




Building Inspector 


74,774 




73.974 




73,974 




. 








Local Inspector 














20,720 




20,720 




Plumbing Inspector 


20,720 




20,720 




20,720 




20,720 




20.720 




Wire Inspector 


20,720 




20,720 




20,720 












Fire AJarm Inspector 






- 








1,000 




1.000 




Assistant Electric Inspector 


1,000 




1.000 




1,000 




- 




- 




Traffic Light Inspector 


- 




- 




- 




1,000 




1.000 




Assistant Plumbing Inspector 


1,000 




1,000 




1,000 




42,034 




43,952 




Clerical 


44.502 




44,388 




44,388 




- 




- 




Town Planner 


" 












1.100 




1,350 




Other Compensation 


2.000 




2,000 




O rtArt 

2,UO0 




158,743 




162,716 


45 


Total Salaries 


164,716 




163,802 




163,802 




6,000 




5,000 




Expenses 


5,000 




5.000 




5,000 




500 




300 




Travel/Seminars 


300 




300 




300 












Alarm Maintenance 














6,500 




5,300 


46 


Total Expenses 


5,300 




5,300 




5,300 


$ 


165,243 


$ 


168,016 




Total Building Budget 


$ 170,016 


$ 


169,102 


$ 


169,102 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



$ 


11,588 


$ 


1,500 


47 Town Planner/Conservation Agent Secretary 




1.500 




1,500 




1.500 


$ 


1.120 


$ 


800 


Expenses 




800 




800 




800 


$ 


800 


$ 


800 


Professional Develop/Memberships 




800 




800 




800 


$ 


1,920 


$ 


1,600 


48 Total Expenses 


$ 


1,600 


$ 


1,600 


$ 


1,600 


$ 


13,508 


$ 


3,100 


Total Conservation Budget 


$ 


3,100 


$ 


3,100 


$ 


3,100 


$ 


5,993,670 


$ 


5,898,380 


Total Public Protection 


% 


6,037,190 


% 


6,028,499 


$ 


6,028,499 



126 



Department Administrator Finance Committee 
Approp. Approp. It Requested Recommended Recommended 
FY'09 FY'10 No. FY'11 FVH FY'11 



Health and Sanitation 
HEALTH DEPARTMENT 





57,977 




59.717 




Health Officer 




59.717 




59.717 




59,717 




21 840 




15.000 




Health Nurse 




19.000 




18,000 




18,000 




42 034 




43,952 




Clerical 




44,388 




45,738 




45,738 




7 100 




7 500 




Anirnal Control Officer's Salary 




12,000 




9 500 




12 900 




1 850 




2 400 








2 600 




2 650 




2 650 




130,801 




128,569 


49 


Total Salaries 




137,705 




135,605 




139,005 




2.500 




2,425 




Office Expenses 




2.455 




2.425 




2,425 












Travel 
















2,500 




2,425 


50 


Total Expenses 




2,455 




2,425 




2,425 








3 500 


51 






3 545 




3 500 




3 500 




2,000 




1,900 


52 


Tests/state Charges 




1,925 




1.900 




1.900 












Animal Control Expenses 
















750 




700 




ACO Expenses 




710 




700 




700 




2,000 




1,940 




Boarding Animals/Pound/Supplies 




1,965 




1.965 




1,965 




2,750 




2,640 


53 


Subtotal Animal Control Expenses 




2,675 




2,665 




2,665 




932,000 




941,000 


54 


Rubbish and Recyclables Collections 




963,000 




963.000 




963,000 




1 074 051 


t 
▼ 


1 080 034 




Total Health Budget 


$ 


1,111,305 


$ 


1,109,095 


$ 


1,112,495 


$ 


1,074,051 


$ 


1,080,034 




TOTAL HEALTH AND SANITATION 


$ 


1.111,305 


$ 


1,109,095 


$ 


1,112,495 












Public Works 
























WAGES - General 
























Standby 
























Part-Time Labor 
























Fish House Custodian 
















7 500 




7 500 




Overtime 




7,500 




7 500 




7 500 












Clothing Allowance 
















3,750 




5 000 




Police Details 




5,000 




5.000 




5,000 












Shift Differential 
























Other Compensation 
















307,270 




269,208 




Personnel 




Off"? OOrt 

267,820 




267.820 




267,820 


* 


318,520 


» 


281,708 


55 


Total Salaries - General 


t 
* 


280,320 


* 


10A fin 
280,320 


$ 


280,320 












EXPENSES - General 
















55,000 




55.000 




Operating Expenses & Supplies 




55,000 




55.000 




60,000 




10,000 




10,000 




Operating Expense Electric-Fish House 




10,000 




10.000 




10,000 




10,000 




5.000 




Operating Expense-Fish house 




5,000 




5,000 




5,000 




2 500 




2 500 




V^^UI 1 II 1 lUI II^^OUUI l9 




2 500 




2 500 




2 500 




36.500 




35.000 




Equipment Maintenance 




35,000 




35,000 




35,000 




2,000 




2,000 




Signs 




2,000 




2,000 




2,000 




25.000 




35.000 




Administration Building 




35,000 




35,000 




35.000 








10,000 




Fuel 




10,000 




10,000 




10.000 




2.000 




1,000 




Uniforms 




1,000 




1,000 




1.000 




143,000 




155,500 


56 


Expenses Subtotal 




155,500 




155,500 




160,500 




75.000 




75.000 


57 


Snow & Ice 




125.000 




125,000 




125.000 




25.000 




25.000 


58 


Highway Maintenance 




25,000 




25.000 




25,000 


% 


243,000 


$ 


255,500 




Total Expenses - General 


$ 


305,500 


$ 


305,500 


( 


310,500 


$ 


561,620 


$ 


537,208 




Total Budget - O.P.W. General 


$ 


585,820 


$ 


585,820 


$ 


590,820 



127 



Department Administrator Finance Committee 
Approp. Approp. It Requested Recommended Recommended 





FY*09 




FY'10 


No. 






FY'11 




FY'11 




FY'11 












WAGES - Sewer 
















372,489 




331,370 




Personnel 




267,820 




267,820 




267,820 




27.000 




27.000 




Standby 




27,000 




27,000 




27,000 




5,000 




5,000 




Sewer Bloclcs 




5,000 




5,000 




5,000 




- 




' 




Meter Readers 




- 




■ , 




- 




3,750 




3.750 




Police Details 




3,750 




3,750 




3,750 




* 








Part-Time Labor 




~ 




- 








31,500 




31,500 




Overtime 




31,500 




31,500 




31,500 




- 




- 




Other Compensation 




- 




- 




- 


$ 


439,739 


$ 


398,620 


59 


Total Salaries - Sewer 


$ 


335,070 


$ 


335,070 


$ 


335,070 












EXPENSES - Sewer 
















100,000 




100,000 




Lift Station Operation & Maintenance 




100,000 




100,000 




100,000 




40,000 




40,000 




Fuel 




40,000 




40,000 




40,000 




70,000 




70,000 




Electric 




70,000 




70,000 




70,000 




40,000 




40,000 




Operating Expenses & Supplies 




40,000 




40,000 




40,000 




15,000 




15,000 




Equipment Maintenance 




15,000 




15,000 




15,000 




~ 




' 




Communications 












■ 












Sewer Bills 




" 












2,600 




2,600 




Uniforms 




2,600 




2,600 




2,600 




825,000 




825,000 




Lynn Sewer 




875,000 




875,000 




875,000 




1,092,600 




1,092,600 


60 


Expenses Subtotal 




1,142,600 




1,142,600 




1,142,600 










O 1 


Sewer System Maintenance 




















25,000 


62 


otWtK KtbtKvt rUNLJ 




25,000 




25,000 




25,000 




375,000 




380,000 




Indirect Costs 




380,000 




380,000 




380,000 




17,500 




17,500 




Administration 




17,500 




17,500 




17.500 




95,493 




86,939 




Pension 




113,142 




113,142 




113.142 




218,500 




166,121 




Principal 




197,805 




197,805 




197,805 




26,205 




27,982 




Interest 




28,359 




28,359 




28,359 










63 






/ OQ,OUQ 




1 00,OUD 




7^e fine 


$ 


1,825,298 


S 


1,816,142 




Total Expenses - Sewer 


$ 


1 ,904,406 


$ 


1 ,904,406 


$ 


1,904,406 


$ 


2,265,037 


$ 


2,214,762 




Total Budget - Sewer Entrprise Fund 


$ 


2,239,476 


$ 


2,239,476 


$ 


2,239,476 












Funded by Sewer Revenue 
























WAGES - Water 
















371,976 




342,365 




Personnel 




346,534 




346,534 




346,534 




27,000 




27,000 




Standby 




27,000 




27,000 




27,000 




5,000 




5.000 




Flushing 




5,000 




5,000 




5,000 




" 




~ 




Meter Readers 




* 




' 




" 




7,000 




7.000 




Police Details 




7,000 




7,000 




7.000 




- 




- 




Part-Time Labor 




- 




- 




- 




24,500 




24,500 




Overtime 




24,500 




24,500 




24,500 




'— 




— 




Other Compensation 














$ 


435,476 


$ 


405,865 


64 


Total Salaries - Water 


$ 


410,034 


$ 


410,034 


$ 


410,034 












HArcNoco -> water 




















An Ann 




Fuel 








Ar\ nnn 




Aci nnn 




fic rtnn 








Operating Expenses & Supplies 




85,000 




oO,UUU 




oc nnn 

03,UUU 




15,000 




15,000 




Equipment Maintenance 




15,000 




15,000 




15,000 












Communications 
























Water Bills 




2,000 




^,UUU 




z,UUU 












Uniforms 




2,600 












1,434,210 




1,450,000 




MWRA 




1,600,000 




1,600,000 




1,500,000 




l,97o,01D 




1,094,ou0 




Expenses Subtotal 




1,744,600 




1,744,600 




1,644,600 










66 


Water System Improvements * 
























* New 565k per year on an interest free state program 
















25 000 


67 


WATER RESERVE FUND 




25.000 




25 000 




25 000 




375,000 




380,000 




Indirect Costs 




380,000 




380,000 




380,000 




81,615 




83,384 




Pension 




127.327 




127.327 




127,327 




758,906 




796,545 




Principal 




751,008 




751,008 




751,008 




53,727 




55,110 




Interest 




33,342 




33.342 




33,342 




1,269,248 




1,315,039 


68 


Indirect Expenses Subtotal 




1,291,677 




1,291,677 




1.291,677 


$ 


2,848,058 


$ 


2,934,639 




Total Expenses - Water 


$ 


3,061,277 


$ 


3,061,277 


$ 


2,961,277 


$ 


3,283,534 


$ 


3,340,504 




Total Budget - Water Enterprise Fund 


$ 


3,471,311 


( 


3.471,311 


$ 


3,371,311 












Funded by Water Revenue 














$ 


5,548,571 


$ 


5,555,266 




TOTAL WATER & SEWER BUDGET 


$ 


5,710,787 


$ 


5,710,787 


$ 


5,610,787 



128 



Department Administrator Finance Committee 





Approp. 




Approp. 


It 




Requested 


Recommended 




Recommended 




FY"09 




FVIO 


No. 






FY'11 




FY'11 




FY'll 












WAGES - Buildinas & Grounds 
















1,500 




1,500 




Overtime 




1,500 




1,500 




1,500 












Part-Time Labor 
















131,559 




116,219 




Personnel 




119,563 




119,563 




119,563 












Other Compensation 




- 




- 






$ 


133,059 


$ 


117,719 


69 


Total Salaries - Buildings & Grounds 


$ 


121,063 


$ 


121,063 


$ 


121,063 












EXPENSES - Buildings & Grounds 
























Board Expenses 




. 




. 








10,000 




10,000 




Operating Expenses & Supplies 




10,000 




10,000 




10.000 




7.000 




7,000 




Equipment Maintenance 




7,000 




7,000 




7,000 




1,000 




600 




Uniforms 




600 




600 




600 


$ 


18,000 


$ 


17,600 


70 


Total Expenses - Buildings & Grounds 


$ 


17,600 


$ 


17,600 


$ 


17,600 


$ 


151,059 


$ 


135,319 




Total Budget - DPW Buildings & Grounds 


$ 


138,663 


$ 


138,663 


$ 


138,663 












SPECIAL ACCOUNTS 
















4,000 




4,000 




St^ade Trees 




4,000 




4,000 




4,000 




io!ooo 




5,000 




Contract Work - trees 




5,000 




5,000 




5,000 




79,450 




88,450 




Contract Woric - grass 




88.450 




88,450 




88,450 




10.000 




8,000 




Contract Patching 




8.000 




8,000 




8,000 




10.000 




5,000 




Landscaping 




5.000 




5,000 




5,000 




40,000 




40,000 




Contract Wori<-sidewalks (includes schools) 




40.000 




40,000 




40,000 




10,000 




13,000 




Leaf Disposal 




13,000 




13,000 




13.000 


$ 


163,450 


$ 


163,450 


71 


Total Budget - D.P.W. Special Accts. 


$ 


163,450 


$ 


163,450 


$ 


163,450 


$ 


6,424,600 


$ 


6,391,243 




TOTAL PUBLIC WORKS 


$ 


6,598,720 


$ 


6,598,720 


$ 


6,503,720 












RECREATION 
























Coordinator 




- 




- 




_ 




- 




- 




Director 












- 




35,000 




31,500 




Other Salaries 




31,500 




31,500 




31.500 




35,000 




31,500 


72 


Total Salaries 




31,500 




31,500 




31,500 












Office Expenses 
























Travel 
























Program Expenses 






















73 


Total Expenses 














$ 


35,000 


$ 


31,500 




Total Recreation Budget 


$ 


31,500 


$ 


31,500 


$ 


31,500 



129 



Department Administrator Finance Committee 





Approp. 




Approp. 


It 




Requested 


Recommended 




Recommended 




FY-09 




Frio 


No. 






FY'11 




FY'11 




FY'11 












COUNCIL ON AGING 
















48,687 




43.648 




Director 




43,648 




43.648 




43,648 




13.507 




10.764 




Outreach Worker 




10.764 




10.764 




10.764 




12,977 




13,622 




Van Driver 




12.976 




12.976 




12.976 




75,171 




68,034 


74 


Total Salaries 




67,388 




67,388 




67,388 




17,172 




15.000 


75 


Program Coordinator 




15.000 




15,000 




15.000 




22.600 




22,600 


76 


Expenses 




30,255 




30.255 




30.255 


$ 


114,943 


$ 


105,634 




Total Council on Aging Budget 


$ 


112,643 


$ 


112,643 


$ 


112,643 












VETERANS' SERVICE 
















9,308 




9.308 


77 


Director's Salary 




9.308 




9.308 




9.308 




250 




150 




Office Expenses 




150 




150 




150 




1.500 




1,500 




Memorial Day 




1.500 




1.500 




1.500 




450 




450 




Veterans' Day 




550 




550 




550 




2,200 




2,100 


78 


Total Expenses 




2,200 




2,200 




2,200 




5.600 




5.500 


79 


Assistance 




5.500 




5.500 




5.500 


$ 


17,308 


% 


16,908 




Total Veteran's Budget 


$ 


17,008 


$ 


17,008 


$ 


17,008 












Maturinq Debt 
























NON-SEWER DEBT SERVICE 
















3.293.227 




3,625,825 




Principal 




3.688.710 




3.688.710 




3,688.710 




1,669,306 




1.757,780 




Interest 




1.376.635 




1.376.635 




1,376,635 




- 




- 




Temporary Loans - Interest 




- 




- 




- 




45.000 




30,000 




Certification of Notes/Bonds 




30,000 




30,000 




30.000 












Contingent Appropriation 




- 




- 






$ 


5,007,533 


$ 


5,413,605 


80 


Tot Budget-Non-Sewer Debt Serv. 


$ 


5,095,345 


$ 


5,095,345 


$ 


5,095,345 












SEWER DEBT SERVICE 
















1.034.968 




1.066.101 




Principal 




1,099.157 




1.099.157 




1.099.157 




95.136 




75.655 




Interest 




55,729 




55.729 




55,729 




8,211 




6.825 




Administrative Fees/Charges 




6.825 




6,825 




6.825 


$ 


1,138,315 


$ 


1,148,581 


81 


Total Budget - Sevi/er Debt Service 


$ 


1,161,711 


$ 


1,161,711 


$ 


1,161,711 


$ 


6,145,848 


$ 


6,562,186 




TOTAL MATURING DEBT 


$ 


6,257,056 


$ 


6,257,056 


$ 


6,257,056 












LIBRARY 
















63,770 




65,364 




Director 




65,364 




65,364 








46,023 




47.174 




Assistant Director 




47,174 




47,174 




A"? i "7 A 

4f .1 /4 




19,448 




18.876 




Secretary /Bookkeeper 




19,539 




19,539 




19,539 




Alt -1 DO 




AO ^TA 




Children's Librarian 




49,481 




49,481 




4y.4t51 




42,543 




44.044 




Circulation Librarian 




45 590 




45 590 




45,590 




49.522 




44 044 








45 590 




45 590 




45.590 




24,310 




25,169 




Cataloger 




26,052 




26,052 




26.052 




36.693 




36,059 




Library Assistants 




35 987 




35 987 




35.987 




40 652 




27 500 




Adult Assistants (part-tirne) 




34.024 




34.024 




34.024 




23!573 




22.666 




AV Processors 




24.151 




24,151 




24.151 




_ 








Pages 












_ 




15.443 




15.576 




Other Compensation 




16.543 




16.543 




16.543 




408,166 




394,746 


82 


Total Salaries 




409,495 




409,495 




409,495 




1,500 




1.200 




Office Expenses 




1.200 




1.200 




1.200 




30.000 




34.000 




Building Expenses 




36.000 




36,000 




36.000 




400 




400 




Travel 




400 




400 




400 




31,900 




35,600 


83 


Total Expenses 




37,600 




37,600 




37,600 




119.700 




125.000 


84 


Library Materials 




133.900 




133.900 




133.900 


$ 


559,766 


$ 


555,946 




Total Library Budget 


% 


580,995 


$ 


580,995 


$ 


580,995 



130 



Department Administrator Finance Committee 
Approp. Approp. It Requested Recommended Recommended 

FY'09 FY'10 No. FY'11 FY'11 FY'11 

UNCLASSIFIED 



3,500 


3,000 


85 


Town Reports 


3,000 


3,000 


3,000 


29 500 


29 500 


86 




29 500 


29 500 




165,000 


175,000 


87 


street Lighting 


180,000 


180,000 


180,000 


176,750 


182,500 


88 


Reserve Fund 


182,500 


175,000 


175,000 


45,000 


47,500 


89 


Audit 


50,000 


50,000 


50,000 


800 


800 


90 


IHistorical Commission 


800 


800 


800 


355,000 


365,650 


91 


Medicare Tax 


372,500 


372,500 


372,500 


70,000 


50,000 


92 


Stabilization Fund 


100,000 


100,000 


125,000 


15,000 






Unemployment 








25,000 






Town Building Study Committee 








885,550 $ 


853,950 




Total Unclassified Budget 


$ 918,300 $ 


910,800 $ 


935,800 



Schools 

$ 290,885 $ 394,091 93 REGIONAL VOCATIONAL SCHOOL $ 425,000 $ 425,000 $ 250,000 

94 SCHOOLS - SWAMPSCOTT 

22,200,000 22,600,000 Total Budget 22,895,000 23,020,000 23,020,000 

-_ Less Anticipated Rev.-Nahant, Metco, ... -_ -_ 

$ 22,200,000 $ 22,600,000 Net Budget $22,895,000 $ 23,020,000 $ 23,020,000 

$ 22,490,885 $ 22,994,091 TOTAL SCHOOLS $23,320,000 $ 23,445,000 23,270,000 

$ 52,952,394 % 53,868,818 TOTAL FY2011 BUDGET $54,587,892 $ 54,625,627 $ 54,384,027 



* Excludes Non Appropriated Expenses (i.e. State Assessments & Assessor's Overtay) of $1, 199, 1 42 

Total Town Budget including State Assessments and Assessor's Overlay and Net of Water/Sewer= $49,972,382 



131 



ARTICLE 26. Moved that the Town transfer from the Surplus Revenue Account of the Water 

Enterprise Fund to the account of Current Revenue the sum of $250,000 to be used and applied by the 
Board of Selectmen in the reduction of the water rate, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Comment: Surplus revenue is money not set aside for any special purpose. It results from 
the difference between estimates and actual receipts of water user fees and other revenues plus 
unexpended funds from the water department's budget. This is normally surplus revenue 
available for Town Meeting to be used to reduce rates for the coming year. 



Article 26 

Majority Vote/PASSED 
5/3/10 ATM 



132 



ARTICLE 27. Moved that the Town transfer from the Surplus Revenue Account of the Sewer 

Enterprise Fund to the account of Current Revenue the sum of $150,000 to be used and applied by the 
Board of Selectmen in the reduction of the sewer rate, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Selectmen 

Comment: Surplus revenue is money not set aside for any special purpose. It results from 
the difference between estimates and actual receipts of sewer user fees and other revenues plus 
unexpended funds from the sewer department's budget. This is normally surplus revenue 
available for Town Meeting to be used to reduce rates for the coming year. 



Article 27 

Majority Vote/PASSED 
5/3/10 ATM 



133 



ARTICLE 28. Moved that the Town appropriate and raise, by borrowing or otherwise, under 

any general or special law which authorizes the Town to raise money, by borrowing or otherwise, such 
sums of money as may be necessary for any and all of the purposes mentioned in the foregoing articles, 
or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 



Article 28 

Majority Vote/PASSED 
5/3/10 ATM 



Motion made and seconded to dissolve the Annual Town Meeting at 10:00 PM 
Majority Vote/PASSED 
5/3/10 ATM 



AUest: 

Susan J. Duplin 
Town Clerk 



134 



Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant with your doings thereon at the time and place of said 
meeting. 

Given under our hand this 6th day of April, 201 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 




135 



MAY 3, 2010 ATM 2010 Town Meeting Members 



Pre 


Name 






Adams, Ryan 


V 




Baldacci, Richard R 




Bartlett-Genest Lee 


V 


-1 


Blonder, Jeffrey S 


V 




Briones Jorge A Jr 


V 




Buchanan, Susan 






Cassidy, John 


/ 

V 




Chavez, Robert 


A 


Cresta, Gino A Jr 


V 




Dandreo, Robert 




1 


Davis Jeremy 


1 

V 


1 


DeFelice Nicholas 


V 




Delano, Francis III 






Dolan, Charles 


V 




Finlay Patricia 






Furnari, Ida 






Green Eileen 


J 

V 




Griffin, Alice 


/ 

V 




Harrington Nancy 


1 

V 




Harris Steve 






Hartmann, Eric 




' 


Hartmann, Marianne 




1 


Hyde, Sally A 






Hyde, William R Sr 


V 




Johnson Maryalice 


V 




Karametsopoulos Maria 


/ 

V 




Kearney Sheila 


V 




Kessler, Nelson 


V 




King, Stella 


V 




LeBlanc Dean 


1 

V 




Lombard James 




1 iMcMannGary 


V 


1 ' Mentuck Douglas 


; 

\ 




Miles, Chris 




Montague, Neil 


V 




Morse, Rhoda 


1 

V 




Patalano, Raymond 


V 




Patrikis, Theodore A. 


V 


1 jPicariello, John A 




1 iPicariello, Lawrence 


V 


1 1 Pierce Todd 






Powell Sally 






Pulos, Victoria 


V 




Rizzo, Carole 


V 




Rogers, Thomas 


>/ 




1 Rooks, Norma H 






i Scott, Digna 


i 

1 




Serino, Michael A 


1 




Serino, Robert 






Shannon Cynthia 


1 
I 


1 Shannon, Collin 




1 jSperanza, Frances 




1 Washburn, Kenneth 


1 Whittier, Douglas 


i 
I 



136 



MAY 3, 2010 ATM 



2010 Town Meeting Members 



Pre 


Name 




2 


Amore, Anthony 




2 


Garden, Eugene 


i 


2 


Bell, Robert 




2 


Bowen, David 




2 


Cameron, Janell A 


V 


2 


Caron, Mark R 


V 


2 


Carrigan Bacik Lisa 




2 


Casella, Mark 




2 


Chaisson George E 


V 


2 


Cooper, Robin 




2 


Crimmins Joseph 


V 


2 


Dion, Edward 


V 


2 


boherty, John J 


V 


2 


Dunn, Judith F 


V 


2 


Greene Rebecca 


V 


2 


Hamel, Gregg "J" 


V 


2 


Hebert, Donald 


V 


2 


Hebert, Janet 


V 


2 


Hunt Stephen 




2 


Jackson, Lorene 


V 


2 


Jackson, William 


V 


2 


Jones, Patrick 


V 


2 


Marcou, Martha L 




2 


McHugh, Donna 




2 


Morrell, Agatha 


V 


2 


Morris George 


V ; 


2 


Mulvey Edward 




2 , 


Murphy, Brian C 




2 


Newhall, Linda A 


V 


2 


Newhall, Walter 




2 


■ 

Palleschi, Edward 




2 


Pinkerton, Don 


V 


2 


Pitman, Michael 




2 


Ramstine Gregory 




2 


Ramstine, Patricia Karamas 


V 


2 


Richmond, David E 


V 


2 


Richmond, Jared 




2 


Romano, John L 




2 


Rosenberg, Gail 


V 


2 


Ruggiero John 


V 


2 


Ryan Leah 


V 


2 


Schultz, Jackson 


V 


2 


Schultz, Nancy 




2 


Scibelli, Anthony A 




2 


Shanahan, Joseph E Jr 




2 


Spritz Wayne 


V 


2 


Strauss, Danielle 


V 


2 


Strauss, Joshua A 




2 


Strauss, Matthew 


V 


2 


Swanstrom, Dana 


V 


2 


Vogel Kristen 


V 


2 


Vogel, John 


V 


2 


Whelan David Jr 




2 


Zamansky Elizabeth Belkin 





137 



MAY 3, 2010 ATM 



2010 Town Meeting Members 



Pre 


Name 




3 


Barden, Gary 


V 


3 


Bogardus, Deborah 




3 


Breen, Kevin F 


V 


3 


Breen, Leslie A 




3 


Cardenas Patricia 




3 


Champagne-O'Keefe Donna 


V 


3 


Coletti, John M 




3 


Cormier, Kathleen 


V 


3 


Dandreo, Daniel J III 




3 


Davey Maryann 


V 


3 


Davis, Deborah 


V 


3 


DePaolo Jan 




3 


DePaolo, George 


V 


3 


Dobias Robert J 


V 


3 


Domelowicz, Joseph J. Jr 


V 


3 


Donaher Karen 


V 


3 


Donaher, Kevin 


V 


3 


Driscoll, Anne 


V 


3 


Eldridge, Barbara F 


V 


3 


Eldridge, Scott 


V 


3 


Esteverena Catherine 




3 


Fitzhenry George 


V 


3 


Frenkel, Lenora 




3 


Frenkel, Richard 




3 


Gallagher, Tara 


V 


3 


Gibbons, Jarrod 


V 


3 


Grimes, Daniel 




3 


- 

Hilario Joan 


V 


3 


Jones, Patricia A 




3 


Kelleher, Martha G 




3 


Legere David 




3 


Lincoln Loring B Jr 




3 


Lincoln, Maria F 




3 


Luke Gerald 




3 


Magee, Kathleen 


V 


3 


McDonough, Mary G 


V 


3 


Meister Thelma Young 


3 


Moltz Sandra 


V 


3 


Moss, Evan 


V 


3 


O'Keefe Brian 


V 


3 


Patriarca, Michael 


V 


3 


Penyack, Jonathan 




3 


j Perry, Gerard D 




3 


!Pilotte Denis 




3 


jRyan George 




3 


1 Simons, Joseph B. 


V 


3 


'Smith Richard 


V 


3 


iSpellios, Peter A 




3 


Thomsen, Maureen 


V 


3 


Turner, Stephen 




3 


'Weaver David 


V 


3 


Webster, Mary 




3 


Welch Thomas 




3 


Wright, Suzanne 





138 



MAY 3, 2010 ATM 



2010 Town Meeting Members 



Pre 


Name 




4 


Baker, Janet N 




4 


{Balsama, Joseph J 




4 


Barden, Marc 


f 

V 


4 


Begin, Robert 


V 


4 


Brown Rachel 


V 


4 


Brown, Andrew 


V 


4 


Callahan John 


1 

V 


4 


Cunningham, Kelly 


V 


4 


Dansdill, Martha 


1 

V- 


4 


Dawley Thomas 


V 


4 


DeChillo, Mary H 


V 


4 


DiMento, William R 


V 


4 


Donelan, Robert E 




4 


Donnenfeld Neil 


1 

V 


4 


Dorsey Timothy J 


V 


4 


Dreeben, Naomi 




4 


Drummond, Brian 




4 


Drummond, Ellen M 




4 


Faico, Michael 


V 


4 


Fridman, Nanette R 


V 


4 


Goldman, Iris 




4 


Goudreau, Connie 




4 


Greehan, Kathleen M 




4 


Howe, Christopher 


V 


4 


Hughes, Nancy 




4 


Kane Richard M Jr 




4 


Keeter Terri 


V 


4 


Kinney Jacqueline (Jackie) 


V 


4 


Kraft, Richard 


V 


4 


Krippendorf, Edward W. Sr 




4 jLeger, Jeanne 


V 


4 Lord, Gary 


V 


4 


Lord, Nancy 


V 


4 


McClung Michael 


V 


4 jMcNerney, Cynthia 


V 


4 1 


Meninno, Christine 


V 


4 


Moynihan, John 




4 


O'Brien, Laurie 




4 


Paster Glenn 


V 


4 


Paster, Linda L 


V 


4 


Phelan John V IV 




4 


Phelan, John V III 


V 


4 


Powell, Amy 




4 


Reagan, John 




4 ;Resler, Henry 




4 Sarafini-Foley Phyllis 




4 Shanahan, Patricia D 




4 , 


Sheehan Neil G 




4 


Somer, Margaret 




4 i Stone, Myron S 


V 


4 Walsh, Karyn LK 




4 Watson Brian T 




4 


Withrow Mary Susan 




4 


Wynne, Katie 


V 



139 



MAY 3, 2010 .ATM 



2010 Town Meeting Members 



Pre 


Name 




5 


Akim, Marta 




5 : 


Belhumeur, Cynthia Hatch 




5 Belhumeur, R. Thomas 




5 ! Bernstein, Neil S 


V 


5 


Callahan, Michael 


V 


5 i 


Caplan, Edward 


V 


5 Carangelo, Lisa 


1 

V 


5 : 


Carden, John 


/ 

V 


5 


Cerra Anthony J 


V 


5 • 


Chapman, Randy 




5 


Epstein, Jay 


V 


5 ' 


Fletcher, Mary Ellen 


5 Forman Amy 


f 

V 


5 


Forman, Adam 




5 j 


Forman, Joshua 


V 


5 


Gallo, Elizabeth (Betty Ann) 


V 


5 1 Graham, David 


V 


5 Grant, Kenneth 


V 


5 i 


Greenfield, Barry 




I i 


Hartmann, Jill 


V 




Hennessey, William F 




5 i 


Hodgkin, Doreen L 


1 

V 


5 ! 


Hyman, Merle 


V 


5 \ 


Ippolito, Angela 


1 

V 


5 , 


Jaffa, Sharon Tripolsky 


V 


5 ! 


Keller, Ellen Long 




5 \ 


Lawler, Jack 




5 iLawler, Sami 




5 


Lipson Philip 


i 

V 


5 


Malagrifa, Richard 


V 


5 


Mazow Robert E 




5 


Nellis, Veeder C 




5 


O'Neill Thomas J 




5 


Patkin, Marjorie 


V 


5 


Patkin, Randall 


V 


5 


Pye, Darlene 


V 


5 


Rogers, Roberta 


1 

V 


5 


Rooks George 


V 


5 


Rooks, Ruth K 


V 


5 


Rossman Neil 




5 


Rubin, Gayle 


V 


5 


Shore Geraldine 


1 

V 


5 


Sneirson, Gerald (Jerry) 


V 


5 


Steinman, Roy H 




5 


Sullivan, Jill 


/ 

V 


5 


Talkov, Roger 


1 


5 


Van Dam David S 




5 


Van Der Burg Joanne 




5 


Van Der Burg Linso 


V 


5 


Welner, Lawrence J 




5 


Whear, Bruce 




5 


Wollerscheid, William L 


i 

V 


5 


Zarinsky, Irma W Dr 


IV 


5 


Zeller, Virginia 


/ 



140 



MAY 3, 2010 ATM 



2010 Town Meeting Members 



Pre 


;Name 




6 


Baker, Robert A 


V 


6 


i ■ - 

Beaupre, Laurier 


V 


6 


Beermann Jack M 


V 


6 


iBelkin, Sylvia B 




6 


Block Lawrence S 


V 


6 


Breen Jeanne 


1 

V 


6 


Burke Scott D 




6 


Camerlengo Ralph (Vinnie) 


V 


6 


Cronin, Michael 


V 


6 


Dembowski, Claire C 




6 


DeVellis, Daniel D 


V 


6 


Driscoll, Thomas H Jr. Esq 




6 


Drucas, Chris 




6 


Eriich Norman 




6 


Folta, Rand 


V 


6 


Frisch, Peter 


V 


6 


Gold Anne Ward 


f 


6 


Goldman, Jeff 




6 


Goldman, Martin C 


1 

V 


6 


Gupta, Mary Kelly 


1 

V 


6 


Healey, Thomas J 




6 


Hickey, Lisa A 


V 


6 


Horwitz Kravtin, Patricia 


1 

V 


6 


Jacobs, Susan 




6 


Jakious, Richard 




6 


Kane John C. Jr 




6 


Kane, Susan 


1 

V 


6 


Leamon, Jonathan 




6 


Levenson, Paul E Esq 




6 


Levenson, Sheryl 




6 


Locke Judith E 




6 


Markanan, Joe 


1 

V 


6 


McDermott, Marianne 


V 


6 


Merkle, Cynthia 




6 


O'Hare Mary Michael 




6 


Paster Ruth 




6 


Paster, Marc 




6 


Pitman, Martha B M.D. 


i 

V 


6 


Poster, Eugene L 


1 

V 


6 


Rotner, Kim 


1 

V 


6 


Rotner, Philip 


1 

V 


6 


Ryan, Daniel 


1 

■V 


6 


Ryan, Mary Ann 


V 


6 


Ryan, William 


V 


6 


Sackett, Shelley A 


V 


6 


Seligman Edward 


V 


6 


Shutzer, Carole B 




6 


Shutzer, Kenneth B 


V 


6 


Tennant, Cynthia P 




6 


Walker, Eric 




6 


Whitman, Andrew S 


/ 


6 


Witt Sherne L. 


V 


D 


Yaeger, uan 


,/ 


6 


Yaeger, Lisa L 


V 



I 



141 



TOWN COLLECTOR and COLLECTOR OF TAXES 




. Denise M. Dembkoski 






IN APrOl INT WITH THF TOWN OF ^^WAMP'^rOT" 

1 IN rAV_> WV_/LJ 1 Nl Willi IIIC 1 W WIN Wl O V V AAI vl 1 \D\^\J 1 


■-07/01/09 TO 06/30/10 






^ - - - 


Keai estate i axes 


$ 


39,207,375.43 


r ersonai r ropeny i axes 


<c 
ip 


QW^ Q 
yOo,D 1 y .'f^ 


Tax Title/Deferred Tax Collections 


$ 


571,166.80 


Automobile Excise Taxes 


$ 


1,794,128.16 


vvater/oewer L/Oiieciions 


$ 


5,419,370.75 


Harbor Mooring Fees 


$ 


17,583.95 


Boat Excise Taxes 




1 U,0/i!:. 1 U 


/VOtt7. 






inwresucnarges/ueiTidnu lees are inciuueQ in doove Tigures 




-- - — 


Rentals (Fish House, C&L, Yacht Club) 


$ 


45,120.32 


P.I.L.O.T. Payments 


$ 


8,075.00 


Non-Contributory Reimbursements 


$ 


19,571.64 


r^pll Tnwpr 1 Pi^QPQ 


$ 


91,313.33 


Fees for preparing Certificates of Municipal Lien 


$ 


12,350.00 


Total Collected - July 1 , 2009 to June 30, 2010 


$ 


48,180,046.92 



142 



SWAMPSCOTT CONSERVATION COMMISSION 
JULY 8, 2009 

A discussion was held about the continuance of a Preston Beach project pertaining to 
maintenance of existing riprap. 

A discussion was held for a potential request of emergency status at 22 Northstone Road. 
JULY 22, 2009 

A public hearing was continued regarding revisions to a Notice of Intent for continual 
maintenance of the existing riprap in front of the existing seawall on 2 to 32 Preston Court. 

A discussion was held about revetment repair/maintenance on 22 Northstone Road. 
AUGUST 5, 2009 

An Order of Conditions was issued to the Swampscott Yacht Club. 

A discussion was held about a Notice of Intent for replacement of existing sea stairs for sea wall 
on 201 Humphrey Street. 
SEPTEMBER 9, 2009 

A public hearing was held about a Notice of Intent filed by Cinder McNerney for the replacement 
of sea stairs. 

A public hearing was held about an Order of Conditions for a Preston Beach Owners Association 
Trust (PBOAT) project. 
SEPTEMBER 23, 2009 

An Order of Conditions was issued for the replacement of existing sea stairs at the property of 
Cashel Mara Condominium Association Trust for Cinder McNerney. 
OCTOBER 21, 2009 

A public hearing was held regarding a Request for Determination of Applicability filed by Richard 
Salter for the rebuilding of a patio at 70 Glukes Point Rd, Swampscott. 

An Order of Conditions was issued to Ray Bastarache for the repair of a seawall at 22 Northstone 

Road. 

JANUARY 13, 2010 

A public hearing was held regarding a Request for Determination (RDA) filed by Vanasse Hangen 
Brustlin Inc. (VHB) to complete battery replacement installation activities at Tedesco 9 Substation. 
APRIL 14, 2010 

A public hearing was held regarding a proposal of a beach-monitoring program over the course of 
thirty years by Brad Hubeny. 

A public hearing was held regarding the necessity of the filing of a Notice of Intent (NOI) by Flori 
Shwartz for emergency work done to maintain a 4 by 4 ft. hole in her seawall. 



143 



Swampscott Contributory Retirement System 
July 1, 2009 to June 30, 2010 

Francis E. Delano, Jr., Elected, Chairman 
David Castellarin, Ex-Officio John F. Behen Jr. Elected 
John T. Kiely, Jr., Appointed Thomas H. Driscoll, Jr., Esq., Appointed 
Jeanne Darcy, Retirement Administrator 

Established in 1937, the Swampscott Contributory Retirement System is 
administered by a five-member Retirement Board and one full-time staff employee and 
one part-time employee. The Board is governed by Chapter 32 of the Massachusetts 
General Laws and by the Public Employee Retirement Administration Commission, a 
, state agency that provides guidance and oversight for 106 Massachusetts Retirement 
Boards. Membership in the plan is mandatory immediately upon commencement of 
employment for all permanent employees. The plan is a contributory defined benefit 
plan covering all Town employees deemed eligible by the Retirement Board, with the 
exception of schoolteachers, who contribute to the Massachusetts Teachers' Retirement 
Board. 

The System provides for retirement allowance benefits up to a maximum of 80% 
of a member's highest three-year average annual rate of regular compensation. Benefit 
payments are based upon a member's age, length of creditable service, salary and 
group classification. Members become vested after ten years of service. For certain 
hazardous duty and public safety positions, maximum retirement is at age 65. A 
retirement allowance consists of an annuity, which represents members' accumulated 
total deductions including interest and a pension portion, which is funded by the Town. 
The average retirement benefit is 80-85% pension 15-20% annuity. Active members 
contribute either 5,7,8 or 9% of their gross regular compensation to the Retirement 
System, determined by the date upon which the employee enters the service of the 
town. Any member hired after January 1, 1979 contributes an additional 2% on wages 
over $ 30,000.00. 

As mandated by law, the Retirement Board has a fiduciary responsibility to the 
members and retirees of the system and to propedy invest the fund's assets, totaling 
$31. 2M. In order to properly invest the system's assets, the Retirement Board engages 
the service of an investment consultant, Fiduciary Investment Advisors and ten 
investment managers: Chase Investment Counsel (large cap equities), and Wells Capital 
Management (fixed income securities), Eaton Vance Management (large cap equities), 
GE Investments (Commingled Pool), Artio International Equity (Comingled Funds, 
Atlantic Capital (SMid Cap Fund) and two real estate managers. Intercontinental Real 
Estate Corporation and American Realty Advisors., Piper Jaffray ( private equity 
manager). The Board also has an actuarial valuation performed every other year, the 
most recent being as of January 1, 2010. According to the January 1, 2010 valuation, 
the Retirement System is 46.6% funded vs. 51.6% as of January 1, 2008. The Unfunded 
Actuarial Accrued Liability is $36.4M. The System will be fully funded by the year 2034. 
During the period July 1, 2009-June 30, 2010, there were no changes in the makeup of 
the Board Members. For the year 2009, the Contributory Retirement System earned 
13.39% of a total return on investment. During the period July 1, 2009-June 30, 2010 a 
total of six Members retired. In addition, during this period, the Retirement System 
mourned the passing of five of our Retirees, or their surviving spouses. 

Respectfully submitted, Francis E. Delano, Jr., Chairman 



144 



Earth Removal Advisory Committee (ERAC) 
April 1,2011 

The ERAC issued only one permit this past year, and it is to Aggregate Industries located 
on Danvers Road; however, the quarry operation did not operate during the term of the 
permit due to economic condition affecting the entire US. The permit issued was 
identical to the prior year with only the exiting on the ground conditions updated. 

Change has come for the local quarry. After years and years, change is here; in part due 
to the economy and in part due to the firm and consistent demands from the ERAC and 
Board of Selectmen. 

Highlights in the current permit: the ERAC and Board of Selectmen eliminated summer 
work hours for the rock crusher after 5:30 to give local neighbors quiet evenings and 
weekends. After years of demands. Aggregate returned Essex Street to a quite residential 
roadway by banning all truck traffic from that very busy road. As of today (April 1, 
2010), the quarry is closed and not operating. All mobile equipment has been removed 
from the quarry and with the current economic climate, it is unknown if the operation will 
open this year. 

Please read the following narrative to gain a perspective of the history of this permit and 
plan that was put in place. 

At the end of the quarry modernization process which took years to complete, the ERAC 
and Town of Swampscott have been left with results that are unsatisfactory: The noise 
that was promised to go away with modernization is still there and problematic, and there 
is no quick fix. 

In no uncertain terms, and done in writing and reported in every annual report, the 
mandate was: bring the noise levels down, and modernize your equipment. Be sure to 
size your equipment to have the ability to meet your production requirements during a 
normal first shift operation, as the residents will not longer want to listen to rock crushers 
running at night. The Town of Swampscott has waiting since 1993 for this to happen. 
Unfortunately, it has not happened. 

While sound studies taken year after year have the quarry operation in and out of 
compliance with EPA standards, noise continues to be spread thru the neighborhoods 
both early in the morning, and late at night. 

At the permitting stage in June of 2008, the ERAC and Aggregate had agreed to reduce 
the summer night crushing hours to give the residents some relief during the summer. At 
the eleventh hour, within 20 minutes of the Public Hearing for the new permit, Aggregate 
Industries appeared with yet another new sound engineer, that told both the ERAC and 
Selectmen, that all the testing done over the years was done wrong, and that he had the 
right way to conduct the studies. 



145 



Citing potential job loss at the quarry, the selectmen and ERAC, although skeptical of 
this "new method," gave AI a reprieve to allow the new test to happen. At the same time, 
the expert for the ERAC wrote and contacted, the Massachusetts Department of 
Environmental Protection Agency (DEP) for guidance and to be sure the town was using 
the proper guidelines. More tests were conducted with this new engineer, and the results 
were unacceptable and did not change much from the test done in the spring; in fact, the 
testing may have been worse. Further, the DEP, issued written guidelines for noise 
studies that were in line with what the ERAC expert had been requiring over the past 
several years. 



When Aggregate Industries completely replaced and rebuilt the crushing plants, over a 
period of ten years, AI made a corporate decision not to increase the output of the facility 
to meet production needs, and AI made a corporate decision to leave many sound 
protection features off of the new manufacturing plant, despite the repeated requirement 
that was discussed verbally and put in writing every year and reported in the annual 
report (a copy of which is found here) AI cannot solve the problem now without 
reinvesting millions of dollars in the plant; which will also take years to complete. 
There are many methods in which Aggregate Industries can meet production needs 
without disturbing the residents in the night time; AI will need to plan for this as the 
summer of 2009 approaches. 



In 1993, former owner of the quarry Bardon Trimount, clear-cut a three-acre parcel of 
trees just north of Overhill road. Many neighbors felt increases in dust and noise. The 
Selectmen appointed a group and an Earth Removal by-law was voted in by town 
meeting in 1994. 

One of the first tasks of the newly formed "ERAC" was to place remaining undisturbed 
trees and property into a no-cut, no-disturb GREENBELT area for the protection of the 
neighbors. In addition, Bardon Trimount was forced to replant and replicate the three- 
acre site that was cut down without permits. 

The ERAC feels that the negative effect's of dust and noise the neighbors experienced 
and felt when the three acre parcel was clear-cut, is more than enough evidence to insist 
that the GREENBELT Buffer remain in place. The GREENBELT area is an important 
area to the residents and now the new Swampscott High School. The ERAC is working 
to ensure this area remain a solid buffer and is working at replanting some areas that have 
been encroached upon over the past few years. 



146 



The ERAC continues to insist upon quarry modernization at the Aggregate Industry 
Operation on Danvers Road. 

The ERAC monitors the testing of water at Fosters Dam, and has continued to work on 
new noise studies that are comparing the new crushing plants to the old outdated 
equipment that has been replaced. ERAC continues to build a date file in regards to the 
health and environmental issues surrounding the quarry operation. 

The ERAC monitors the daily operation of the quarry in regards to all activities in the 
quarry. The ERAC generally handles all complaints and inquiries at the Aggregate 
property. 



With the new high school up and running, Aggregate Industries put in place in mitigation 
efforts to reduce/eliminate Essex street truck traffic by having trucks hauling to Boston 
take a left out of the plant. This move has dramatically restored the quality of life to the 
residents along Essex street. 

The ERAC has been working and pushing AI to update and modernize the plant and 
equipment at the quarry since inception of the by-law in 1994. Using a strong, but fair 
guiding hand over the past few years, we can report that the quarry operation has been 
perhaps 99% modernized. The ERAC has negotiated fairly, but firmly. Many meetings 
have been confrontational with neither side wanting to back down. This seems to be a 
common occurrence in other local communities that have quarries located in them. 

Recognizing the size of the operation and understanding the complexity of replacing and 
modernizing a plant of such physical spanning size, the ERAC has worked with AI in 
directing, and sometimes selecting what was going to be done and in what order. For 
instance; the old secondary crusher was located right in the driveway of the old entrance. 
Crushing, screening, and loading of trucks were taking place just 200 feet from the 
entrance of the facility. Despite witnessing some valiant efforts by AI, both physically 
and financially to rein in the dust problem at this major section of plant, AI was unable 
bring dust containment down to an acceptable level. In order for the ERAC to 
recommend renewal of their permit AI had to relocate and upgrade this operation to an 
area of the quarry which was further back from the road, and into the upper part of the 
"hole." This plant has historically operated from the hours of 6:00 AM to 10:00 PM. 
The ERAC; in no uncertain terms has continuously informed AI that the plant and 
equipment should be sized properly to meet all their producfion needs within a 10-12 
hour work day. The ERAC has continuously clearly informed AI that after 2004, 
rock crushing past 5:00 or 6:00 PM in the evening was not realistic; and that the 
town and residents will not want to hear this equipment at that time of the evening 
and to be absolutely sure that their equipment and plant are sized to get the job 
done during typical construction hours. The ERAC continues to investigate some 



147 



outstanding engineering questions in regards to the secondary plant but is very 
encouraged by the plants operation. The noise level produce by this plant is the 
measurement in which the ERAC shall measure against the new Primar)' Plant in 2004. 

** The ERAC has stated that should AI be able to conduct operations that would be 
oblivious to the neighbors and residents of Swampscott and Salem, that we would not 
mind a 24 hour operation. "If we can't hear you, we will not know you're there." 



Another key decision by the ERAC was the relocation of the front entrance. In an effort 
to cut down on dust blowing off trucks and to try and achieve a 50/50 split with truck 
traffic traveling through Salem & Swampscott, the ERAC "suggested" that the entrance 
be relocated. The ERAC believed that by moving the entrance further down the road, a 
majority of dust would blow off the trucks before reaching the populated areas of 
Swampscott and Salem. Although the traffic goal of 50/50 has not been realized, and 
dust blowing off trucks has been substantially reduced, dust still blowing off trucks 
remains a problem. When the push was made to relocate the entrance, the truck wash 
station that was to be installed during the summer of 2001 was delayed in part to properly 
place the equipment within the area of the new entrance; an entrance that involved a 
substantial effort to build. A truck wash station is not a mobile piece of equipment. It 
made no sense to install this equipment at the old entrance when a new exit was being 
constructed. The ERAC has been working of some type of truck wash since 1998, but 
has prioritized our.improvement requests as we see fit. 

And finally the last piece of the puzzle: The primary crusher moves to the bottom 
by 2004. 

The ERAC has reached the end of a ten year effort to modernize the operation of the 
quarry. The primary crusher moving to the bottom of the hole is the final piece of the 
puzzle. But first some background on the current primary crusher: The primary crusher 
is the machine that most of the town is hearing. It is a machine that has two gigantic 
adjustable "jaws." It is also the first piece of equipment that the blasted rock is 
introduced to. Ledge rock is blasted from the face of the quarry, and hauled via huge 
trucks to the "hopper" of the primary plant. The trucks dump directly into the hopper and 
the rock falls into the "jaw" of the crusher. The jaw is set to a dimension to reduce the 
large raw blasted boulders into smaller rocks that are then screened and conveyed onto 
the secondary crushing plant. The primary plant is only one crusher . The secondary 
plant has many smaller crushers and screens that reduce and process the finished rock 
product. An interesting observation of the "jaw" crusher is that is makes less noise and 



148 



runs faster if the raw material being dumped in the hopper is not all large stones. 
Interesting because the blasting technique has a lot to do with the size of the raw material 
that is dumped into the hopper. A lesser and maybe weaker "blast" seems to produce 
much larger raw material. This larger raw material dumped into the hopper of the "jaw" 
make the "jaw" work that much harder, and is that much louder. Improved blasting 
techniques, as well as a new blasting contractor seem to have reduced the amount or 
larger rocks that go through the crusher as well as the blasting readings and complaints 
have diminished substantially over the past 6 years. 



The ERAC has worked to place the primary crusher in bottom of the hole for several 
reasons: 

1. Noise. The hope is that noise will be reduced to the level of the secondary 
crushing plant. This is the standard that we have talked about for the past several years. 
In 1997, before the secondary plant was replaced, the ERAC, in conjunction with former 
superintendent Marty McKenney, and Bardon Trimount noise engineer Mike Nutting, 
conducted several tests at various locations. We stood at the comer of Nichols and 
Martin road, the top of Overhill road, and at the intersection of Eastman and Minerva. 
With no measuring equipment set up, we conducted the following simple test: first we 
listened as the entire plant operated at full capacity. Marty then radioed the plant and had 
the secondary plant shut down. We noticed no change in the amount of noise. Next 
Marty radioed to run the secondary plant again, and this time shut down the primary 
plant, the "jaw." There was virtually no noise with the secondary plant running and 
the primary plant off. We performed this test at the other locations and heard the same 
results. This is to be the test for the new primary plant . In order to maintain the 
existing historical hours of operation, Bardon Trimount would have to reach the noise 
level of that when the secondary crusher is running by itsel f. No measure of decibel's; a 
simple test of the naked ear . It is Dan Dandreo's contention that the new plant will not 
be able to be achieved these noise levels even with the new primary crushing plant in 
place, which is why new capacity is so important. 

2. Capacity. The ERAC, concerned that noise reduction goals cannot be met, 
has continuously insisted that the new primary crusher is sized properly to ensure 
needed and contract production can be met within a 10-12 hour workday. ." This 
plant has historically operated from the hours of 7:00 AM to 9:00 PM. The ERAC; 
in no uncertain terms has continuously informed AI that the plant and equipment 
should be sized properly to meet all their production needs within a 10-12 hour 
work day. The ERAC has clearly informed AI that after 2004, rock crushing past 



149 



5:00 or 6:00 PM in the evening was not realistic; and that the town and residents 
will not want to hear this equipment at that time of the evening and to be absolutely 
sure that their equipment and plant are sized to get the job done during typical 
construction hours. 

3. Dust. The ERAC is optimistic that by placing the Primary Crusher deeper into 
the hole will reduce the dust from escaping the rim of the quarry because the dust will 
have to travel much further to leave the property. In addition, there appears to be several 
"foaming" products that are available that may be able to be adapted to the plant 
equipment to further reduce dust before it becomes airborne. 



Closing thought. Moving the primary crusher to the bottom of the hole by no means 
guarantees that all will be well at the end of 2004. By the end of 2004-2005, It appears 
that the quarry operation will be fully modernized. The Town of Swampscott, the City of 
Salem, and the quarry may be at a crossroad. Should the quarry, after ten years of intense 
modernization, not be able to reduce noise, dust and truck traffic to level's which allow it 
to co-exist with its neighbors, and not be able to reach and follow requirements out lined 
under the bylaws of the Town of Swampscott, the realization that a quarry of such 
magnitude just cannot fit in such a tight populated area may have to be made. Perhaps a 
new use of the land along the lines of the now closed Rowe quarry in Revere, or the Innis 
quarry in Danvers may indeed be the most appropriate use of the property. 



150 



EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 



Kevin Breen, Director 
Chief Ronald Madigan, Deputy Director 



The Town of Swampscott Emergency Management Agency provides the liaison to state and 
federal emergency management resources in times of disaster natural or man-made. The agency 
monitors initiatives from state and federal agencies and applies for appropriate grants for mitigation of 
local disasters as well as securing appropriate training for local officials to respond in times of need. 

This past year was a busy one operationally for Emergency Management. May 1^' Swampscott 
along with the two million users of MWRA were struck by a catastrophic water break in Weston which cut 
off all drinking water. We were able to use the Town's new reverse 91 1 phone calling system for the first 
time to alert all 5,000 households simultaneously of the mandatory boil order for all water. The Town had 
only recently completed training on the new system from Connect CTY, which allows officials from Police, 
Fire, DPW or others to place thousands of notification phone calls, E-Mails or text messages to all 
residents or only those in a selected area of Town in time of emergency. Working with Region 1 of the 
Mass. Emergency Management Agency, we immediately ordered 3,000 gallons of water to be delivered 
to the High School for use on Monday for the Schools. Special thanks to the High School custodians and 
DPW for assisting in off loading the National Guard trucks by hand!! We continued to check supplies of 
bottled water at the local grocery stores where supplies remained adequate throughout the crisis. The 
Police utilized the "are you ok" system to contact elderly residents and shut-ins who are registered with 
the system to see that they had adequate water supplies. Early on May 5'^ the boil order was lifted and 
the crisis ended. All in all this was a good exercise and taught us many lessons for the future. 

In September we made preparations for nearly a week as category 4 Hurricane Earl bore down 
on the Northeast. Shelter and evacuation plans were put in place by the Emergency Management team. 
Fortunately none of these were necessary as Earl rapidly weakened to a Tropical Storm by the time it 
reached New England on September 4'^ 

From March 13*^ to 15*^ we were not quite as lucky as heavy rains inundated the region. As 
much as 13 to 15 inches of rain fell during this period. Widespread flooding of basements and low lying 
areas caused significant damage. A national disaster was declared for the whole area including 
Swampscott, and Emergency Management worked with State and Federal agencies to apply for relief for 
both residents and Town Infrastructure. 

Plans for this year are to outfit an area in Town to be used as an Emergency Operations Center. 
Eventually such a center would likely be housed in the new Police station, until then however we are 
working to identify a suitable area. Also we would like to get emergency power to Town Hall as this is the 
primary hub for our computer networks. Also through a Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC) grant 
we are conducting a full up-date of our Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan (CEMP). 

I would like to remind all residents that Emergency Preparedness is everyone job. Residents 
should always be prepared with non perishable food, water, flashlights, battery operated radios, warm 
clothing and blankets. While we don't live in an area of the country prone to the types of disasters we see 
on the news every day, i.e. tornadoes, earthquakes, etc. we remain prone to blizzards, hurricanes and 
believe it or not earthquakes, so individual vigilance remains our collective best defense. 

I would like to thank my co-partners in this preparedness effort, Town Administrator Andrew 
Maylor, Police Chief Ronald Madigan, and DPW Director Gino Cresta for their ongoing support 



151 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

The mission of the Swampscott Fire Department is to provide optimum protection from fire loss, and to 
provide prompt and professional response to all medical emergencies. Although our primary objective is 
always to prevent loss of life and property through a proactive approach to fire prevention, when fire does 
occur, to contain and extinguish it with minimum loss. 

The Fire Department is made up of three divisions. The first division is the Administrative 
division, which is the Fire Chief, Training and Operations Officer (TOPS), and the Fire Investigation Unit 
(FIU). The Tops Officer is in charge of training, operations, and planning. He also keeps records of all the 
training that is done by the fire persoimel, as well as records of all the equipment that is used by the 
department. This position is vital, because it keeps continuity between the four shifts that are working and 
coordinates with numerous professionals needed to keep the training current and up to date. The FIU unit is 
made up of one Lieutenant and one fire fighter, who are normally assigned to the suppression duty but have 
been trained in fire investigation and do so in addition to their other duties. They work in concert with 
members of the Swampscott Police Department Investigative division as well as Massachusetts State Police 
Investigators assigned to the Office of the State Fire Marshall. 

The second division is the Fire Prevention division, this division has the responsibility to issue and 
track all permits required by the Conmionwealth to conduct business which involve combustible or 
hazardous materials. These permits range from smoke detector permits for sale of property all the way to 
blasting permits for the use of explosives. This year the Division has been working on the states new 
crowd manager law, as well as preparing to implement the 8* edition of the building code. One of the most 
important fiinctions of Fire Prevention is the review of all construction plans for fire safety systems. Even 
in the midst of this recession two new restaurants, both with complex fire safety systems, and several other 
businesses have come on line making 2010 very busy. Both of these divisions are supervised by the 
Deputy Chief 

The third division is the fire Suppression/EMS division and this is made up subdivisions. There 
are four sub-divisions, each consisting of eight personnel with this configuration we are currently running 
with one Engine Company and one Ladder Company per shift. Each group works a 24-hour shift giving, 
the residents of Swampscott 24/7 Emergency Medical and Fire Protection. 

During the fiscal year July 1, 2009 to June 30, 2010 the fire department answered one thousand 
eight hundred and twelve emergency calls, of which forty six involved fires in buildings. The department 
also responded to eight hundred fifty one medical aids, one hundred thirteen motor vehicle accidents, thirt>' 
eight of which involved injuries, nine involved pedestrians. The Department also responded to over twelve 
hundred Non-Emergency Incident calls during the year. These calls dealt with fire inspections, school fire 
drills, box plug outs and any other non-emergency calls that the Fire Department might be required to 
respond to during the year. 

PERSONNEL 

On June 25"' Christopher DiPietro was appointed to the Department to replace Firefighter Jermifer 
Bleiker who resigned due to relocation. In July Acting Chief Michael Champion has announced that he 
will retire. Currently the Town Administration is exploring various selection processes to select the new 
Chief Under consideration is a new process called an assessment center which employs realistic job 
modeling instead of the traditional written exam. The goal is to appoint a new Chief by the middle of next 
year. 

TRAINING, OPERATIONS, PLANNING AND SAFETY (TOPS) 

The Swampscott Fire Department has continued to provide its members with daily training. Each 
day company officers conduct training exercises on such basic topics as ladder operations and air pack 
usage, to training on building construction, tactics and pre-fire planning for various properties in Town. 
This year with the arrival of the new engine the department was one of the first on the North Shore to train 
on a brand new state of the art pump simulator, designed in Texas and operated by representatives from C 
& S Specialties of RI. Each member of the department received hands on training under realistic 
conditions. We hope to bring this exciting technology back later next year for more advanced training. 
There has been a number of co-training courses that have been taught with the surrounding Fire 
Departments. 

Joint training with our surrounding communities has also been an important part of our overall 
training program. Last Spring Swampscott, Marblehead and Nahant participated in a day long exercise in 
Marblehead harbor learning how to deploy oil spill containment equipment from the State's oil spill trailer 



152 



one of which is housed in Marblehead and Swampscott. Early next year we plan to conduct several joint 
training programs with communities such as Marblehead. In April we expect to train on the State Fire 
Academy's flashover simulator, as well as elevator rescue training, and more propane fire training. 

Over the year many of our members take advantage of courses taught in Stow MA at the state Fire 
Academy. These programs have ranged from courses in weapons of mass destruction, to live fire training 
in the bum building. The academy represents a tremendous resource for high quality at little or no cost. 

Each year the Fire Department trains in EMS. Ninety seven percent of the Department will be 
recertified by the state as EMT's. This is a two-year process that requires each EMT to complete courses 
and accumulate 28 CEUs (Continuing Education Units) credits plus a 24-hour refresher course and 
examination to comply with State regulations. This will include CPR and defib training as well. We work 
closely with our Ambulance provider Action Ambulance who provides much of this training at no cost. 

From a planning, operation, and safety standpoint, the Department continues to make safety for 
our firefighters and citizens our number one priority. Standard Operating Procedures are our guidelines for 
safety when using tools or operating at emergency incidents. These procedures are being reviewed for ways 
to improve on safety and efficiency throughout the year. These guidelines are also used to help maintain 
the consistency with the shifts in the daily operations of the Department. 

The Department S.A.F.E. Program (Student Awareness of Fire Education) is still run by Lt. 
Zimbaldi and Lt. Scranton. These program coordinators and instructors can be found in our Middle School, 
educating the young students in valuable information on fire safety. This program is State-run, and is 
totally funded from grant money that the instructors have applied for each year. Lt. Zimbaldi and Lt. 
Scranton have had great success with the elementary school age children. 

FIRE PREVENTION 

The Fire Department's Fire Prevention Office, under the direction of Acting Deputy Kevin Breen 
inspects all commercial establishments and residences of three or more families annually. In addition to 
this, all mandatory inspections and fire drills are conducted in accordance with Massachusetts State Law. 
Deputy Potts also works closely with the building department to review all plans for construction or 
substantial renovation to ensure proper fire protection systems are in place at the design stage 

There are over thirty different types of permits, ranging from cooking fires on the beach to under 
ground storage tanks. Over 70% of these permits need follow-up inspections to be sure that the applicant 
has complied completely with the laws. Last year 424 permits of various types were issued and 
$15,995 was collected. These inspections as well as the mandatory building and school inspections, are 
done as non-emergency incidents, by the on shift crews. And they number in the thousands each year. 

APPARATUS AND EQUIPMENT 

The Town has three pieces of fire apparatus in their fleet; there are two fire engines and one tower 
ladder. The tower ladder was bought in 2004 and is in good shape. This year the department successftilly 
completed the purchase of a 2009 Crimson engine from Hilton Head Island South Carolina. This unique 
opportunity saved the Town nearly $200,000 over the cost of a custom ordered Engine. This piece replaces 
our 1988 E-One Hush and becomes our first line piece. The other engine is a 1997 E-One Cyclone. 
Placing this piece in reserve service will take some of the strain off of it; however the average life span of 
fire apparatus is twenty years. As this piece ages we may face major refurbishment and ultimately 
replacement. 

BUILDINGS 

This year saw the sale of the former Phillips Beach Station to a private owner who is converting it 
into a unique single family home. The outside of the Burrill Street Station had been upgraded and should 
hold up well in the coming years. Thanks to a Town wide energy grant, improvements have been made to 
the lighting and heating systems, and insulation is slated to be installed in the attic. The interior is in need 
of having all of the vinyl asbestos tile removed and replaced and some interior painting. Some of this work 
hopefiilly can be carried out through capitol improvement monies by DPW. The Atlantic hand tub building 
adjacent to the Burrill St. Station is in need of a new roof and some exterior painting. We would also like 
to raise the height of the garage door so that the Atlantic can be moved in and out on its trailer. A new 
45,000 watt diesel generator with transfer switch has been installed at the station replacing the 1956 
original. With the help of some favorable bidding we were able to provide the police station with a 20,000 
watt automatic generator under the same article. This provided the 911 center with sorely needed 
automatic back up power. 



153 



MONUMENT DEDICATION 

I would like to offer special thanks to Captain Kevin Thompson. Captain Thompson supervised 
the design construction and installation of a monument to six officers and firefighters who died in the line 
of duty over the years in Swampscott. The monument is located in front of the Atlantic building next to the 
Fire Station. In addition he organized the dedication which took place last June 19'*' on a beautiful clear 
day in front of several hundred townspeople, and family members of the fallen Firefighters. If you have 
not already, I urge you to visit this moving tribute to six brave individuals who gave their last full measure 
for the Town of Swampscott 

CONCLUSION 

Despite the current fiscal climate The Fire Department has been able to remain stable this year and 
into next year by experiencing no staff reductions. Early next year we will hire a new Firefighter which 
will equally staff each of the four groups at eight personnel per shift. This should help us reduce some 
overtime costs. Optimally we would like to operate two Engines and one Ladder fiill time we now rely on 
other communities to provide our second engine. I would be remiss if I did not plead my case to allow us to 
add more staff to the Department as funds may become available in the fiiture. 

The Fire Department wishes to thank the citizens of Swampscott for your support over the last 
year, and vows to continue its dedication in providing the best possible service in the year to come. 

Respectfiilly Submitted, 
Kevin F. Breen, Fire Chief 



154 



Harbor Advisory Committee 



William F. Hennessey-Chairman 



Dana Swanstrom-Vice Chair/Clerk 



Robert Begin 
Milton Fistel 
Paul Garcelon 



Lawrence P. Bithell 
Michael Gambale 
Peter McCarriston 



Jacl<son Schultz 



The year 2010 has been an extremely active year for the Harbor Advisory Committee; one 
fueled by many waterfront issues. Additionally, with the infusion of fresh ideas from new members 
bolstered by a keen interest in our waterfront by the Selectman liaison to the committee, Richard 
Malagrifa, we have managed to stay extremely busy. 

This committee, comprised of individuals having special interest and expertise in matters 
relating to the waterfront, met on a monthly basis from June through December to consider many 
issues. Those issues varied from short term concerns requiring prompt attention to intermediate 
concerns of a less urgent nature, and finally, to plans for harbor enhancement on a long term 
basis. Of immediate concern for example was the hap-hazard storage of boats, kayaks, and 
canoes on the sand at Fishermen's Beach. Over the years, no doubt exacerbated by the fact that 
pram racks in the area had been destroyed by severe ocean storms, these vessels had been 
scattered about the beach in a totally disorganized fashion. In addition to presenting an unsightly 
appearance in and around the area, the boats, kayaks, etc. took up valuable beach space that 
more appropriately might be used by bathers. In an effort to remedy this situation, the Harbor 
Advisory Committee codified a set of sensible regulations, to include the restoration or 
replacement of pram racks designed to help organize boat storage in the area. This, combined 
with a permitting process, as well as limitations on the size of vessels stored on the shore, should 
provide a sense of order in the area. This specific action, with an outcome to ultimately be 
determined next boating/bathing season, is calculated to provide peaceful coexistence among all 
who use Fishermen's Beach and to generally provide for a better pattern of use in what truly is a 
focal point of our community. 

Other goals relate to the Fish House, pier, and the "harbor" itself. The word harbor appears 
in quotation marks here because what has come to be known as Swampscott Harbor is not really 
a harbor at all. It is in fact a section of Nahant Bay and lacks the customary protection from 
severe weather normally associated with true harbors. Inasmuch as the beach adjacent to our 
harbor is south facing, our fleet at mooring is somewhat protected from the most common storms, 
specifically Nor'easters, as those storms emanate from the land. For storms approaching from the 
east and southeast particularly, those come directly from the ocean and often pose a severe 
threat to boats at mooring here. A long-term goal might then be to place a breakwater out into 
the bay to provide additional protection for our fleet. A safer and true harbor might accommodate 
additional boats then also serve as a destination port for boaters from other communities. 
Additional boats at mooring might generate significantly greater income to the town in the form of 
mooring fees and boat excise taxes. If the Humphrey Street corridor is improved as many see as 
a way to increase business activity in the area, folks might just wish to visit by boat to patronize 
our merchants. In any event, this would come under the category of a long-term plan that will 
require considerable study, analysis, and decision making prior to implementation. 

As a community, Swampscott is comprised of large numbers of diverse special interest 
groups. Many citizens may observe that their own special interests involve neither boating nor 
bathing and wonder why they should support waterfront improvement initiatives. We hope and 
trust that most residents recognize that the Town's proximity to the sea adds considerable value 
to their property and lifestyle whether of not they utilize the harbor or town beaches. It is after-all, 
Swampscott's waterfront that distinguishes us from other communities. Without our ocean 
proximity, we would all be residing in a town too small what with our 3.1 square mile area 
having too many people for the available space. It is the oceanfront that provides us, perhaps by 
illusion, with the impression that we have more space than we do; space that provides vistas far 



155 



beyond our actual land mass. The sea cools us in the summer and It warms us In the winter. So, 
whether one takes conscious advantage our ocean proximity or one does not, we all benefit and 
thus have a stake in improving the waterfront. It truly is one of our greatest assets and, along with 
our National Historic Landmark, the Municipal Fish House, should be to Swampscott what Bear 
Skin Neck and Motif #1 are to Rockport. 

By the same token, boaters and bathers must enthusiastically support the initiatives of 
other special interest groups throughout the town. For example, even though one may not have 
children in the school system, who among us would deny that it is in everyone's best interest that 
the children of the community be well educated in a superior public school system? The Harbor 
Advisory Committee feels therefore that townspeople should support one another in terms of 
special interests thus providing both diversity and an overall well-being throughout the town. 

In conclusion, all Harbor Advisory Committee members feel privileged to offer our service 
to the Town, the Selectmen, the Department of Public Works, and to the Town Administrator with 
respect to matters related to our special interest, the Swampscott waterfront. Our hope is that the 
advice furnished will be deemed of value, ultimately benefiting the Town and all its citizens. 



Respectfully submitted, 

William F. Hennessey 
Chairman 



156 



Harbormaster's Department 



Lawrence P. Bithell-Harbormaster 

Assistant Harbormasters 

Mounzer Aylouche 

Roger Bruley 
Geoffrey Boland 

The 2010 boating season in Swampscott may best be described as most pleasant. Weekends 
typically featured very nice weather so activity around the harbor was thus quite brisk. Extremely 
high fuel prices did pose a detriment to boat usage so folks often just sat on their boats at 
mooring rather than opting for a cruise. Those with sailboats did enjoy a distinct advantage 
versus folks having powerboats. 

The number of vessels moored in Swampscott waters did diminish somewhat as compared to 
the previous year. The Lincoln House Point section of the anchorage continues to shoal from 
natural causes. This shoaling was further exacerbated due to the Town's moving sand from 
Fisherman's Beach to Cassidy Park at Martin Way without benefit of a permit from the 
Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection. Furthermore, there has been a veritable 
explosion of eel grass growth within that section of the harbor. Approximately ten mooring spaces 
were thus lost in the Lincoln House Point section The Harbormaster and staff did work very hard 
throughout the summer clearing abandoned moorings and thus, we were able to gain enough 
space to accommodate all seeking moorings in Swampscott. There no longer is the waiting list 
that existed during the past few years. 

There were no particularly destructive weather events this season; thus, no vessels sustained 
damage of any significance. 

As the principal public safety official upon Swampscott waters, your Harbormaster is 
responsible for enforcing federal, state, and local ordinances as they affect the waterfront. This 
encompasses many facets including: 

1 . With the assistance of the Town Clerk and the Town Treasurer, 
manages the mooring permit system. 

2. Establishes mooring equipment specifications tailored to specific 
vessels while at mooring. 

3. Inspects mooring equipment to assure compliance with specifications. 

4. Places mooring equipment in the harbor to assure proper spacing between 
boats while ascertaining that vessels are located where sufficient depth 
exists to accommodate draft and swing requirements. 

5. Patrols town waters with an eye toward boater and bather safety. 

6. Performs rescues at sea from time to time as necessary. 

7. Maintains town boat to assure suitability for its mission as an 
"emergency" vessel. 

8. With the staff of Assistant Harbormasters, participates in ongoing 

training under the auspices of the Massachusetts Criminal Justice Training 
Council in conjunction with the Massachusetts Harbormasters Association. 



157 



The purpose of the foregoing elements of your Harbormaster's function is to make certain that 
boating upon Swampscott waters remains a safe and wholesome recreational pursuit for all. 

2010 was the fourth full season for the town boat. It performed as expected and should 
continue to do so for its estimated useful life of twenty-five years. Equipment on the boat including 
radar, a global positioning system, a de-watering system, and a depth sounder provides the staff 
with that which is necessary to perform our mission. This boat will suit the current staff and the 
next generation harbormaster and assistant harbormasters. Considerable time and energy went 
into training on the boat to include familiarization with its state-of-the-art equipment. 

Your Harbormaster and Assistant Harbormasters continue to be active in the Massachusetts 
Harbormasters Association. The North Shore Branch of this organization is comprised of 
Harbormasters Departments from Winthrop to Salisbury and all coastal communities in between. 
Because of our involvement in this association, a Swampscott student is eligible to compete for a 
$1,000.00 college scholarship sponsored by the North Shore Branch. Mutual aid is also available 
when necessary. In 2009, the scholarship was awarded to a Swampscott student. 

The time has come for the Harbormaster's Department to seek additional trained staff. 
Accordingly, we have recruited two highly qualified individuals for Assistant Harbormaster 
positions. The names of these individuals were submitted to the Town Administrator and to the 
Selectmen for approval and appointment. This strengthening of staff will provide for greater 
coverage and efficiency. Since these individuals volunteer their time, there will be no additional 
cost to the town for their services. Unfortunately, the Town Administrator did not see fit to appoint 
two new Assistant Harbormasters. Rather, only one was appointed leaving a significant coverage 
gap in the department forcing our volunteer assistants to put in more and more time. The current 
staff is simply overworked. 

In order to assure success in accomplishing the mission of the Harbormaster's Department, 
cooperation of many individuals, organizations, boards, and committees is essential. We extend 
appreciation to all who assisted us and who supported our initiatives. Very special appreciation is 
extended to the Assistant Harbormasters who devote so much time and effort on a purely 
voluntary basis. Additionally, to the boaters whom we serve, thank you for your cooperation and 
good will, for it is you who ultimately make boating in Swampscott such a wholesome and 
pleasurable pastime. 

Finally, I wish to extend my deep appreciating to retired Assistant Harbormaster Bill 
Hennessey. Bill served the boating community as Assistant Harbormaster in a distinguished 
fashion for more than twenty-eight years. He will be missed. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Lawrence P. Bithell-Harbormaster 



158 



ANNUAL REPORT BOARD OF HEALTH JULY 1, 2009 THROUGH JUNE 30, 2010 



Dr. Larry Block, Chairman of the Board of Health 
Nelson Kessler, Member, Board of Health 
Martha Dansdill, Member, Board of Health 

Jeffrey Vaughan, Director of Public Health 

Roseanne Morrissey Bruno, RN, EMT, Public Health Nurse 

The Board of Health continues to be committed to promoting health and well being for the 
residents of Swampscott. The Board of Health values the importance of educating residents in many 
areas of public health and safety. As well, the Health Department works with many other departments 
and communities to ensure a sound environment. 

TRASH & RECYCLING 

Trash and recycling continue to be a big part of the Board of Health's day-to-day operation. The 
Health Department deals with multiple phone calls, questions, requests and complaints many of which 
need to be investigated before they can be resolved. Our recycling contracts, as well as the rubbish 
contract, is with Hiltz Disposal. DeRosa Landfill Management is utilized for the paper recycling needs of 
the Schools and Municipal buildings. 

The Board of Health began the project of trying to find ways of reducing the amount of trash the 
town and residents throw out while increasing the amounts we recycle. The Board also is looking to 
revamp and reenergize the Recycling Committee. The Board urges all Swampscott residents to recycle 
more diligently as it is beneficial to the town, both ecologically and economically. 

Residents can drop-off white goods (i.e.: washing machines, dryers, hot water heaters) and other 
metal objects at the Department of Public Works yard on Paradise Road. This program is available the 
last Saturday of each month during the months of March to November. The collections from April - 
October are special events where the Machon School Playground Committee runs the collection and 
receives a percentage of the recycled metal proceeds to aid their fundraising efforts in building a new 
playground. 

In the past year, the Board of Health sponsored two (2) Electronics drop-offs. We collected 
approximately two hundred sixty (260) televisions and computer monitors, as well as twenty-six (26) 
microwave ovens and various other electronic devices. 

We offered two (2) household hazardous waste day events. These events, in June and 
November, were held in conjunction with the Marblehead Board of Health for both communities. 

There were six (6) curbside leaf pickups as well as, two Christmas tree collections. Also, the 
residents wishing to dispose of yard waste could purchase a sticker through the Department of Public 
Works for fifty dollars ($50.00) and bring their leaves and grass clipping up to the Landscape Gardeners 
facility on Swampscott Road. 

RESTAURANT INSPECTIONS 

Yearly inspections include approximately seventy (70) establishments in the Town of 
Swampscott. If a restaurant fails, Jeffrey Vaughan makes follow-up visits until that establishment is in 
compliance with the State Health and Sanitary codes. Yearly, the Health Department sends out permits 
to these establishments. 

BEACH TESTING 

Beach testing is performed weekly. We have six (6) beaches that are required to be tested 
throughout the summer. We had five (5) incidents during this time frame where the bacteria in the water 
was elevated and forced the Health Department to post warning signs on a beach. Signs were posted 
at the main entrance of the effected beach stating "No Swimming" until follow-up tests revealed 
acceptable results. The Board of Health recommends no swimming at town beaches within twenty-four 
hours of heavy rainstorms. Phillips Beach and Preston Beach were remarkably clean in 2009. 



159 



EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS 

The Swampscott Health Department is a participant in the North Shore - Cape Ann Emergency 
Preparedness Coalition, a fifteen (15) community coalition that meets monthly to plan resources and 
responses to public health threats and emergencies. Such emergencies would include terrorism and 
outbreaks of infectious diseases. 

In 2009, the Health Department held over eight (8) small clinics specifically for the administration 
of H1N1 vaccine. Tools and volunteers from our Preparedness Coalition were heavily utilized during 
these clinics. 

The coalition has developed a website to enhance the communities' collective capacity to share 
these resources and to create a database of medical and non-medical volunteers. 

The Board of Health encourages all residents to visit http://www.nscalert.orq to help better 
prepare themselves for emergency situations and to volunteer in emergencies. 

CLINICS 
INFLUENZA 

Due to the H1N1 outbreak, the Board of Health conducted six (6) public flu clinics this past year. 
These clinics were held at Congregation Shirat Hayem of the North Shore (2) and the Swampscott High 
School (2) and Town Hall (2). Roseanne Morrissey Bruno along with volunteer nurses and student nurses 
from Salem State College were able to immunize approximately fifteen hundred (1500) residents. The flu 
clinics were very successful due to the many volunteers that came forward to participate. We would like 
to thank Rabbi Levy for the use of the Congregation Shirat Hayem facilities. The Public Health Nurse 
billed all senior health plans for the administration costs and collected a total of one hundred thirty-three 
dollars and twenty-three cents ($133.23) 

The Health Department thanked the volunteers of the flu clinics with a breakfast. We appreciate 
their support and commitment. 

The Health Department also supplied home visits for eldedy inbound residents. 

BLOOD PRESSURE 

Roseanne Morrissey Bruno, RN, EMT performed nine (9) scheduled blood pressure clinics at the 
Senior Center. The Health Department would like to thank volunteer, Mary Curtis, RN, for conducting 
afternoon blood pressure clinics on a continuous basis. 

HEPATITIS A 

The Board of Health continues to offer the Hepatitis A program to Swampscott food handlers. 
HEPATITIS B 

Hepatitis B vaccines continue for eligible town employees. Each new town worker for the 
Department of Public Works, Police Department, Fire Department and School Department may choose to 
be immunized against Hepatitis B. This is recommended especially for first responders who would be 
more at risk. Several employees were immunized in the past twelve months. 

PNEUMOCOCCAL 

The Swampscott Health Department offers Pneumococcal vaccine to all eligible residents in the 
town. Several vaccinations were given out this year. 

IMMUNIZATIONS DISPENSEMENT 

All State supplied vaccines are now delivered directly to the Physician's Offices. The public 
health nurse is available for any questions or concerns that may arise. 

COMMUNICABLE DISEASE 

Our Public Health Nurse tracked all communicable diseases in the town, watching closely for any 
clusters or outbreaks. The Public Health Nurse works closely with the Massachusetts Department of 
Public Health (MDPH). school nurses, and doctor's offices. 



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GRANT 



NORTHSHORE & CAPE ANN EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS COALITION 

The Northshore & Cape Ann Emergency Preparedness Coalition received a grant from the 
Center for Disease Control to respond to public health threats and emergencies such as bio-terrorism and 
outbreaks of infectious disease. 

The monies received by the North Shore and Cape Ann Emergency Preparedness Coalition must 
be earmarked for Health Department needs only. The money cannot be turned over to the general funds. 
The City of Gloucester is the host community and disperses funding to each community in accordance 
with population and need. 

NORTH SHORE TOBACCO CONTROL 

In accordance with the North Shore Area Boards of Health Collaborative grant requirements two 
(2) full compliance checks were conducted in FY09. The outcomes of these checks were as follows; 

Date No. of Establishments Checked Compliance Achieved 

11/1 7/09 4 Checked with no violations 1 00% rate 

04/22/1 6 Checked with no violations 1 00% rate 

In addition to the compliance checks, the North Shore Tobacco Control Program conducted two 
(2) assessment/educational visits at each permitted establishment too survey and evaluate the emerging 
number of Other Tobacco Products (OTP) and crossover paraphernalia items being sold at local 
establishments. Presentations were conducted before the Board of Health to convey the local findings. 



CAMP INSPECTIONS 

In June of each year, the Director and Public Health Nurse inspects three (3) summer camps for the 
purpose of meeting the regulations developed by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health and 
local rules. This is another state required mandate that must be done for the safety of our children. This 
inspection included a thorough investigation of the campsite to insure that the environment was safe for 
the attending children. 

• Safe structures and equipment 

• Sanitary facilities 

• Adequate supervision of the campers at all times 

• Plans and protocols in place for medical emergencies, including medicine administration, 
natural and physical disasters 

• Sufficient health care coverage 

• Injury and fire prevention protocols 

• CORI and SORI checks for all employees 

• To ensure that there is a health supervisor on site over the age of eighteen (18) who knows first 
aid and CPR 

• Up to date immunization records for staff and campers 
INFORMATIONAL ARTICLES 

The Health Director and Public Health Nurse published several articles in the Swampscott Reporter, 
thanks to George Derringer for his assistance. 

CONFERENCES ATTENDED 

The Health Department attended conferences or were educated in the following: 

• Emergency Preparedness, geo-thermal wells, food source terrorism, etc. 

• Monthly Public Health Nurse's Meeting in Tewksbury State Hospital 

OTHER POINTS OF INTEREST 

The Health Department continues to collect button batteries, recyclable batteries, cellular phones and 
small fluorescent bulbs at our Town Hall office. 



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VITAL STATISTICS 

The Town of Swampscott welcomed one hundred twenty-two (122) new residents with more 
males than females. There were sixty-six (66) males and fifty-six (56) females born. Congratulations to 
all! 

This year there were one hundred fifty-seven (157) deaths in Swampscott. The leading cause of 
death was cardiac conditions followed by various respiratory failure and cancer conditions. 

In closing, we would like to thank all the dedicated staff and volunteers for making July 2009 through June 
201 a very dynamic and triumphant time for the Board of Health. 



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SWAMPSCOTT HISTORICAL COMMISSION 
ANNUAL REPORT 



The Historical Commission held a dedication in September, 2009 for 
the portraits of Elihu Thomson and his wife, Mary Louise Peck. They are 
located on the second floor of Town Hall near the Health Office, which 
was the location of their bedroom. 

Phase one of the restoration of the Andrews Chapel has been 
completed. Most of the work done was to the exterior of the building. 
The next phase will concentrate on the interior. On the advice from the 
Massachusetts Historical Commission, the Town hired Shari Berg to 
complete an inventory of the Swampscott Cemetery for listing on the 
National Historic Register. Once the inventory is completed, it will be 
submitted for acceptance. This listing will enable the Town to apply for 
grant money to help with the work still too done on the Chapel. 

At our April meeting, the Swampscott Yacht Club came back before 
the Historical Commission with a design proposal for an addition to the 
"bump-out" located on the second floor of the Fish House. After much 
discussion and input from concerned neighbors, fishermen and yacht 
club members, the Commission approved the request. The Yacht Club 
must return to meet with the Commission before work begins so that we 
can approve the materials used. This will insure that the original 
historical integrity of the building is maintained. 

William Travascio, an Eagle Scout, joined us at our June, 2010 
meeting with a proposal to beautify the World War II Monument. His 
plan included cleaning the graffiti and clutter from the back of the 
monument, trimming bushes and trees, planting a new flower bed and 
installation of a flagpole. The Commission gave him our unanimous 
approval. 

As always, the Commission would like to thank the members of the 
Board of Selectmen and Andrew Maylor for their continued support of 
our many endeavors. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Jean F. Reardon 
Chairperson 



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7/1/09-6/30/10 



SWAMPSCOTT HOUSING AUTHORITY 

James L. Hughes, Chairman 

Albert DiLisio Marianne McGrath 

Barbara Eldridge Richard Callahan 

The Swampscott Housing Authority has as its prime mission providing safe, affordable housing to 
low income families, elders and handicapped individuals in the Town of Swampscott. The Swampscott 
Housing Authority owns, maintains and operates 36 two and three bedroom family housing units at the 
Margaret Kelly Family Housing Community located at Cherry Street and Cherry Court Swampscott; the 
Authority also owns and operates at two locations, Duncan Terrace and Doherty Circle 84 one-bedroom 
housing units for low income Elderly and Handicapped citizens.. Additionally, the Swampscott Housing 
Authority owns a multi-tenant, group home located at 12 Ryan Place, Swampscott. The Ryan Place group 
home is operated for the benefit of mentally challenged, physically handicapped residents by the 
Northeast Association of Retarded Citizens (Northeast ARC). The Authority has leased 12 Ryan Place to 
Northeast ARC for approximately 20 years. Because of the lack of State funding during Fiscal Year 2009- 
2010, the prime focus of the Authority has been on quality of tenant life issues. Executive Director, Donna 
McDonald has continued to address issues of quality of life in our public housing communities. 

However, in spite of the continuing financial constraints placed on the Housing Authorities 
throughout the state by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the Massachusetts Department of 
Housing and Community Development (DHCD), the Swampscott Housing Authority was able to 
participate in a modernization project funded by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts which allowed the 
Swampscott Housing Authority replace the toilets at the Doherty Circle Elderly/Handicapped Community 
with new, eco-friendly lo-flow toilets. This project allowed the Authority to install 44 new toilets, at no cost 
to the Authority, which in addition to the low water capability are also new "comfort" height toilets. 
Reportedly, these new toilets provide more comfort to the elderly tenants and will provide a substantial 
saving of water usage for both the Authority and the Town. 

In 2009-2010, the Swampscott Housing Authority did not accept applications for either two and 
three bedroom housing units at the family housing community due to the length of the waiting lists. All 
vacancies were filled from the current waiting list. The family waiting lists were updated in the Spring of 
2010. 

All employees of the Swampscott Housing Authority and all members of the Board of Governors 
are required by State law to comply with the training and testing requirements of revised State Ethics Law 
of 2010. All mandated employees and Board members completed the on-line computer training and 
testing in a timely manner and are certified as in legal compliance with the State Ethics Law.. 

The Board commenced action to expand tenant parking at Doherty Circle by adding four badly 
needed parking spaces on the exit roadway from the Circle to Burrill Street. The process of notifying 
neighbors of the proposed action and allowing for public comment was not completed by the end of this 
reporting period. 

The Housing Authority has continued its relationship with Sam Stone of CyberSense Training & 
Consulting. Mr. Stone, a life-long Swampscott resident has developed software specifically for the smaller 
housing authorities. The regular use of the specialized software developed by Mr. Stone has led more 
efficient administration of all the Authority's more than one hundred public housing units. The Swampscott 
Housing Authority continues to cooperate with the sponsoring churches and synagogues of Swampscott 
and with the Swampscott Senior Center in the distribution of donated food at Duncan Terrace and 
Doherty Circle. Once a month, the Inter-Faith Food Pantry, coordinated by Ms. Patricia Krippendorf of 
Grant Road provides free food for elderly and handicapped residents of Duncan Terrace and Doherty 
Circle and some family tenants. Many of the residents count on these bags of groceries, so generously 
provided by the Food Pantry, to tide them over to the beginning of the month. The tenants and the 
Authority are very grateful to the Inter-Faith Food Pantry, the Swampscott Senior Center personnel and 
the volunteers of each of the organization for their generous contribution of time and money to our needy 
and infirmed. 



164 



Two long time members of the Swampscott Housing Authority Board of Governors were honored 
by the Massachusetts Chapter of the National Association of Housing & Redevelopment Officials (Mass 
NAHRO) for their service to the community and to the Housing Authority. Board member, Albert DiLisio 
received the NAHRO Distinguished Service Award for 30 years of service to the Swampscott Housing 
Authority as an elected Board member. Board member, Barbara Eldridge received the NAHRO 
Distinguished Service Award for 25 years of service to the Swampscott Housing Authority as an elected 
Board member. The staff of the Housing Authority and the remaining Board members, offer their 
congratulations to Mr. DiLisio and Mrs. Eldridge for their well deserved NAHRO Service Awards and 
add their thanks to the honored Board members for their many years of dedicated service to the 
Authority, to the tenants and the Town of Swampscott. 

Once again the Swampscott Housing Authority would like to thank Swampscott Police Patrolman, 
Saverio (Savy) Caruso for his invaluable assistance as the Swampscott Police Department liaison to the 
Housing Authority. The Authority wishes to acknowledge the assistance of the Swampscott Fire and 
Police Departments and the Action Ambulance Company for their consistently professional, yet 
compassionate demeanor while responding to the numerous medical assistance and "Are You Ok Calls" 
especially at the elderly/handicapped communities. The Authority also thanks Police Chief Ron Madigan 
and Fire Chief, Kevin Breen for their respective Departments' response to fire and public safety calls at all 
the housing areas. The Swampscott Housing Authority would also like to acknowledge the contributions 
of other Town departments and officials to the fulfillment of the Housing Authority mission of providing 
safe, sanitary, low cost housing to qualified tenants. We gratefully acknowledge the efforts of Gino Cresta 
and the Department of Public Works for many services, especially the sanding and salting the elderly 
housing parking lots during the winter, as well as efforts by Victoria A. Masone, Assistant Town Engineer 
assisting the Authority regarding the legal status of the roadway known as Doherty Circle. 

The Board of Governors, the Executive Director, and the staff of the Swampscott Housing 
Authority continue to be committed to providing safe, comfortable and affordable housing for qualified 
tenants. 

Respectfully submitted, 

James L. Hughes 
Chairperson 



165 



Metropolitan Area Planning Council Annual Report I 2010 



The Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC) is a regional planning 
agency serving the people who live and work in the 101 cities and towns of 

Greater Boston. With a mission to promote smart growth and regional 
collaboration, MAPC's work is guided by our regional plan, "MetroFuture: 

Making a Greater Boston Region." 



This year, we have increasingly focused our work on helping municipalities to collaborate across 
city and town borders, to achieve savings through new efficiencies, to capitalize on the existing 
and multifaceted resources of Greater Boston, and to explore innovation in unexpected ways. As 
fiscal challenges have intensified at the local level, MAPC has amplified its commitment to 
partnering with cities and towns in offering progressive solutions. We're expanding our reach 
into new areas - from the federal policy arena, to green energy development, and interactive 
gaming as a tool for community engagement - while keeping an eye toward preservation, 
sustainability, and responsible stewardship of our shared resources. In every effort we undertake, 
MAPC works toward a more equitable, livable Greater Boston region. 

This year, we are heartened to have the Obama Administration's support for the smart growth 
ideals put forth in our regional plan, MetroFuture. We are honored to be among a select group of 
grant recipients from the Sustainable Communities Partnership, a new federal collaboration 
among HUD, the EPA, and the U.S. Department of Transportation. With this grant, MAPC can 
go further in promoting sustainable development in Greater Boston. 

The coming year will bring the first activities under the grant, which could total more than $4.5 
million over three years when matching commitments from regional foundations are included. 
The Metro Boston Sustainable Communities Consortium - which includes municipalities, non- 
profits, and institutional allies - will oversee our work under the grant. The heart of the work 
plan features several illustrative projects poised to benefit from Sustainable Communities 
funding. 

They include: 

• Enhancing the Fairmount transit corridor through Dorchester, Mattapan and Hyde 
Park in Boston; 

• Engaging the Asian communities in Chinatown, Quincy, and Maiden in planning 
efforts; 

• Creating an anti-displacement strategy for residential areas along the planned Green 
Line extension in Somerville; 

• Identifying priority preservation and development areas along the Route 495/MetroWest 
corridor; and 

• Studying office park retrofit potential for the Framingham Tech Park, and exploring 
opportunities for linkage to the downtown commuter rail station. 

All of these initiatives - and others that will be added as the program develops - will help the 
region to plan and grow responsibly, with a focus on future stewardship of our shared resources. 



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Metropolitan Area Planning Council Annual Report | 2010 



In addition to this local work, MAPC will develop tools and models, build skills and capacity 
throughout the region, design and advocate for smart growth policies in state and local 
government, and track the region's progress through a Regional Indicators Program. 

At the core of our mission is serving as a resource to our member municipalities. One of the most 
important ways MAPC serves cities and towns is to foster forward-thinking economic 
development opportunities. In 2011, we are focusing much of our economic development work 
in clean energy and local business development. 

MAPC links federal resources to emerging green technology start-ups like the Fraunhofer Center 
for Sustainable Energy Systems. Fraunhofer is a non-profit applied research and development 
laboratory located in the heart of Boston's Innovation District on the South Boston waterfront, 
dedicated to the commercialization of clean energy technologies. We also provide support and 
advocacy for emerging business incubators such as the Cleantech InnoVenture Center in Lynn. 
This business incubator is designed to reduce the start-up expenses of small clean technology 
companies, while accelerating the time it takes to transform a research idea into a marketable 
product. 

In Gloucester, MAPC is helping to build a cluster of marine research institutes on and around 
the harbor - adding strength to a historic fishing-based economy. We are also working with the 
Dorchester Bay Economic Development Corporation to place job training facilities within 
walking distance of neighborhoods in need, and to provide skill-based training in partnership 
with larger businesses that are seeking trained employees. 

MAPC also plans to unveil a web-based business development tool that will allow cities in 
Greater Boston's urban core to market hard-to-sell commercial and industrial real estate to 
appropriate buyers. The website. Choose Metro Boston, can be found at 
www.choosemetroboston.com. 



Our energy planning will continue to grow as we start developing energy strategies for Chelsea 
and Revere, and as we explore similar opportunities across the region. All our green energy work 
is guided by our Green Energy Campaign, which is an effort to achieve the energy goals of 
MetroFuture by building local capacity, increasing energy efficiency, and developing alternate 
energy resources. In the coming year, proposed energy-related projects include developing a 
regional ESCO, or Energy Services Company, which would provide comprehensive energy 
efficiency services for multiple municipalities and school districts; developing a site suitability 
assessment for wind or solar energy on closed landfill and brownfield sites; and creating a 
regional energy manager service, which would provide MAPC staff support for a wide range of 
local energy work. 

In many municipalities, MAPC can best help to achieve smart growth goals through targeted 
zoning bylaw work. This year, MAPC worked with the town of Littleton Planning Board, Board 
of Selectmen and a faithful cadre of concerned citizens over several months to draft, review and 
finalize two zoning bylaws: a new Village Common zone, and an Overlay zone. 



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Metropolitan Area Planning Council Annual Report 2010 



The Village Common zone created a new business district along Routes 119 and 110, where 
mixed use development will be allowed so long as new design guidelines are met. In the Overlay 
zone, created along Route 1 19, a vacant 90-acre site once owned by Cisco Systems may now be 
more easily redeveloped. MAPC presented the zoning changes at Town Meeting, helping to 
usher the bylaws toward adoption. Both zoning changes will help the town control and attract 
development consistent with both MetroFuture and the community's vision. 

The District Local Technical Assistance (DLTA) program is another essential vehicle for 
helping communities to achieve such goals. DLTA is a state funding program that helps cities 
and towns to collaborate regionally on housing, economic development, and environmental 
protection projects. The funding can also be used to help municipalities to coordinate and more 
efficiently deliver local services. 2010 was by any measure a prolific year for DLTA-funded 
projects in municipalities throughout the region. 

There were a total of 19 projects approved for funding this year - 10 in land use planning, and 
nine in municipal services. More than two dozen communities received help from MAPC on 
land use planning projects thanks to DLTA fiinding, the majority involving research or drafting 
local zoning bylaws. There are 39 cities and towns currently participating in municipal services 
projects, such as examining how to save funds or provide expanded services by sharing 
engineering staff, public health offices, and even ambulances. Since many of these projects affect 
multiple municipalities, the total number of cities and towns served is 57 - a record high for the 
program. 

With DLTA funding, MAPC and the MetroWest Regional Collaborative are conducting a 
MetroWest Regional Open Space Connectivity study. This study will coordinate all the 
individual open space plans among MetroWest cities and towns, allowing open spaces to become 
linked into an interconnected network that will cross municipal boundaries and serve a variety of 
regional needs. The study will also identify and prioritize lands that are ripe for protection or 
acquisition for open space. 

Using DLTA funds, MAPC assisted Bellingham in writing a Housing Production Plan in 2010, 
the first of what we hope will be many such plans crafted by MAPC. Housing Production Plans 
help cities and towns guide local affordable housing developments. Another tool, the Smart 
Growth Zoning and Housing Act (Chapter 40R), offers financial incentives to encourage cities 
and towns to zone for compact residential and mixed-use development in smart growth locations. 
These districts are catching on slowly across Eastern Massachusetts, and MAPC is currently 
working to prepare a 40R District for Sharon. 

On the North Shore, MAPC is working with Beverly, Danvers, Hamilton, Ipswich, Salem and 
Wenham to solicit local input on Priority Development Areas and Priority Preservation 
Areas, as part of a $68,000 grant from the Massachusetts Executive Office of Housing and 
Economic Development. 



168 



Metropolitan Area Planning Council Annual Report i 2010 

Transportation planning is central to all facets of MAPC's work. The economic vitality of the 
region is dependent on a strong transportation network, and continued investment in all modes of 
transportation - roads, bridges, sidewalks, bicycle infrastructure, and public transit - is crucial to 
Greater Boston's ongoing competitiveness. 

MAPC works toward sustainable transportation projects throughout the year, including the 
regional bike share system that is projected to launch in Boston in spring 2011. MAPC is 
collaborating with Boston, Cambridge, Somerville, and Brookline to link into Boston's system 
once it is established. The program will provide hundreds of stations, outfitted with several 
thousand bicycles, throughout the participating municipalities. Designed for short trips, the bike 
share system will provide a sustainable mode of transportation while extending access to public 
transit locations across the region. MAPC worked with Boston and the MBTA to secure a $3 
million Federal Transit Administration grant to implement the program in 201 1. 

In 2010, MAPC unveiled a comprehensive Pedestrian Transportation Plan with action steps 
that cities and towns can take to make their streets more walkable. Both a resource and a guide, 
the Pedestrian Transportation Plan identifies actions that local governments, advocacy groups, 
the private sector and individuals can take to increase pedestrian safety and convenience and to 
encourage more walking. The plan is available on our website, at www.mapc.org/resources/ped- 
plan. 

MAPC is working collaboratively with three towns on the Upper Charles River to help them 
adapt to a series of new federal storm water regulations. Bellingham, Franklin and Milford were 
selected this year by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to pilot stricter storm water 
regulations. These regulations are required to reduce unhealthy rates of pollution in the Charles 
River. 



The new regulations will attempt to reduce storm water flow and contaminated runoff into the 
watershed from private and public properties, which could cost the towns and property owners 
several million dollars to retrofit existing infrastructure. The regulations may eventually be 
extended to the rest of the Charles River and other watersheds in the region. 

To assist with these challenges, MAPC is working with three towns to explore creation of a 
storm water utility, a public entity that maintains storm water infrastructure and performs needed 
upgrades and capital improvements. As with water or sewer utilities, costs are covered by user 
fees, which are assessed on each property owner that contributes storm water runoff. 

Another area in which MAPC aids cities and towns in planning for the future is public safety. As 
municipal budgets grow tighter, cities and towns are increasingly seeking ways to maintain 
public safety services in the face of cuts, to build emergency preparedness, and to enhance their 
expertise by working with neighbors and allies. In keeping with our mission to promote regional 
collaboration, MAPC has helped to establish three regional emergency equipment cache sites, 
containing reserves of emergency equipment for large-scale use. The three sites - in Beverly, 
Framingham, and Lexington - help the region to be prepared for a major incident, by providing 
resources that municipalities most likely could not afford on their own. 



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Metropolitan Area Planning Council Annual Report j 2010 



The cache sites offer first responders and public safety officials such equipment as shelters-in-a- 
box, cyanide detectors, cots, illuminated signs, and other tools for disaster preparedness. MAPC 
works in tandem with NERAC, the Northeast Homeland Security Regional Advisory Council, to 
offer these vital resources through a federal homeland security grant program. 

Throughout this year, despite of several budget cuts, the Metro Mayors Community Safety 
Initiative worked to maintain a strong police presence in troubled areas of the region through the 
Metro Gang Task Force and through additional patrols funded by the anti-crime Shannon 
Grant. High-risk and gang-involved youth experience intervention and prevention through 
Shannon Grant-funded programs, including more than 600 out-of-school activities and 
employment opportunities. 

MAPC also helps municipalities to save money through our collective purchasing efforts, which 
allow cities and towns to make discounted bulk purchases of supplies, equipment, vehicles and 
more. Since its inception in 1998, the program has assisted dozens of municipal clients in saving 
millions of dollars. This year, we announced an exciting new partnership with the Fire Chiefs 
Association of Massachusetts, allowing MAPC to act as a collective purchasing agent for fire 
apparatus. This program has lots of potential to help communities save local dollars on major 
purchases, while improving the caliber of emergency vehicles and response capabilities. 

Another way MAPC is working with NERAC to support emergency planning is through a new 
evacuation route planning tool, which kicked off in 2010. The goal of the program is to create 
an intuitive mapping application that will provide local emergency responders with critical 
information during emergencies and evacuations. The project will feature online maps and a 
mapping application that will let users coordinate evacuations by referencing electronic route 
maps and resources from inside emergency response vehicles or emergency command centers. 

MAPC staff is also working on a first-in-the-nation dataset analyzing driving patterns, fuel 
consumption, and greenhouse gas emissions. Working in collaboration with MassGIS and the 
MIT Department of Urban Studies and Planning, we will collect and analyze data on vehicle 
miles travelled and fuel consumption based on odometer readings from vehicle inspection 
records. The data will help local, state, and regional entities develop effective strategies to reduce 
transportation-related greenhouse gas emissions and their associated climate impacts. The data 
also answer MetroFuture's call to focus new development in transportation-efficient locations. 

MAPC and WalkBoston are also conducting research on which school districts in the MAPC 
region have the best potential for encouraging more students to walk to school. This "Safe 
Routes to School" Analysis aims to shift school trips from cars to feet, which can reduce 
greenhouse gas production, air pollution, and traffic congestion around schools. Several studies 
estimate that up to 30 percent of morning commuter traffic is actually generated by parents 
driving children to school. Shifting even a small percentage back to walking could result in 
measurable reductions in emissions, as well as health benefits for children and community 
benefits for their neighborhoods. Once the most promising walkable school districts are 
identified, MAPC and WalkBoston will work with participating municipalities to devise a plan 
for increasing the number of students who walk to school in those areas. 



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Metropolitan Area Planning Council Annual Reporti 2010 



MAPC, an official Census Affiliate, helped promote Census participation throughout 2010, and 
will continue to monitor the results of the Census as data are released in 20 11. As the data come 
out, MAPC will assist municipalities and non-profit partners with training and technical 
assistance. Data release schedules, new data and municipal profiles about your city or town, as 
well as training opportunities, can be found on the MetroBoston DataCommon, MAPC's online 
mapping tool, at www.metrobostondatacommon.org . 

As we work collaboratively and in innovative new ways throughout the year, we are mindful that 
all we do is guided by our bold regional plan, "MetroFuture." 

The development of the MetroFuture plan involved thousands of "plan builders" around the 
region, a group MAPC is now working to turn into "plan implementers," who will work to 
advance MetroFuture at the local, regional, and state levels. To engage old and new allies alike, 
MAPC launched the Friends of MetroFuture program with a well-attended open house in 
January 2010. This program will educate the public about key issues relating to MetroFuture 
implementation, and will build public energy for the change necessary to achieve MetroFuture's 
goals. In the past year, the program has sponsored a photo contest, eight speakers on a wide 
range of topics, and three walking tours in the summer months, with similar activities planned 
for 201 1. Check www.metrofuture.org for the full agenda. 

As always, building a constituency for change involves many partnerships with other like- 
minded organizations. MAPC was a founding member in the Massachusetts Smart Growth 
Alliance (MSGA), and remains active in its work. This year, MAPC and the MSGA kicked off 
the Great Neighborhoods Initiative, a campaign to link smart growth policy with 
place-based results. Throughout 2011, MAPC and MSGA will work with several local 
organizations around the region as they make their neighborhoods into smart growth models. 

Finally, building regional support for smart growth principles requires research, expertise, a 
demonstrated record of local success, and - importantly - a commitment to legislative advocacy. 
We are proud to be pointing to a demonstrated track record of success both on Beacon Hill and 
in Washington. 

MAPC furthered its agenda of fostering regional collaboration by participafing in the 
legislatively mandated Regionalization Advisory Commission. Chaired by Lieutenant 
Governor Timothy Murray, the commission studied impediments and benefits of regionalization 
over a broad spectrum of topics, ranging fi"om public safety to energy and backroom office 
support. MAPC will use the findings of the commission's report to file a comprehensive piece of 
legislafion in the 2011-2012 session, which will incenfivize and remove barriers to sharing 
services across municipal boundaries. Additionally, MAPC and the MSGA were successful for 
the first time in advancing a piece of land use reform legislation favorably out of committee. 
Passage of comprehensive land use reform will continue to be a major priority for MAPC in the 
upcoming year. 

Check www.mapc.org for news and updates about MAPC's work throughout the year. 



171 



North Shore Task Force 
Annual Report 2010 



Beverly, Danvers, Essex, Hamilton, Gloucester, Ipswich, Manchester 
by the Sea, Marblehead, Middleton, Nahant, Peabody, Rockport, 
Salem, Swampscott, Tops field and Wen ham 



During 2010, the North Shore Task Force took part in a variety of 
activities, including: 

• Holding two work workshops devoted looking at the challenges and 
opportunities faced by municipalities financing and siting wind and 
solar renewable energy projects. 

• Conducting a US Census Outreach Forum to help raise awareness of 
the 2010 Census and the importance of developing contacts in all 
communities, particularly in "hard to count" are^s such as dormitories 
and apartments. 

• Coordinating to provide input and discussion on the North Shore, six 
town Regional Development, Open space and Transportation Grant 
funded by the Executive Office of Housing and Economic 
Development. The six towns involved in the grant were Beverly, 
Danvers, Ipswich, Hamilton, Salem and Wenham. The grant helped 
participating communities become aware of overall North Shore 
community development issues and can serve as a precursor for more 
regional development collaboration under MetroFuture and the 
Sustainable Communities Program. 

• Partnering with the MA Department of Energy Resources to sponsor an 
update on the Green Communities Program including which North 
Shore municipalities have become certified Green Communities, which 



172 



are in the process of doing so and learning about new energy 
efficiency and renewable energy projects within the region. 

Reviewing and offering input into a variety of regional transportation 
programs, including the Transportation Improvement Program, the 
Unified Planning and Work Program and the Regional Transportation 
Plan, as well as opportunities to participate in Transportation Demand 
Management and Suburban Mobility programs. 

Reviewing and offering input on both the 2009 Danversport Mixed Use 
and the 2010 Peabody/Salem Corridor Action Plan MAPC funded 
District Local Technical Assistance projects. 

Participating in a workshop co-sponsored by EPA Region One on the 
draft MS4 Stormwater Management Permit. Communities and private 
sector attendees learned of new requirements being considered in the 
new permit and made aware of the opportunity to comment on the 
draft language. 

Hearing a presentation from MAPC staff on the proposed 
Comprehensive Land Use Partnership Act (CLURPA) as part of a two- 
meeting process to review and comment on both CLURPA and 
preliminary MAPC 201 1 legislative priorities. 

Identifying ongoing North Shore planning and community 
development issues through Community Exchange, in which local 
planners and decision makers share key issues or developments with 
fellow NSTF attendees. 

Presenting a new opportunity to work with the recently formed MAPC 
Energy Services Program to help North Shore Communities work with 
MAPC staff in order to take full advantage of existing state and federal 
renewable energy programs, increase municipal energy efficiency and 
site municipal renewable energy projects. 



173 



For more information, visit www.mapc.orq/subreqions/nstf . 



174 



NORTH SHORE REGIONAL VOCATIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 
30 LOG BRIDGE ROAD, MIDDLETON, MA 01949-2806 
www.nsths.net 

ANNUAL REPORT 
JANUARY 1, 2010 - DECEMBER 31, 2010 

William Jackson - Swampscott Representative 
North Shore Regional Vocational School Committee 

Daniel R. O'Connell, Superintendent-Director 
North Shore Regional Vocational School District 

Merger Study 

The plan to build a $133 million high school that proponents say will transform vocational education on the North 
Shore finally became a reality in December. 

The Owners Project Manager (0PM) and New District Fee Negotiation team completed design fee and scope 
negotiations. Negotiations resulted in a reduction from approximately 10% of total construction cost to 
approximately 7.9%. A Notice of Intent to Award a Contract was approved by the full School Committee and sent 
to the architect. The next step will be to finalize the draft Massachusetts School Building Authority's (MSBA) 
Construction Manager (CM) at Risk contract with the architect, 0PM and MSBA legal counsel. 

The OPM completed the application with information provided by the Superintendents relative to construction 
experience. The OPM will secure the signature of the School Committee Chair to the application and submit to the 
state. 

The Architect and Engineering teams began Program Review and Early Design Development Phase. The School 
Superintendents have scheduled "Design Focus Group Meetings" with teacher, staff and administrative personnel 
from each school. This review will allow new district representatives to have input on the previously completed 
schematic phase and re-introduce the project to all stakeholders. 

After compiling and analyzing the Design Focus Groups data, the Architect will move into the Design Development 
Phase of the project where scaled layouts and building elevations will be drawn and specifications will also begin to 
be developed. 

All necessary plans and specifications will be finalized into a package of documents suitable for bidding. The CM 
at risk firm will assist the project team in insuring the best and most accurate plans and specs are developed lending 
their experience as "builders" into the design process. 

Construction Phase 

10/20/201 1 to 01/20/2014 Construction of new buildings and playing fields 
02/20/14 to 06/20/2014 Demolition old buildings and finish fields 
09/0 1/2014 New School Year Begins 

The Essex North Shore Agricultural & Technical School District has hired Richard Manley of Edwards Angell 
Palmer & Dodge LLP as bond counsel and Peter Frazier, Senior Vice President, of FirstSouthwest as financial 
planner for the construction project. A preliminary bonding schedule for payment by sending communities will be 
distributed during the month of February. Interest only will be assessed for 2012 and 2013. The North Shore 
Technical High School website (www.nsths.net) will continuously update all merger progress in the future. 
Administration 

The North Shore Regional Vocational School District Committee, comprised of one member appointed to represent each 
member community, is the governing body of the School District. The Superintendent-Director and the administrative 
team carry out the policies of the District School Comrriittee and oversee the daily operation of the school. 



175 



Curriculum 

Over the course of the past year administrators and faculty have worked collaboratively to increase the instructional 
rigor in each of the four academic areas to better prepare our students for collegiate studies or employment. The 
following initiatives have been implemented: 

• Each content area has designed a research paper so students have the opportunity to complete a minimum 
of one paper in each of their four years of attendance. 

• MCAS-like comment assessments in all four grade levels have been developed in order to prepare students 
for state testing as well as to allow us to obtain "real time" data on our students' knowledge and the 
effectiveness of our instruction. In English, we have had one set of assessments independently scored by a 
former MCAS designer in order to obtain consistent scoring. 

• "Writing with Colors" has been introduced to the English Department. This program equips students with 
the skills to include a thesis statement, transitions, supporting details, commentary and analysis, and style 
in their writing so that their work is ultimately a more complete piece. Because of its effectiveness, 
students have begun to utilize this program in other content areas. 

• Walk-Throughs by administrators in both academic and vocational learning environments have been 
focused and in line with our school improvement plan. 

General and Program Advisory Committees 

The Program Advisory Committees meet twice per year to discuss suggestions for improving our vocational- 
technical programs. The instructors use these meetings to learn about the latest equipment, materials, techniques, 
and technology being used in industry. Improvement in curriculum and delivery of instruction are directly related to 
these suggestions and industrial standards. 

The General Advisory Committee consists of one member from each of the Program Advisory Committees and the 
school Principal. Each member has specific recommendations from their advisory committee and advice for how to 
improve the vocational delivery system and maintain the high industrial standards and integrity of each program. 
The General Advisory Committee discusses articulation agreements, integration into the curriculum for academics 
and career areas, the OSHA 10-hour card online training, and the diversity representation of our advisory 
committees. Another key task for the General Advisory Committees this year is to offer input on the design of the 
new merged North Shore Technical High School and Essex Agricultural and Technical High School building 
project to ensure that both the design and space of the vocational areas will provide students with the optimal 
learning environment. 

Vocational Career and Technical Area 

Reading the Labor Market Blueprint published this past October by the Workforce Investment Board, it re-enforced 
my assessment that North Shore Technical (NST) is definitely on the right track. Current priorities here at NST 
include helping our students develop strong foundation skills (math and science), technology skills, the 
development of their soft skills and the importance of a good work ethic; all recommendations made in the 
executive summary of that report. These areas are priorities in at NST and are taught every day in our technical 
shops, their related classes and their PDP classes. 

Three of the four areas identified as critical drivers of labor market demand are in the areas of Construction, Health 
Care and Durable Goods manufacturing. These programs are well established at NST and continue to grow. One 
focus of our technical programs is to ensure that students receive recognizable certifications to help them be 
successful in their chosen field. Students are also taught the importance of green technology and concepts to 
complete tasks. 

The importance of practicing safe work habits, integration with the academic classes and creating a portfolio are all 
areas that are worked on in their technical area. In addition students participate in the Skill/USA program, which 
helps students improve their technical skills by competing against students from other technical high schools in their 
chosen field. 

Technology 

We are continually updating the wiring in the building with newer, more reliable, Cat 6 cables. A new Intermediate 
Distribution Frame was assembled and contains networking equipment in order to deliver increased connectivity to 
areas that are furthest away from our Main Distribution Frame. 



January 2010 to December 2010 2 
Short Form Annual Report 



176 



Our Internet service has been upgraded with new Comcast lines coming into the building. The speed of our Internet 
has increased substantially. We now host our own website with a new address of http://www.nsths.net . Moodle, a 
Learning Management System and customizable platform for teachers and learners, is new to the building. 



Google Apps for Education has been put into practice, which combines email, chat, documents and scheduling for 
integrated communication in and out of the building. Students and faculty can access their email and calendars from 
any computer or mobile device. 

New, state of the art, SmartBoard, interactive whiteboards have been installed in English and History classrooms. 

All parents are provided with an iParent account which allows access to view, via the Internet, their child's school 
information, including biographical, attendance, discipline, schedule, assignments and grades 

Our cafeteria has joined the 2r' century with the addition of Point of Sales software and two new touch screen 
registers speeding up the service lines. 

Students continue to develop skills in word processing, Internet, global communications, spreadsheets, graphics, 
desktop publishing, and multimedia throughout grades 9-12. 

Professional Development 

For the past two years, professional development activities have focused on the areas of the school improvement plan 
which address teaching and learning as well as school safety and climate. 

Major initiatives included were: 

Co-teaching; Differentiated Instruction; Integration of Academic and Vocational Curriculum; Improving Writing; 
Integration of Technology; Improving MCAS Scores; and Curriculum Development and Alignment to the State 
Standards. 

Special Education Department 

There are approximately 148 students at North Shore Technical High School who have been identified as having 
special needs; they represent 32% of the general student population. Programs and services are provided and 
administered by a staff comprised of an administrator, a full-time team chairperson, nine special education teachers, 
a speech/language pathologist, a certified reading specialist, a school psychologist, a behavioral consultant, four 
instructional aides, and one secretary. All special education staff is highly qualified in accordance with the No 
Child Left Behind regulations. 

Athletic Department 

The Boy's & Girl's Basketball teams continued to have a good number of participants. The boy's team won its 
first league championship since 1985. The boys also won the State Vocational Championship, and qualified for the 
MIAA state tournament. 

The girl's team was awarded the MIAA Division IV Girl's Basketball Team Sportsmanship Award and received 
their recognition on the floor of Boston Garden during the state tournament rounds. 

This year the boy's and girl's basketball teams have merged with Essex Aggie making all of our sports co-op at this 
time. The boy's are practicing and playing at North Shore and the girl's are practicing and playing at Essex Aggie. 
There has been a very large turnout for both teams and we are looking forward to successfiil seasons. 

Four North Shore students were again granted waivers for the 2009-2010 season to play Ice Hockey at their sending 
communities. This waiver is only being grandfathered for those students who were in our program before it was 
dropped. There are only two remaining this winter. 

Winter Track had very low participation levels during the 2009 - 2010, season, and consideration had to be made as 
to its viability. Fortunately, we have 35 students participating this winter and an additional coach was again added. 

The spring of 2010 saw the Softball team win another league championship and qualifying once again for the state 
and vocational tournaments. The team advanced to the quarter finals of the North Sectionals in the State Tourney. 



January 2010 to December 2010 
Short Form Annual Report 



177 



The Baseball team finished in 2""^ place and qualified for the state tournament. Both Baseball and softball continue 
to have enough participation to support varsity, junior varsity, and freshman teams. 



Boy's Lacrosse, in its second year, continued to show improvement. Participation rates were high enough to 
schedule a full junior varsity schedule 

Girls Lacrosse, sponsored by Essex Aggie, also had a good turnout and played a varsity and junior varsity schedule. 

This fall, the football team finished with a 9 - 2 regular season record, and would go on to win the State Super Bowl 
Championship beating Tri-County. 

The Volleyball team, under new head coach Karen Masiello, improved its winning percentage this season and again 
had a very large number of participants. We actually had to have two junior varsity squads again this year and are 
planning to have a freshman team next year. 

Girl's soccer, after winning two lower division league championships in its first two years, was moved to the upper 
division in the league. Although they did not win a league championship this year they did qualify for the state and 
vocational tournaments. 

Boy's Soccer finished in second place again this year and qualified for the state tournament. 
Fall Cheering continue to improve their performance levels and again qualified for State Competitions. 
The programs are running well and the participation rate continues to be very high for a Vocational School. 
Career Exploratory 

The focus of the Career Exploratory Program is to familiarize all ninth grade students with North Shore Technical 
High School's career vocational/technical areas. Mr. Dan Connors, our ninth grade guidance counselor worked 
with each of our ninth graders to provide a more individual guidance program. Our ninth graders require close 
support to assist them in their adjustment of both their vocational and academic responsibilities as high school 
students. 

Currently, ninth graders explore twelve vocational programs. The exploratory program is designed so each student 
spends five days, four periods in shop and four periods in academics every other week. This schedule allows for 
smaller shop classes so that our teachers are able to evaluate student more comprehensively. Students will complete 
the exploratory program in the early spring and will then re-explore three shops before making their final shop 
selection. 

A special effort was made by the guidance staff to locate and support students interested in non-traditional shops. 
Non-traditional upper class students and alumni speak to interested ninth graders about the opportunities in their 
vocational program. 

Career Awareness 

Throughout the year, all students participate in a variety of career planning activities in the newly established Career 
Center. This designated space is utilized by the Guidance Department in collaboration with the CVTE instructors to 
deliver activities related to career planning. A new requirement for all students to obtain a Certificate of 
Occupational Proficiency is the development of a Four Year Career Plan. 

Tech Prep 

Tech Prep, a federally funded program, establishes articulation agreements between high school students and post- 
secondary institutions. This program develops career pathways that allow for seamless transition from high school 
to college programs of study, creating opportunities for high school students to earn college credits. 

During the 2009-2010 school year, articulations in ITS, Health, Culinary and Graphics were renewed. In addition, 
articulations were newly developed with Central Maine Community College, Southern New Hampshire Community 
College and Bunker Hill Community College. 



January 2010 to December 2010 
Short Form Annual Report 



178 



The Tech Prep Consortium at North Shore Community College provided our students with the following activities: 

• College/Career Expo 

• On the Spot Admissions 

• Career Days for Non-Traditional Students 

• Career Days for Grade 1 1 and 12 Students 

• Culinary Competition 

• Accuplacer Testing 

• Accuplacer Test Prep Course 

• College Shadow Days 

• 21" Century Career Day at BHCC 

• Pre-advising Day 

• College Fair 

• Lahey Clinic visit 

• Guidance Curriculum and Career Planning Course taught by Ms. Doherty for the second time 

• Professions Speaker Day for Grade 1 students 

Dual Enrollment 

Dual enrollment is a program offered to eligible high school juniors and seniors who want to earn both high school 
and college credits simultaneously by taking courses at publicly founded higher education institutions. Students 
from the class of 2010 participated in these programs at North Shore Community College and Salem State College. 

During the 2010-1 1 school year, two seniors from Information Technology Services will participate as full-time 
students in the dual enrollment program at Johnson and Wales. 

Cooperative Education 

Cooperative Education provides seniors the opportunity to develop academic, technical and employability skills in a 
work-based setting. 

During the 2009-2010 school year, twenty-five (25) junior and senior students went out on co-op. These jobs 
resulted in fiill-time employment for graduates not attending post-secondary schools. 

Senior Placement 

The class of 2010 saw 36% of its graduates matriculate to a two year school, 24% to a four year school, 8%) enlisted 
in the Military and 30% were placed in jobs related to their career programs. 

Transportation Department 

The Transportation Department is currently looking into a gradual transition into the busing of Essex Aggie students 
prior to the merger. Hopefully this will be complete before the merger. This will spread the expense over a few 
years instead of waiting and getting hit with the expense all at once. The size of our fleet will gradually be 
increased to accomplish this. 

Adult Education 

Adult Evening Education at North Shore is a self-supporting program that offers approximately sixty (60) vocational- 
technical classes that enhance the professional and personal lives of the adult members of our community. The Program 
serves nearly one thousand adult students that participate in a wide variety of courses. 

New this year, the Adult Education Program initiated the development of online course capabilities and has presented our 
first online course in webpage design. It is our hope to expand our offerings in the near future. 

Business Office 

The Department of Revenue has certified the amount in our unencumbered excess and deficiency fiinds available 
July 1,2010 at $463,685. 

The Fiscal Year 2012 Budget preparation is currently in process and will be presented to the District's Finance & 
Property Policy Sub-Committee in February and subsequently to the District's School Committee. At this point, we 

January 2010 to December 2010 5 
Short Form Annual Report 



179 



have not received financial data pertaining to fiscal 2012 from the Department of Elementary and Secondary 
Education. Preliminary figures are expected to be released in mid January. 

We continue to work diligently to reduce costs and increase local revenues. Service contracts continue to be 
reviewed and quotes, in some instances, are requested when not required. We are using our district buses to 
transport Essex Agricultural students for a fee and are continuing cooperative athletic programs and share costs with 
Essex Agricultural and technical high school. 

North Shore's FY 2010 and 201 1 budgets had 1% and 1.89% increases respectively, as we've requested level funded 
budgets by departments for the last two years and will do the same for the FY 2012 budget. 



January 2010 to December 2010 
Short Form Annual Report 



180 



6 



North Shore Regional Vocational School Committee 



Beverly 

Boxford 

Danvers 

Essex 

Gloucester 

Hamilton 

Lynnfield 

Manchester-by-the-Sea 

Marblehead 

Middleton 

Nahant 

Rockport 

Mr. Thomas St. 

Swampscott 

Topsfield 

Wenham 



Mr. Dean Porteous 

Mr. Michael Crowe 

Mr. Russell Fravel 

Mr. George R. Harvey, Chairman 

Ms. Melissa Teixeira 

Mr. David W. Ketcham 

Dr. Paul Anderson 

Mr. Joseph Sabella 

Mrs. Marcia Sweeney, Vice Chair 

Mrs. Ellen Weitzler 

Mr. Mark Small Salem 
Pierre 
Mr. William Jackson 
Ms. Trudi Perry 

Mr. William O. Nichols, Secretary 



January 2010 to December 2010 
Short Form Annual Report 



181 



7 



PERSONNEL BOARD 

Peter C. McCarriston 
David S. Van Dam 
Demise Dembkoski 
Nancy A. Lord, Ex-Officio 

PERSONNEL DEPARTMENT 

Nancy A. Lord, Personnel Manager 

The Personnel Department continues in its practice of monitoring personnel policies and 
procedures to ensure fair and consistent employment practices for all Town employees and to maintain a 
safe, working environment that is free from harassment and discrimination. 

The Personnel Department continues to assist management with the interpretation of the various 
collective bargaining agreements and the Personnel Policy Governing Compensation & Employment 
Benefits, which covers those employees who are exempt from a collective bargaining agreement. The 
department is responsible for maintaining attendance records to ensure proper use of sick, vacation, 
personal, FMLA and other leave time in accordance with the various contracts and the Personnel Policy. 

Over the past year, the Personnel Department has assisted in the hiring process for new 
employees, including Laborers for the Department of Public Works as well as approximately sixty 
temporary, seasonal summer employees for the Recreation Department. The Personnel Department is 
also responsible for requesting Criminal Offender Record information (CORI) on all volunteers who work 
for the Senior Work Off program who my work with a vulnerable population, volunteers for the Recreation 
Department and all newly hired employees who are not exempt form this process. In addition, the 
delegation process for civil service appointments has been shifted from the State Human Resource 
Division to the Town creating greater responsibility in the hiring process of police officers and fire fighters 
to the Chiefs, Personnel Department and Appointing Authority. 

The Personnel Manager continues to hear grievances at the Step 2 process in accordance with 
the various collective bargaining agreements. In addition to confidential, personnel related issues, the 
Personnel Department is responsible for reporting workers compensation injuries, handling all required 
paperwork for civil service examinations, promotions, layoffs etc., preparing appointment and 
reappointment notification to individual positions, boards, committees and commissions, conducting 
salary surveys and serves as backup to the Board of Selectmen's office during the absence of the 
Administrative Assistant and as needed. 

Under the direction of the Town Administrator, the Personnel Department continues to implement 
new and established polices which provide useful guidelines for both the employees and the department 
heads. 

The Personnel Board met on March 24'^ and April 15'^ prior to the Annual Town Meeting and in 
accordance with Article XV of the Personnel Policy. Only minor changes were made to the Policy. Due 
to budgetary constraints, there was no increase to the Salary Classification Plan effective for July 1, 2010. 

In October 2010, long time member David Van Dam resigned his position on the Personnel Board 
when he was elected as a Selectman. Mr. Van Dam was a valuable asset to the Board who was always 
readily available to meet and discuss any issues before the Board. Mr. Van Dam will be sorely missed on 
the Personnel Board but we wish him well in his newly elected position as Selectman. 

As the Personnel Manager, I would like to express my appreciation to the members of the 
Personnel Board, the Town Administrator, Andrew Maylor, Administrative Assistant, Maureen Shultz and 
the Department Heads for their continued support. 



Sincerely, 

Nancy A. Lord 

Nancy Lord 
Personnel Manager 



182 



SWAMPSCOTT POLICE DEPARTMENT 



Fiscal Year 2010 
Mission Statement 

The Swampscott Police Department is a community-oriented police department, committed to 
providing professional service to all with fairness, compassion and respect, regardless of religion, age, 
race, color, creed, nationality or lifestyle. Working in concert with the community we endeavor to prevent 
crime, protect life and property and preserve the peace, order and safety in Swampscott. We nurture 
public trust by holding ourselves to the highest standards of performance and ethics. 



Significant Changes 
Abandoned properties 

As a consequence of the economic recession we saw a change in the number of properties 
that were foreclosed on and left vacant or abandoned. We worked with other Town departments in 
an effort to address the issues that resulted when unauthorized persons entered or remained in these 
premises, sometimes for the purpose of criminal activity. 

Law Change 

A new law was passed which allows a victim of stalking, sexual assault and/or harassment to 
obtain a harassment prevention order against his/her perpetrator. Prior to the change victims of stalking, 
sexual assault or harassment who did not have a relationship with their perpetrator were not eligible to 
obtain 209A restraining orders. Violation of the harassment order is criminally enforceable with the right to 
arrest the offender. 

New Technology 

We purchased and installed LIVESCAN fingerprinting technology and trained all officers in the 
use of the equipment. This technology allows us to positively identify those arrested persons who have 
previously had their fingerprints entered into a State and FBI database. We purchased and installed a fifth 
mobile data computer in a cruiser and a separate detective's lap top which allows greater access to 
Registry and criminal records databases to officers in the field. 

Text Tip line 

We contracted with a company to allow citizens to send tips anonymously to the police. The 
identity of the sender is protected and not available to the police, which may encourage persons who 
otherwise would not contact the police with important information, to do so without fear of retribution. 

False alarm enforcement 

We implemented a false alarm program of billing fees for repeated false alarms. The Town Bylaw 
allows for the imposition of service fees for each false alarm in excess of three in the course of a year. 

Programs 

Park and Walk Patrols 

Officers conducted Park and Walk patrols during their shift to increase accessibility and visibility 
of the Police. Patrols were generally conducted in areas where and increased police presence might be 
expected to interact positively with the public, impact a particular problem, reduce the opportunity for 
crime or generally enhance safety. 

Shannon Gang Grant 



183 



The Swampscott Police collaborated with other police departments to form the Southern Essex 
Coalition In order to look at regional issues pertaining to youth crime and gangs. Together we received a 
grant that funded activities of officers who conducted regular initiatives in each community designed to 
gather intelligence and target gang activity. Representatives from each community met on a regular basis 
to share information and experiences. 

E911 Grants 

We received two E91 1 grants. E91 1 grants are funded through a surcharge on telephone and cell 
phone service. A training grant for $5,000 was used to train several officers in customer service. A 
second grant of $29,000 was utilized primarily to offset communications staffing overtime. 

Elder Outreach 

In Swampscott there is a growing population of elders who desire to live independently but often 
fail to take advantage of available assistance. We recognize that the Police are uniquely positioned to 
identify people in need in the community and that it is vital that we refer those people to community 
resources. Sergeant John Behen and Officer Sal Caruso acted as liaisons to the Swampscott Counsel on 
Aging, the Senior Center and Swampscott Eldedy Housing. 

Care Call Program 

In FY10 the police department continued to partner with the Nahant Police Department to provide 
the services of an automated system where elders who are living alone are checked on daily by the 
police. The automated CARE CALL system, located in Nahant Police station, dials the home telephones 
of enrolled Swampscott residents at a predetermined time every day. If the resident fails to answer the 
phone a Swampscott Police Officer is dispatched to the home to check on their well being. In FY 10 
officers responded to 43 Care Call checks, 35 Assist the Elderly calls and 147 Well Being Checks. 

School Resource Officer 

The Swampscott Police Department in collaboration with the school community is committed to 
ensuring that all students receive an education in a safe environment free from harassment or threat of 
crime. 

Detective Rose Cheever as the full time School Resource Officer worked to maintain a positive 
relationship between the police and the school community. Her presence acts as a deterrent to crime and 
provides added security and safety for the school's students, faculty, and visitors. 

The School Resource Officer investigated criminal activity that occurred in or around all school 
properties and followed up on cases involving students that occurred outside of school as well, since 
many incidents carry over into the school setting. The Officer addressed issues such as aggressive 
bullying behavior by students and worked to promote teen conflict resolution. 

Detective Cheever is the Advisor to the S.A.D.D. Group ( Students Against Destructive Decisions) 
for the Swampscott Middle School and the Swampscott High School. In March of 2010, in recognition of 
the work that they did to stop students from texting while driving, she and a group of students from the 
middle school and the high school were invited to be on the Oprah Show, through a live television feed to 
her studio from Boston. In May of 2010 the SADD students conducted a Mock OUI car crash in front of 
the high school prior the high school proms to remind students of the dangers of drinking and driving. 

Throughout the school year the S.A.D.D. students from the middle school and the high school 
conducted random seat belt checks of both students and parents coming and leaving at the different 
schools, and passed out information to drivers about the dangers of distracted driving. The students from 
the SADD were invited to attend the annual conference, run by the Executive Office of Public Safety and 
Security and the Massachusetts Interscholastic Athletic Association at Gillette Stadium entitled "Stay in 
the Game" The conference focused on student athletes and Wellness Traffic Safety. 

Throughout the school year Detective Cheever and Officer Brendan Reen visited all of the local 
pre schools in town, both public and private, to talk with children about stranger danger and protecting 
themselves from a stranger abduction. They showed the children simple self defense strategies tailored 
to each specific age levels. 

Detective Cheever is a member of the Swampscott Bullying Task Force which met throughout the 
school year to devise an appropriate school Bullying Policy. She, along with school officials, attended 
awareness programs run by District Attorney's Office as well as other programs in order to understand 



184 



and address the problems of bullying and harassment in the school setting. Detective Cheever spoke at 
several P.T.A. meetings relative to Cyber Bullying and Bullying. 

Detective Cheever is a member of the Swampscott Drug and Alcohol Task Force and attended 
monthly meetings throughout the school year to discuss issues affecting the students and parents in 
town. She participated in various informational programs for parents and teens regarding Social Host 
Liability, Bullying, Underage drinking and drug use, and teen overdoses. 

Inspection of liquor establishments 

We received a $4,000 grant to conduct alcohol enforcement. A series of "Party Enforcement 
Patrols" were conducted as well as inspections of liquor establishments and an alcohol sting in 
collaboration with the Alcoholic Beverage Control Commission (ABCC.) All establishments were found to 
be in compliance with the conditions of their licenses and no businesses were cited during this year for 
serving or selling liquor to an underage youth. This represents a marked improvement over past years 

Traffic Division 

The Traffic Division worked with the community to identify and address needs and problems 
concerning vehicle traffic and parking. Persistent traffic related issues were forwarded to Lieutenant 
Thomas Stephens and Lieutenant Gary Lord. 

The Traffic Officer's duties included overseeing the winter parking permitting and enforcement 
program as well as planning for matters that impact traffic such as road construction projects and special 
events like road races. 

The Governors Highway Safety Commission funded four separate enforcement initiatives for the 
Department. These consisted of two" Click it or Ticket" and two O.U.I, enforcement efforts. We also 
received $5,000 in grant funds to conduct a series of pedestrian enforcements where officers in civilian 
clothing were used to walk in crosswalks together with a marked patrol officer unit to detect violators. 

Detective Division 

The Detective Division was comprised of Detective Sergeant Timothy Cassidy and Detectives 
Ted Delano, Jim Schultz and Rose Cheever. 

Detectives ensured that all officers receive the latest crime and officer safety information as well 
as regular updates of court decisions so that officers have the latest case law and law changes. 

Many crimes that occur in Swampscott involve multiple jurisdictions and require that Detectives 
maintain a relationship with Federal, State and other local law enforcement agencies. The Detectives 
were responsible for initiating or following up on investigations that ranged from annoying telephone calls, 
identity theft and credit card offences to, drug dealing, threats, serious assaults, sex offences, burglaries, 
and robberies. Detectives conducted several undercover drug investigations along with area police 
departments, the D.E.A. and the Essex County and North Shore Drug task force. Officers worked on a 
number of serious crimes including a gas station robbery in which DNA recovered from the suspects 
mask was used to identify him, several house breaks including one where a suspect was identified by 
DNA, and an extensive drug investigation involving the sale of marijuana and MDMA, a powerful form of 
ecstasy. 

Family Services Officer 

Detective Delano was assigned as the Family Services Officer. He reviewed 137 reported 
incidents of domestic disputes and monitored the status of active restraining orders involving individuals 
in Swampscott. He maintained contact with victims, followed the progress of domestic court cases and 
ensured that the members of the Police Department were informed of situations where victims may be at 
particular risk. 

In FY10 Detective Delano was appointed to the Area Board of the Massachusetts Department of 
Children and Families (DCF). Each Area Board is comprised of 23 members the cities and towns in the 
area where DCF is most active. The Board is recruited from diverse cultural and linguistic groups and 
represents varied experiences with DCF, e.g. foster/adoptive parents, youth, and birth parents with past 
DCF involvement, private providers, business leaders, schools, representatives from boards of other state 
agencies, union recommended candidates, experts in related fields: behavioral health, developmental 



185 



disabilities, domestic violence, substance abuse, child development, and other community leaders and 
partners. 

Board members duties and responsibilities may include advising the commissioner on the 
appointment of the area director, receiving a copy each year of the area office budget, reviewing the 
annual plan for the area office, acting as the representative of the citizens of the area, advising the area 
director of local needs and resources and reviewing contracts for programs and services. 

Motorcycle Unit 

The Department's Motorcycle unit includes Lieutenant Paul Bartram as the officer in charge, with 
Officers Michael Bowden, Sal Caruso and Brian Wilson as riders on two police Harley Davidson 
motorcycles. 

Training 



Media Relations training 

Three detectives were trained in media relations, which focused on teaching skills critical to 
managing events which garner intense television media attention. 

Emergency Medical Training 

During this period training was provided to officers in CPR, First Responder and AED (Automated 
External Defibrillator). Medical training allowed officers to maintain their mandated certification in each of 
these categories. As our Medical Officer, Lieutenant Jeanne Butler organized or conducted much of the 
training, served as liaison to the local ambulance service provider and is our state mandated Designated 
Infection Control Officer. She is also a member of the Metro Boston Critical Incident Stress Management 
team. 

Firearms and Use of Force Training 

Officers are equipped and trained with weapons that provide them with an array of options with 
respect to use of force. Under the direction of firearms instructors Officer John Dube and Detective Jim 
Schultz, officers attended two days of firearms and less lethal weapons training. Officers reviewed the 
Department Use of Force Policy as part of their training. 

In-Service Training 

Annual in-service training was conducted for the Department's officers at the Reading Police 
Academy. The Department conducted additional training "in house". Officers were recertified in the use of 
the station "Intoxilizer" breath alcohol analyzer unit and the four portable breath testers for use on the 
street. 

Online training courses 

We participated in a new program of "distance learning" implemented by the Massachusetts 
Police Training Committee that allows online training program for police officer where officers sign on and 
take certain courses and test on the subject during their shift. Records of the officer's participation and 
testing scores were recorded and maintained by the Captain. The MPTC program is at no cost to the 
Department. 



Individual Officer Recognition and Awards 

Officer Steven Luck and Officer Michael Serine were commended by the Chief of Police for their 
actions with respect to a medical aid in which a man had fallen off of a wall and sustained head and neck 
injuries. His neck was kept immobilized until he could be splinted and transported by ambulance 
personnel. It was later determined that he had suffered a fractured cervical vertebrae, the severity of 
which had the potential to result in paralysis for the patient 



186 



Sergeant Jonathan Locke and Officers Thomas Hennessey, Michael Serine and Michael Frayler 
were connmended by the Chief of Police for their response an incident in which a man had attacked and 
repeatedly stabbed a woman, critically wounding her before turning the knife on himself and inflicting 
severe knife wounds to both his wrists and to his throat. Officers rendered medical care to both the victim 
and her assailant, calmed and safeguarded witnesses and protected and preserved the crime scene for 
processing and follow-up investigation. Detective Sergeant Timothy Cassidy, Detective Delano and 
Detective Jim Schultz were commended for their response and investigation of this incident. 

Sergeant William Waters and Officer Candace Doyle were commended by the Chief of Police for 
their response to a man who was unconscious and not breathing due to an airway obstruction. The 
officers administered abdominal thrusts and were able to establish a partial airway. The patient survived 
this life threatening event. 



Department Statistics- FY 2010 



Some of the offenses reported during this period included: 

• 8 Robberies 

• 51 House or building break-ins 

• 84 Vehicle break-ins 

• 1 5 Motor vehicles stolen. 

• 7 Stolen vehicles recovered 

• 201 larceny related offences 

• 209 Domestic dispute incidents 

• 3 Reported rapes 

• 2 Indecent assault and batteries 

• 37 Drug offences 

• 43 Assaults and assault & batteries reported 

• 32 Incidents of identity theft 

• 1 Attempted murder 



Officers made 238 arrests in FY10. There were an additional 219 criminal complaints filed in which 
persons were summonsed to appear in court before a judge or to a hearing with a Clerk Magistrate. 
Summonsing is most often done as an alternative to arrest or as a result of a follow-up investigation. 



The Police Department responded to 428 motor vehicle accidents 



3,788 traffic charges were cited with a fine value of $55,120 . This value does not include fines resulting 
from criminal motor vehicle offenses. Violations included: 



808 Speeding offenses 

238 Drivers license offences. 

355 Vehicle registration offences 

1,180 Red light and stop sign offences 

47 Incidents of operating negligently or to endanger. 

40 Operating under the influence of liquor 

2 Operating under the influence of drugs. 



Officers issued 2.080 parking tickets with a total fine amount of $53.710 



• 724 All night parking 

• 586 Restricted place 

• 108 Overtime parking 

• 14 Wheels over 12 inches from curb 



187 



lb 1 


Wrong direction parking 


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Within 10 feet of hydrant 


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63 


Fire lane 


2 


Blocking private way/fire apparatus 


8 


Impeding snow removal 


61 


Handicapped parking 


173 


Other /Unknown offense 



Incident Type 


Total 




Incident Type 


Total 


91 1 Hang Up 


Z4b 




Medical Aid 


o32 


Accident Hit ii Kun MV 


no 




Missing Juvenile 






Accident Hit & Run MV w/injury 


1 




Missing Person 


9 


Accident Over !t10Q0 


113 




Motor Vehicle tatality 





Accident under $1000 


160 




Motor Vehicle Stop 


3155 


Accident with personal injury 


33 




Neighbor Dispute 


32 


Accidents/Pedestrian 


15 




Noisy Group Inside 


3 


Alarm 


903 




Noisy Group Outside 


A 

31 


Alcohol Overdose 


A 

1 




Notification 


57 


Animal Complaint 






Open and Gross Lewdness 





Annoying Phone Calls 


45 




Open Door/Window 


63 


Care Call checks 


43 




OUI Drugs 


2 


Assault 


16 




OUI Liquor 


40 


Assault & Battery 


27 




Park an Walk Patrol 


A A r\o 

1 ,193 


Assist Fire Department 


10 




Parking Complaint 


184 


Assist other Police Depts. 


107 




Parking Enforcement 


94 


Assist the elderly 


35 




Power Failure 


12 


Auemptea D&b 


4 




Protective Custody 


y 


Assault Attempt to Murder 


1 




Rape 


3 


B&E Motor Vehicle 


84 




Receiving Stolen Property 


4 


Bomb Threat 


2 




Recovered Property 


10 


Break & Entering 


47 




Recovered Stolen Vehicle 


7 


Building Check 


4,110 




Refuse to stop for police officer 


3 


By Law violation 


5 




Robbery 


8 


Checked area 


40 




Selective Enforcement 


32 


Child Abuse 


2 




Serve Court Papers 


122 


Civil Matter 


69 




Service Call 


233 


Complaint 


280 




Serving209-ARestraining order 


48 


Dangerous Weapon assault 


9 




Shoplifting 


49 


Disabled Motor Vehicle 


45 




Skate board/Rollerblade 


17 


Disturbance 


135 




Stolen License Plate 


6 


Domestic Dispute 


137 




Stolen Motor Vehicle 


15 



188 



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Fire 


Do 




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1 


roryery 


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1 1 


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44 


Ldrceriy 


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TQUin uisiuruance 


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41 


Liquor '^TTense 


A 




Youin unnKing inaoors 





1 /^oL*/^! it 

l_UL/l\UUL 


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1 4 




44 




Vol ith 1 oitQrin/"! 
TUUlll LUIlclllig 


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Lost Property 


38 




Youth Trespassing 


4 


Loud Music/Party 


94 




Youth Vandalism/Graffiti 


11 










Total Log Entries FY 10 Entries 
(Not all are listed) 


15,571 









Registered Sex Offenders 

At this writing there are two (2) registered Level 2 Sex Offenders living in Swampscott. There is also one 
(1) registered Level 2 Sex Offender working in Swampscott. There are two (2) registered Level 3 Sex 
Offenders living in Swampscott 

A Level 3 classification represents the most serious of offenders. Level 3 offender's photographs are 
posted in several public places including the Police Station, the Library and Town Hall. 

Internal Affairs 

Captain John Alex is assigned as the Department's Internal Affairs officer. The primary responsibility of 
the Internal Affairs function is to respond to allegations of misconduct against the police department and 
its employees. Captain Alex is responsible for recording, registering, and controlling the investigation of 
complaints against employees. Additionally the Police Department continuously inspects and reviews 
officer conduct internally. 

A relationship of trust and confidence between the employees of this police department and the citizens 
of the community is essential to the successful accomplishment of law enforcement objectives. We are 
committed to investigate all complaints against the department or a member of the department, 
regardless of the source of such complaints, through a regulated, fair, and impartial Internal Affairs 
Program. 

Citizens are encouraged to file a standard complaint report form, which is used to record all complaints of 
misconduct, mistreatment, or unethical practices against the police department. However, a verbal 



189 



complaint may be lodged as well. Citizens may make complaints in person at the station or by telephone 
or mail. All complaints will be investigated promptly. 

In some cases a complaint can be resolved to the complainant's satisfaction at the time by the shift 
supervisor or officer-in-charge of the station. Immediate resolution can often be accomplished if the 
incident is clearly not of a serious nature, or arises from a misunderstanding or lack of knowledge of the 
law or of the limitation of a police officer's authority 

Any Internal Affairs investigation must be commenced immediately upon receipt of the complaint and 
must be completed within thirty (30) days. Every person who has filed a complaint against an employee 
shall be notified of the results of the investigation. 

In fiscal year 2010 there were four (4) civilian complaints filed. All were investigated. Two complaints were 
ruled to be unsubstantiated a third was unfounded and the fourth was determined to be the result of a 
misunderstanding. 

Respectfully Submitted, 
Ronald J. Madigan 
Chief of Police 



190 



PLANNING BOARD REPORT 

The Planning Board held twelve meetings during the year from July 1 , 2008 through June 30, 
2009 to review and to provide approval action on various plans submitted to it under the Massachusetts 
Subdivision Control Law, and on site plans submitted to it in accordance with Swampscott Town By- 
Laws. Discussions were held with Swampscott residents, developers, contractors, architects and 
engineers regarding these matters to provide guidance and to assure compliance with Town By-Laws 
and regulations. The Planning Board also routinely consults with other town departments and officials, 
including the Inspector of Buildings, the Department of Public Works, the Fire Department and the Police 
Department, to ensure that proposed developments will ensure the safety and well being of Swampscott 
residents. 

This was the first full year that the new amended Zoning By-Law was in affect which was 
approved by Town Meeting Members in May 2009. In addition to other business which came before the 
Planning Board during the twelve meetings over the course of the year, the Board reviewed 11 
commercial submissions for signage and site plan, 14 residential site plan submissions, 1 site plan 
review for a proposed daycare, a subdivision review, a site plan review for a new proposed condominium 
development, and a paper street petition. 

Also during this year, long time Planning Board member Jeffery Blonder resigned in October 
as he was called for active duty as a member of the National Guard. Angela Ippolito was appointed 2 
months later as Mr. Blender's replacement and later was elected as a Planning Board member in April 
2009. In addition to the changes in personal of the Planning Board, the Town of Swampscott also lost its 
Town Planner, Danielle McKnight who resigned to take a position in Salem. Unfortunately the Town of 
Swampscott did seek to replace the position, something that was an unfortunate and the Planning Board 
feels that not filling the position is a huge loss for the Town. 

The Planning Board wishes to express its appreciation to other town boards and officials for 
their cooperation in helping to promote the town's interests and welfare. 

Respectfully submitted: 

Eugene Barden, Chairman 
John Phelan, Vice-Chairman 
Patrick Jones, Clerk 
Jeffery Blonder 
Bruce Paradise 
Angela Ippolito 



191 



SWAMPSCOTT PUBLIC LIBRARY 
FY 10 ANNUAL REPORT 



The library is completing another highly successful year. It is an effectively functioning facility 
with an abundance of valuable materials. The library is open a total of 41 hours per week which 
includes some mornings, afternoons, evenings and Saturdays. The three mornings per week that we 
are open are to accommodate our senior citizens and mothers with young children and the four 
evenings for our working patrons, we are also open from 10-2 on Saturdays, except during the summer 
months. The Swampscott Library is very fortunate to present to the townspeople a staff which includes 6 
librarians with MLS degrees and most other staff with a minimum of a B.S. degree. 

During Fy10 we circulated 163,445 items to our patrons. This was an increase over the previous 
year. We have more than 1 1 ,000 registered borrowers at the library. We had over 75,000 people come 
into the library during this year and over 4000 adults and children attending library programs. Many 
volunteers have donated more than 2,000 hours of help. 

The constant state of activity in the building gives evidence to our success. At almost any hour, 
every computer station is occupied, the tables in both the fiction and the browsing room are filled and 
the Children's room is alive with activity. Due to the downturn in the economy, libraries are extremely 
busy places. Townspeople have been coming to the library and availing themselves of many different 
technologies. We have more than 20 computers in the library for public use. Over the past year 
approximately 320 people per week access the Internet at the Swampscott Public Library. Many of 
these do so to check their e-mail, do Internet searches, search magazine databases and produce word 
processing documents. We have WI-FI available at the library, as well, for those patrons who bring their 
own laptops and wish to access the Internet from any corner of the building. Swampscott residents now 
can download audio books and e-books using their library card another valuable service that we are 
able to offer. 

The library has offered a variety of adult programs throughout the year. We hosted several book 
discussion groups, a Swampscott history discussion group and many informational workshops. This 
year we had guest speakers on Social Security, Identity Theft, Cures for Headaches and Long Term 
Care. This year our Chorover Author series, supported by a grant to the Friends of the Swampscott 
Library, presented Judith Nies, David Brody, Lois Lowry, Deahn Berrini and Marge Piercy. 

Our young adult librarian offered programs for teens. We held an art workshop for students in 
grades 6-12, programs for Teen Read week, and hosted the annual Lee Golomb Cadiff Teen Poetry 
Contest. 

The Children's department has continued with its high quality programming throughout the year. 
The children's librarians have continued to do outreach program to the schools holding library classes for 
any of the teachers interested in bringing their classes to the building. The librarians teach them about the 
library and about all of its resources. Many of our summer programs were full to capacity. 

Some lighting improvements were made to the main floor of the library which was funded by 
Capital Improvements. This was accomplished without having to inconvenience our patrons by closing. 

The library has continued to seek out grant monies and any additional available funding for 
projects and enhancements. We received a $13,000 LSTA grant from the Massachusetts Board of 
Library Commissioners to help us serve "Teens and Tweens" in the upcoming fiscal year. We received an 
ARTS lottery grant for a Children's program and hosted two Arts Lottery Art Workshops presented by 
Greg Maichack for adults. We also received the final grant from NMRLS (Northern Massachusetts 
Regional Library System) grant to purchase up to date travel books. 

The Friends of the Swampscott Public Library continue to be very supportive of library activities. 
They have purchased numerous museum passes for our patrons' use (Children's Museum, Science 
Museum, Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, John F. Kennedy Library, The Peabody/Essex Museum, the 
Museum of Fine Arts, The House of Seven Gables, Zoo New England, ICA, and the Harvard Museum of 
Natural History). The Friends also support summer children's programming, teen programming, pay for 



192 



the printing and postage of our newsletter, and help to defray the costs of refreshments for our adult 
programs. The library could never offer as many services and programs without the help of the Friends. 

In conclusion, it is because of the dedication of the staff, and the Board of Trustees and the Friends of 
the Library that the Swampscott Public Library can offer so many services and materials to the town. It is 
because of the support of the townspeople that the library is a success. 

BOARD OF LIBRARY TRUSTEES 
Jonathan Penyack, Chair 

John Karwowski, Vice Chair Marianne McDermott, Secretary. 

LIBRARY STAFF 
FULL TIME 

Alyce Deveau, Director 

Susan Conner, Assistant Director 

Sandra Moltz, Reference Librarian Maureen McCarthy, Head of Circulation 



PART TIME 



Elizabeth Coughlin, Children's Librarian 



Israella Abrams, Children's Librarian 



Marcia Harrison, Cataloguer 
Yelena Kuzmina, Tech Aide 



Ann Nechtem, Library Assistant 
Penny Longhurst, Library Assistant 
Joanne Janakas, Library Aide 
Maralyn Keay, Library Aide 
Cynthia Zeman, Library Aide 



Dorothy Forman, Administrative Assistant 



Marie Epstein, Library Aide 
Inna Kreychman, Library Aide 



OFFICERS OF THE FRIENDS OF THE SWAMPSCOTT LIBRARY 



Ellen Winkler, President 



Sidney Epstein, Treasurer 
Patricia Bradford, Clerk 



Vacant -Vice President 



Alison Kenney, Asst. Clerk 



Respectfully submitted, 
Alyce Deveau, Director 



193 



SWAMPSCOTT PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
Annual Report July 1, 2009 - June 30, 2010 
Lynne M. Celli, Ph.D., Superintendent of Schools 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



Neil Bernstein, Ph.D. 
Joseph Crimmins 
Jacqueline Kinney 

Glenn Paster 
Maureen Thomsen 



SCHOOL PRINCIPALS 



High School 
Middle School 
Clarke School 
Hadley School 
Stanley School 



Brian Salzer 
Ralph Watson 
Lois Longin 
Sandra Rivers 
Pamela Angelakis 



781 596-8830 
781 596-8820 
781 596-8812 
781 596-8847 
781 596-8837 



High School - Principal Brian Salzer and Assistant Principal Bryan Menegoni resigned in June 2010. 
Superintendent - Matthew Malone resigned effective July 31 , 2009. Maureen Bingham, Ed.D, Executive 
Director of Student Support Services, was named Interim Superintendent and served in that role until 
June 2010 when Lynne M. Celli was hired as Superintendent. 

April 2010 - Jaren Landen and Laurier Beaupre were elected to the School Committee replacing Neil 
Bernstein and Joseph Crimmins who did not seek re-election. 

NEW HIRES: 

Alison Argentieri - High School - ELA 

Alejandra Baralt - High School - Foreign Language 

Anne Beaulieu - High School - Inclusion Specialist 

Jaclyn Belson - Middle School - Long-term substitute Gr. 6 Math 

Heather Carr - Clarke - ESP 

Karen Clements - High School - Math 

Barbara Connors - Hadley - Extended Day Associate Teacher 
Rachel Eisenberg - Elementary - Art 

Santiago Gonzales Vasquez - High School - Foreign Language 

Nancy Grigorian - Elementary - Title I Tutor 

Nicole Jacobsen - Stanley - ABA Teacher 

Heidi Legere - Clarke - Grade 3 

Robert Myers - Middle School - Custodian 

Martha Limbocker - Middle School - Language-Based Teacher 

Joanna Maguire - Hadley - Grade 4 

Maria Messina - Elementary - ABA Tutor 

Laura New - High School - Permanent Substitute 

Jeffery Pierre - METCO - Support 

Nicole Piperidis - High School - Long-term substitute - Business 

Marcelo Rizzo - High School - CADS 

Courtney Russo - High School - ELA 

Sandi Santanello - Preschool - Permanent Substitute 

Ann Tarascio - Middle School - Math Intervention 

Christine Terry - High School - Foreign Language 

Kristin Wall - Extended Day - ESP 

Joanne Wheeler - Clarke - Kindergarten 

Emily Zotto - High School - Guidance 



194 



RESIGNATIONS: 

Christine Dzedulionis - SPED Teacher 

Katharine Jordanoff - Clarke - Grade 3 

Anne Kleschinsky - Preschool - ESP 

Elizabeth Legere - High School - Foreign Language 

Katrina Mailman - Stanley & Middle School - Music 

Kristen Villanueva - Stanley - Intermediate Discovery Center 

Jean Whelan - Clarke - ESP 

RETIREMENTS: 

Susan Abelson - Stanley - Guidance 

Biagio Crescenzo - Middle School - Custodian 

Joanna Defeo - High School - ELA 

Susan Kaplan - Stanley - Reading Specialist 

Patricia Nagle- Stanley - Grade 1 

Jennifer Palardy - Hadley - Grade 4 

Linda Portnoy - High School - Business 

William Ryan - Middle School - Science 

DEATH 

Maureen Ingram - Stanley - Grade 1 

CLARKE SCHOOL 

Enrollment: 228 

Clarke School opened for grades 1-4 on September 1, 2009, with 173 students enrolled in eight 
classrooms. Kindergarten began on September 8, 2009, with 55 students enrolled in three classrooms 
making the total enrollment 228 students. 

Within the course of the year, seven students enrolled and nine students moved out of the 
building. Of the nine students who moved, one stayed in the district and the other eight moved to other 
states. 

School Theme 

Clarke School staff and students continued with the process of becoming one cohesive and 
unified entity -D.O.R.Y. Nation. Daily, we conducted school wide announcements where as a community 
we shared in each other's birthdays, special events, "Code of Conduct", and in unison remembered the 
school motto of the D. (determination) O. (organization) R. (responsibility) Y. (you make a difference) by 
chanting "All hands on board DORY NATION!" 

We met monthly as an all school community and we designed our meetings after the Responsive 
Classroom model. We started with the "Clarke School Greeting", where each grade level greeted one 
another. The theme of each meeting was based again on Clarke's "Code of Conduct" - honesty, 
politeness, respect, responsibility, cooperation, etc. We concluded each meeting with our Clarke School 
song "One Big Happy Family". 

The Clarke School faculty remains deeply invested in helping our students reach their highest 
potential by becoming outstanding citizens, and giving back to our community in a positive manner. 
EVENTS IN 2009-2010 

September: PTA Kindergarten Parents' Breakfast, Curriculum Night, Safe Routes, Social Cognitive 
testing lab - Yale. 

October: Social Cognition Lab- Yale, International Walk to School Day, Community Meeting-K- 
Cooperation, Food Drive, Halloween Parade, Legere Lane Dedication. 

November: Eat Like a Rainbow, Community Meeting - Gr. 4 - Honesty, Book Fair, Bring Your Family 
Back to School Night, Cultural Arts-Dan Cripps-Native American. 
December: PJ Day, Social Cognitive testing lab - Yale, Holiday Fair. 

January: Community Meeting-Respect for Individual Differences, Geography Bee, Red, White and Blue 
Day (write letters to soldiers overseas). Community Service-Collect DVD's for JRC, Change for the 
Children of Haiti, Spelling Bee. 

February - Domino Guy-Peter Bloom, Day 100, Visit by Staff Sergeant Patrick Burke, Community 
meeting-Grade 3-Opening Day Ceremony-Olympics. 



195 



March: Wellness Day, Grades 3 & 4 PTA-sponsored symphony trip, Crystal Journey Puppet - K&1, Art 
Quest, Comnnunity Meeting-Gr. 2-Respect, Ken Carrier-Shared Science, Senior Center Partnership-gr. 4 
Book Group, Parent Coffee, Baseball Team Spirit Day. 

April: Art Quest, Community Meeting-Gr. 1 -Responsibility, Giles LaRoche-Artist in Residence-Illustrator, 
crazy Style Day, Ed the Wizard-Cultural Arts. 

May: New England Conservatory Concert, 4'^ grade Movie Night, Save the Earth Day, Operation 
Lifesaver, County Fair/Cow Plop, Walk to Mrs. Pringle's house - 100 year old former Clarke teacher. 
June: Wacky Olympics, Spring Chorus, K Visitation, Gr. 4 Museum of Science Field Trip, Gr. 2 Walk to 
Library, Senior Citizens and Gr. 4 Landmarks presentation, Gr. 4 Franklin Park Zoo, Leaders Club 
breakfast. Volunteer Appreciation Event, Science Fair, Butterfly Place Field Trip, Spring Arts Festival, 
Clarke School Field Day, Final Gr. 4 Moving Up Ceremony. 

PTA Activities: Halloween Hoot, gift wrap. Book Fair, Holiday Fair, After School Program, Lego, Spanish 
book clubs. Community Day, Cow Plop, Box Tops, Teacher Wish List, Pizza/Movie Night, Teacher 
Appreciation Luncheon, School-wide field trip to symphony. 

Cultural Arts: Historical Perspectives-Ben Franklin and Abe Lincoln, Native American-Dan Cripps Art 
Quest, Shared Science-owl pellets, heart beats, eyes and vision, Artist in Residence-Giles LaRoche- 
Poetry Night, Domino Guy. 
HADLEY SCHOOL 

The Hadley Elementary School opened in September 2009 with 255 students. Our enrollment as 
of this report is 260 students including our 12 METCO students. This year, as a result of our full day 
kindergarten programs, we welcomed two METCOC students into kindergarten. 
Faculty Charity 

When a staff member chooses to wear jeans to work, we have agreed to pay $1 .00. This pool of 
money is one source for our staff to make charitable contributions. This year the staff (in conjunction with 
the Hadley Community) made a sizeable donation to the American Red Cross for the Haitian earthquake 
victims. 

Continental Math League - Grades 2-4 

This is an extracurricular activity manned by parent volunteers who act as coaches to encourage 
students to problem solve in mathematics. The league meets one morning a week from 7:45 a.m. to 8:15 
a.m. 

Hadley Herald 

This is an extracurricular activity to create a school newspaper with parent volunteers as 
facilitators and editors. 
Student Leaders' Club 

This activity was opened to all 4"^ grade students as an opportunity to enhance school culture, 
develop leadership qualities, and contribute to charitable endeavors. Spirit Day themes - Pajama Day, 
Crazy Hair Day, Mix-lt-Up Day, Beach Day. 
Conversation and Cookies 

The principal and school adjustment counselor conducted weekly small group lunches (four at a 
time on a rotating basis) giving students a forum to discuss issues of importance to them. 
Student Activities/Programs 

Curriculum Night, Open House and Book Fair, Grade 4 Bullying Program, Fall and Spring 
Pictures, Halloween Parade, Spelling Bees in grade 4 and grade 1, METCO Potluck, Kindergarten Colors 
Program, Reading Buddies, Field Trips to Smolak Farms, Aquarium, Swan Boats and Beacon Hill, Boston 
Symphony, Harvard Museum of Natural History, Peabody Essex Museum, Music Department concerts - 
chorus and band, D.E.A.R. (Drop Everything and Read), Wellness Day, Jump-in-Tolerance Jump-a- 
thon/Respect for Human Difference, RHD Walk-a-thon, Grade 4 Middle School Orientation, Grade 4 Field 
Day (all schools), Hadley Field Day, Memorial Day Program with invited guests. Kindergarten Tea, 
Classroom Performances, Intergenerational interviews. Title I Parent Night, 4'^ Grade chorus 
performance at JCC, Daddy Drop-Off Day. Trips to the Public Library, Grade One donation to Northeast 
Animal Shelter, Grade Two Scavenger Hunt, Principal's Incentives for Study Island, Grade One Pet 
Parade, Grade Four Boston Duck Tour, Science Lunch Bunch, Beach (Science) Trips by Grade Level, 
Volunteer Appreciation Breakfast. 

STANLEY SCHOOL 



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Stanley School opened for Grades 1 thru 4 on September 1, 2009, with 242 students enrolled in 
13 classrooms. Fourteen (14) of those students were enrolled through the METCO Program. 
Kindergarten started school on September 8'^ with 60 students enrolled in 3 classrooms making the total 
enrollment at the start of school 305 students. During the course of the school year, eight additional 
students enrolled between 9/8/09 and 3/15/10 and six students moved out of district between 12/23/09 
and 3/5/10. Total enrollment at the close of school on June 21 , 2010 was 304 students. 
School Theme 

Learning and Caring Count at Stanley continues to be our theme. Students continued to commit 
random acts of kindness and receive P.R.O. Awards (People Respecting Others). Many other organized 
community service activities were planned for student participation and fundraising. This year, 41tudents 
in Grades K-4 participated in the St. Jude Hospital Math-a-Thon and they raised $2,486.20. Each student 
completed a Math Fun Book, CD or completed their math problems online with grade level appropriate 
problems and collected pledges from sponsors. 

Grade 4 Leaders. They continue to be role models who demonstrate leadership and service 
while developing persona attributes. Leaders assume various responsibilities over the course of the year. 
Leaders ran a very successful Recycling Program. They pride themselves on collecting money for TLC, 
meet weekly with the principal to work on developing leadership skills, responsible behavior and 
exemplify belief that Taking One Small Action Can Make a Difference. 

Leaders raised $475 plus several boxes of gifts were donated for TLC. Leaders raised $370 with 
their Open House Bake Sale to purchase gift certificates for the Swampscott Senior Center Holiday Party. 
They raised $500 for the American Red Cross Haitian Relief Fund during Hat Day. They also raised $300 
on Pajama Day and the VFW matched this amount so with a total of $600 we will purchase supplies for 
the troops and the VFW will mail them overseas. Students raised $78 for American Red Cross Chile 
Relief Fund with a Change for Chile donation jar. Students also did a Unicef Halloween Trick or Treat 
Collection and raised $628.48. 
PROGRAMS: 

SPIRIT - Stanley Parents Inspire Reinforce Teach 

This program was started to organize parent volunteers for various activities. Volunteers can get 
involved in our school by either running before school programs, assisting in the library, assisting with 
clerical tasks in the office, etc. The SPIRIT squad has been an enhancement to our school community. 
Continental Math League - Grades 2-4 

Meets one morning a week from 7:45 a.m. - 8:15 a.m. with parent volunteers and teachers as 
coaches. 

Student Programs and Activities 

September Stride for Good Health Walk, Monthly Writing Samples to Principal - Gr. K-4, 
Curriculum Night, Fall and Spring Student Pictures, Mass. Walk to School Day, Open House and Book 
Fair, Grade 4 Leaders visit with senior citizens. Grade 4 Peer Proof Program w/Camp Fire, African History 
Month Celebration with Mrs. Bush, Ms. Mailman & Mrs. Pacitto, Kindergarten Halloween Parade, 
Geography Bee, Spelling Bee, 100'^ Day Food Drive for Local Food Pantry by Grades 1 and 3, Dental 
Program for Kindergarten, Grade 3 Biographies, Grade K & 1 Science Fair, Book Swap, School Mock 
Lock Down Drill, MASS Walk to School Day, Gr. 4 Mexican Celebration, Gr. 1 Portfolio Sharing for 
Parents, Gr. 4 visits from Detective Cheever, Gr. 4 Puberty videos. Field trips to Russell Farms, 
Stoneham Theatre, Jordan's IMAX Theatre, Mass General Hospital Health Fair, Fisherman's Beach and 
Salem Orientation Center, Music Department concerts-chorus. Music Department Vertical Concert with 
Middle and High School, P.E. Fitness Programs (Gr. 4 one-mile run, September Stride, Trekking 
Tuesdays, Halloween Heart Walk, Turkey Trot, Tae Kwon Do, Yoga, Hip Hop & Fitness Walks), Kite 
Program, Gr. 4 Red Sox Day, Safe Routes to School Pedestrian Safety Training with Grade 2, Gr. 4 
Cemetery Walk, Various Authors' Teas, Gr. 3 Historical Society, Gr. 4 Canadian Celebration, METCO 
Roller Skating, Jump-in-Tolerance Jump-a-thon/Respect for Human Differences, Gr. 3 Photography 
exhibit, Math-N-Munchkin Math Team Celebration, Recognition Ceremony and Volunteer Appreciation, 
Grade K-3 Move Up Day, Gr. 4 Moving Up Ceremony. 
PTA Activities 

PTA All School Coffee, Popsicles in the Park for Kindergarten, Popsicles in the Park 
Kindergarten, Welcome Coffee for Kindergarten, Stanley UNO's Fundraiser Night, Internal & External 
Beautification Program, Highly successful After School Enrichment Programs, Book Fair, Holiday Fair, 



197 



Movie Nights, Evening of Poetry, Teacher Appreciation Staff Luncheon, Fitness Walk, Mass Routes Walk 
to School Day, Annual Fun-n-Field Day, Safe Routes and Gr. 2 Pedestrian Training. 
Cultural Arts/Enrichment Programs 

Perry Pomeroy-Art Quest-Art History and Appreciation Gr. K-4, Historical Perspectives - Helen 
Keller - Gr. K-4, Historic New England-Gr. 1, Young Audiences-The Promised Land: Immigrant 
Experience thru Music, Domino Day and Evening Program, Poet in Residence-Julia Thacker, Jill Stover- 
Author Gr. 1, Poet In Residence-Grs. 3 & 4-Julia Thacker, Tae Kwon Do, Yoga, Hip Hop, Gr. 2 Marine 
Science Center, Kids to Kites Programs, Boston Children's Chorus Performance, Spring Arts Festival, 
Dan Kripps-Native American Perspectives. 

MIDDLE SCHOOL 

Swampscott Middle School continues to work on building a strong learning and respectful 
community. 

Highlights of the 2009-2010 school year: 

• Participation in the M.l.T. Sea Perch Program - all grade seven students took part in this program 
which included building underwater vessels to complete assigned experiments in a competition 
which took place at M.l.T. in the spring. 

• Professional training for all middle school teachers in Keys to Literacy, a program that provides 
uniformed language and skills to improve student literacy skills. 

• Third Annual Day of Respect-a full day program where students and faculty work on issues of 
respect and anti-bullying. 

• Several all school assemblies including Rachel's Challenge and Ryan's Tory, to address the area 
of bullying and respectful communities. 

• Grade 5-8 Core Standards identified and posted on the school web site. 

• Increase development of STEM program with focus on math and science curriculum and real life 
skills. 

• Night of Excellence - a night in May that showcases student work at the Middle School-open to 
the entire community. 

• Grade 8 trip to Washington, D.C. 

• Grade 6 trip to Ferry Beach Environmental Camp in Saco, Maine. 

HIGH SCHOOL 
Academic Highlights 
NEASC Visit and Evaluation: 

• Prepared and voted for approval on all sections of self-study report. Report is being bound and 
copies prepared for Superintendent and School Committee. 

• Developed and implemented Common Assessments. Currently common assessments are 
developed and utilized by our core academic courses. 80% of exams (mid year and finals) are 
common among courses in Science and Math. 

EXPANDED CURRICULUIVI 

• Over 30 new courses were developed, approved, and added to our Program of Studies last 
December. Next year, 17 courses are scheduled to run for their first year. 

• Used Gelfand grant to support STEM based courses and Practical Arts; specifically physics club, 
robotics, and an elementary partnership with the high school in marine biology. 

• Added a new fitness (P.E.) elective. 

• Continued to develop and support Senior Project and Junior Job shadowing project under 
direction of Lynn Area Chamber of Commerce. 

• Expanded Naviance System Access for students and parents. 
SOCIAL/CIVIC HIGHLIGHTS 

PROMOTE SOCIAL/EMOTIONAL WELLNESS: 

• Continued to develop and support Mix It Up Day, Wellness Day, Step Up Day, Advisory (X Block) 
activities. 

• Continued to develop and support initiatives of the Drug/Alcohol Abuse Prevention Task Force. 

• Continued to develop and support Leadership Symposium. 

• Continued to develop and support MVP, Peer Mentors and Best Buddies programs. 



198 



• Continue to develop and support Annual Alumni Positive Role Models Panel. 

• Continued to develop and support Lynn Chamber of Commerce Job Shadowing/Mentoring. 

• Continued to support 9"" grade transitions: Mentoring Program, developed new program for 9"^ 
grade students at-risk of academic failure and changed Step-Up Day activities. 

GLOBAL EDUCATION 

• Created cross-curricular global lessons, courses, and experiences. 

• Continued to develop and support enrichment activities: Chinese Culture Day, Mix It Up Day, 
international music performances, and art displays in the lobby. 

• Continued to develop and support international travel, hosting, and learning programs. 

• Developed and presented our first Global Competency Award certificates. 
COMMUNICATION/TECHNOLOGY 

• Implemented on-line comments, grades in place of paper, and encouraged development of 
teacher websites. 

• Sent twice monthly newsletter "The Principal's Perspective" to all parents and faculty 
electronically (and posted on website). 

• Continued to develop and utilize the Language Lab to its capacity including sending faculty to 
training workshop. 

• Continue to integrate Smartboard technology into the curriculum in two science classrooms. Also 
wrote and received a grant to add Smartboards to all math classrooms next year. 

STUDENT SERVICES DEPARTMENT 

During the 2009-2010 school year, Dr. Maureen Bingham served as Interim Superintendent and 
Mona Blumstein served as Interim Director of Student Services. In June 2010, Dr. Bingham returned as 
Assistant Superintendent/Director for Student and Instructional Services and Mrs. Blumstein returned to 
her position as Team Chair for grades preK-6. 
NEW PROGRAMS 

Ms. Nicole Jacobsen was hired to be the special educator for a kindergarten team teaching 
inclusion program for students on the autism spectrum who could be successfully mainstreamed. The 
program has been expanded in the 2010-2011 school year to include kindergarten and first grade 
classrooms with the additional support of an ESP. 
EXISTING PROGRAMS 

Programs at the Integrated Pre-School remained the same. The elementary schools each 
continued with Resource Room Programs. The Language Based Learning Programs continued at the 
Clarke School with both primary and intermediate levels. At Stanley School, the Primary and 
Intermediate Discovery Program became one program for the 2009-2010 school year serving students in 
grades K-4 with Pervasive Developmental Delays or Autism Spectrum Disorder. The Middle School 
maintained two Language Based Learning Programs as well as Inclusion/Resource Room Programs. 
The Secondary Inclusion Specialist continued to provide social skills training to students with 
Developmental, Autism Spectrum and Emotional Disabilities and to consult to classroom teachers on 
appropriate interventions and strategies for working with this population effectively. The High School 
maintained Task Management Classes at all four grade levels, a Language Based Learning Class and 
both the Life Skills and IVY (post grad) programs. 

During the 2009-2010 school year, the district went through the process of developing, submitting 
and receiving approval for the Corrective Action Plan required by DESE as part of the Coordinated 
Program Review that was conducted in May 2008. 

I 



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DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 



The Town received approximately 50-inches of snow (six inches above the annual 
average), which not only taxed the Department of Public Works employees, but the budget as 
well. There were no fewer than eleven sanding/salting operations which in itself exhausted the 
entire snow removal budget. Fortunately for the Town, there were only three significant snow falls 
that required the Town to contract independent plow operators to assist in the snow removal 
operations; the largest one being on December 20 when the Town was blanketed with close to 
one foot of snow. The fifteen-man DPW work force should be commended for their dedication to 
assuring that the Town streets were as safe as humanly possible. Once again, a job well done! 

On July 1, Mr. Charles Picariello retired from his position with the Department of Public 
Works after 33 years of service. Remarkably during his 33 years with the Town, Mr. Picariello 
never called out sick. The Director of Public Works would like to thank Mr. Picariello for his many 
years of dedicated service to the Town of Swampscott. Additionally, a second employee left the 
Department in May which reduced the total number of DPW employees' to fourteen; before two 
new employees were hired on October 6. The labor force, as it currently stands, continues to 
serve the Town well with its limited manpower. To supplement the limited work force the 
Department contracts out landscaping services for Town owned parks and other public areas, 
Leahy Landscaping has been adeptly maintaining the Town's landscaping needs for the ninth 
consecutive year, however their contract with the Town is set to expire in November and a new 
three year contract will be awarded to the lowest responsible bidder in March of 2011. The 
Department continues to work cooperatively with other Boards, Committees, Commissions, Town 
Departments and residents, and would like to thank them for all their shared cooperation during 
the past year. 

For the nineteenth year, the Department was a recipient of the "Tree City USA" award. 
Through general funding, and the donations of several generous residents, the Department was 
able to plant twenty-eight trees at various locations around the Town, and is committed to 
planting more trees in the coming years, as well as, maintaining our existing trees. Unfortunately, 
the Department took down, or had come down, twenty-seven trees due to them either being 
diseased or dead. The Department also conducted two Tree Hearings during the course of the 
year. Each hearing provided residents with the opportunity to speak for, or against, the removal of 
potentially hazardous trees throughout the Town. The Department continues to utilize its 55-foot 
aerial bucket truck. The bucket truck was funded through the support of the Capital Improvement 
Committee, and allows for the Department to promptly remove and prune trees that may be 
presenting a danger to the community, as well as conducting this work at a significant savings to 
the tax payers of the Town of Swampscott. The bucket truck has also been instrumental in 
providing assistance to the School and Police Departments. 

After close to a decade in delays, the Department of Public Works oversaw the 
completion of the removal of contaminated soils at the Water Tower site on Plymouth Lane. Also 
as part of this quarter of a million dollar project, the Town installed a massive retaining wall on the 
property to provide for future storage on the site. The contractor. Northeast Tank & Environmental 
Services, Inc, should be commended for their excellent work on the project. The quarterly 
water/sewer billing cycle has continued to result in additional revenue to the Town. The Water 
Division was quite busy over the course of the year, repairing eleven water main breaks. The 
largest and most costly break occurred on April 15, and was on the 12-inch main on at 500 
Paradise Road. The repair required the assistance of N. Granese & Sons, and due to the fact that 
the water main ran directly through to 30-inch drain lines, took four days to repair. Additionally, an 
abnormally high twenty-two service leaks, as well as four hydrants, were repaired in-house by a 
select few members of the work force. The Water Division continues to be responsible for bi- 
monthly water samples that ensure that the water quality is safe for consumption for the residents 
of the Town of Swampscott. The Town also undergoes semi-annual testing for both lead and 
copper, which is also monitored by the MWRA. This past year, as in previous years, tests have 
consistently shown no indications of any health hazards associated with the Town's potable water 
supply. The Water Division was also responsible for the winterization of the 450 plus hydrants in 
Town, as well as the removal and replacement of 250 seasonal irrigation meters. 



200 



The Sewer Division with the assistance of outside contractors re-built ten catch basins 
and two sewer manholes. They cleaned approximately 75 storm drains (down from 250 the 
previous year), and repaired a combined eight drain and sewer and main breaks. The Sewer 
Division was responsible for the freeing up of numerous sewer blockages throughout the year. 
Most of these blockages occurred outside the regular work day which results in many hours of 
overtime for the already shorthanded crew. The Department also issued 65 street opening 
permits to private contractors resulting in $65,000.00 of additional revenue to the Town. The 
Department continues to function successfully under an enterprise fund system for both sewer 
and water. Unfortunately, for the second consecutive year, both the sewer and water rates 
needed to be increased to help offset increasing expenses. The future goal of the Department 
remains to be able to fund capital projects through surplus funds, while keeping the rates at an 
equitable figure. 

With the use of Chapter 90 aid from the Massachusetts Highway Department and an 
additional $150,000 of funding provided by the Town through its Capital Improvement Committee, 
the Department of Public Works was able to pave the following roadways: Orchard Road, Sculpin 
Way, Windsor Ave (from Foster Road to Sampson Ave), Puritan Road (from Humphrey Street to 
Lincoln House Point), Kings Beach Terrace, Blaney Street, Blaney Circle, Thorndike Terrace, 
Greenwood Ave (from Forest Ave to Rockland Ave), Reid Terrace, and Essex Street (from 
Stetson Ave to the Salem line). It should be noted that Essex Street was paved as part of a joint 
venture with the City of Salem, and it is hoped that future paving projects will be bid under the 
same conditions. Both paving projects were completed by D&R Paving, and the Town was quite 
pleased with their work and attentiveness to detail. Additionally, approximately 7,000 square feet 
of asphalt sidewalk were replaced town wide by an outside contractor (Dunn Landscaping), and 
we are committed to continuing this yearly project to help provide safer conditions for pedestrians 
using the sidewalks in Swampscott. The Highway Division continues to maintain our parks and 
beaches, and is responsible for: street line painting, street sweeping, and litter control. The street 
sweeper was busy keeping the Town roads clean, being out for two weeks during the autumn 
months and two weeks during the spring. The Highway Division was also responsible for the 
placing over 100 ton of asphalt, both hot and cold mix, in the hundreds of potholes that developed 
over the winter months. In-house paving became a staple of the Highway Division this past year 
with over 300 ton of asphalt roadways being replaced by members of the DPW staff. Further, 
with the financial assistance of the Town's Recreation Department, the Parks Division was 
instrumental in the rehabilitation of the soccer field at Upper Jackson Park. The Swampscott High 
School baseball diamond was also totally rehabbed after several years of neglect. This project 
could not have been completed without the generous support of resources and equipment 
donated by Meninno Construction. The Parks Division also devoted over 500 man hours to 
marking athletic fields for school sanctioned events, and planted over 900 flowers on the 
Swampscott Monument. 

The Cemetery Division was responsible for forty-one interments and thirty-one 
cremations, as well as, the overall maintenance of over thirty acres of landscape. Additionally, the 
Cemetery Division planted close to 2500 flowers as part of the Swampscott Cemetery's perpetual 
care. This past year, the Cemetery Division continued with its commitment to repairing 
headstones that have settled and were in need of repair. Thanks to a huge financial commitment 
from the Town, $100,000 of emergency repairs was made to the Andrews Chapel. Due to the 
stones becoming dislodged from the structure's tower, the building presented a hazard to visitors 
of the section of the cemetery. It is the DPW Director's hope that during the next fiscal year 
additional funding will be secured to complete the final restoration to the exterior of the building. 

The Department is quite proud of the fact that they were able to complete several 
significant in-house projects that were accomplished at a substantial savings to the Town. The list 
of projects includes: the installation of granite curbing at the intersection 10 Little's Point Road, 
the ongoing repairs to the floats at Fisherman's Beach, and the continuing replacement of the 
street signs that now meet State specifications. 

The Department was also instrumental in overseeing the completion of several 
noteworthy projects during the past year. The most significant being the reconstruction of the boat 
ramp at Fisherman's Beach. The ramp was designed by a local engineer and was constructed by 
Unified Contracting at a cost of just under $100,000. Secondly was the installation of two new 



201 



traffic signals at number 60 and 225 Humphrey Street. Ttiis project was a joint venture between 
tiie Department of Public Works and Tri-State Signal, and was completed with considerable 
savings to the Town. Thirdly the altitude valve at 3 New Ocean Street that controls the elevation 
of the Water Tower was rebuilt by the Ross Valve Company with the assistance of the MWRA. 
This project became necessary after several weeks of the Water Tower overflowing and flooding 
out abutters to the site. Two other overdue projects completed were the masonry repairs to the 
stone retaining wall at Lynscott Park and the replacement of the chain link fence abutting the 
north most side of Phillips Park. 

The Engineering Department was instrumental in overseeing the continued videoing and 
repair of close to three miles of sewer and drain lines. This ongoing project is part of Department 
of Environmental Protection consent order intended to remove illicit connections from the Town's 
drainage infrastructure, and will carry on into the next decade. The Engineering Department also 
oversaw the testing of 176 back flow devices that was again mandated by the Department of 
Environmental Protection. 

Finally, I would be remiss if I did not thank the office staff, which continues to provide 
ongoing dedication and services to the residents of the Town of Swampscott. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Gino A. Cresta Jr. 
Director of Public Works 



202 



RECREATION DEPARTMENT 



MISSION STATEMENT 



The Recreation Department provides the community with leisure time activities for adults and children. 
This includes beaches and lifeguards, sailing lessons, tennis, track and field, basketball, soccer, 
playground programs and a teen recreation center. In winter months we offer enrichment programs for 
both adults and children. We also provide beach and railroad stickers and collect field usage fees. 



The Recreation Department continues to work closely with the schools, youth sports groups and the 
DPW to create a field utilization schedule and a Field use and maintenance program so that we may 
continue to use and maintain our new sports fields properly. 

Our Sailing Program continues to grow. We meet monthly with the Friends of Swampscott Sailing which 
is a non-profit organization that promotes sailing in our community. We continue to work with the 
school to develop the first High School racing team. Safety as well as developing life long sailors 
continues as our main goal for this program. 

Breakfast with Santa in December continues to be a very popular program. 

Our Adult winter Programs include Open Weight Room and Men's Over Forty Basketball and Cardio 
Tennis. 

In the winter months we have Girl's Travel Basketball, Indoor Soccer, Track, Youth Basketball , Skiing, 
Indoor Tennis , Basketball Clinic and Vacation Camps. 

The Recreation Department looks forward to adding new programs with input from the community each 
year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Danielle StraussRecreation Director 

RECREATION COMMISSION 

Jennifer Nesbit Mary Webster Tina McKay Glenn Kessler 



203 



ANNUAL REPORT 
SWAMPSCOTT SENIOR CENTER 
July 2009 -June 2010 

The Swampscott Senior Center has continued to provide services 
and social opportunities for the senior citizens in our community. Our 
data collection indicates that 1139 seniors have utilized our services 
this year. Our programs include: a variety of exercise programs, art, 
bridge, mahjongg, poker club, canasta, cribbage club, men's club, 
knitting, dance, beano, walking groups, bowling, golf, theater trips, 
lunch trips, arts and craft projects, singing and many special events 
each month. 

The Senior Center is open from 8:30 to 3:00 Monday, Tuesday and 
Thursday. We have a delayed opening at 10:30am on Wednesday and 
Friday due to budget cuts during this fiscal year. In addition, the 
Center opens two evenings for cribbage and contract bridge as part of 
the weekly schedule. As a town facility, we often open our space to 
town committees or boards for their evening meetings. This year we 
have participated in several intergenerational programs. Our major 
endeavor was with the Clarke School. A dozen of our senior citizens 
worked with fourth grade student leaders on three projects. The food 
pantry drive, the book club discussions, and a spring clean up and 
beautification project of the school grounds. We continued outreach 
work on several projects in the high school. The oral history project 
with the American Studies Project was a tremendous success. Several 
of our octogenarians had many stories to tell. Our primary contribution 
was to establish a library corps volunteer group to help keep the library 
open. In addition, the seniors utilize the dance studio, the gymnasium 
and the computer labs for various activities. Students came to chat, and 
to perform. The program possibilities are extensive. The staff tries to 
listen and respond to as many ideas as we can. Those who come to 
play Beano on Tuesday and Friday are many of our older seniors who 
depend on our van for transportation to both the Senior Center and to 
do their shopping and errands.. 

Staffing at the Senior Center has changed during this year. The 
position of volunteer coordinator was eliminated to enable us to keep a 
much needed administrative assistant. We also added a data clerk to 
help maintain accurate records of enrolled members and their level of 
participation in our programs so that we can determine what is 
successful and what needs to be reconsidered. Our directors share 
responsibility for the center and each work three days or eighteen hours 
per week. Budget constraints have resulted in cutting hours for all staff 
members. 

Our meals provided by GLSS are nutritious and delicious. The cost 
of $2.00 is appealing to many who are living with limited incomes. 
Our lunch bunch has expanded to approximately thirty to forty each 
day. GLSS has added a feature of a special meal each month often the 
chef arrives with the food and discusses both preparation and nutrition. 
We also have special event luncheons for holidays and other occasions. 
For example, The Abbott House will provide a discussion on healthy 
eating followed by a luncheon. They also invite us armually to lunch at 
their facility followed by a bingo game with prizes and other freebies. 
Monthly we sponsor a mystery lunch with the support of an 
Enrichment Grant; we take our seniors out to lunch. These can be 



204 



hilarious affairs. Our van travels to Vinnin Square and The Tri City 
shopping area four days per week. Our van drivers assist the shoppers 
with their bundles and have the patience of saints. 

Another mandate for our Senior Center is to provide our seniors with 
information about health insurance, prescription programs, and 
information on health and welfare in your senior years in general. 
Guest speakers are scheduled. We have regularly scheduled podiatrist 
services, hearing tests, and legal consul. We assist with running the 'flu 
shot clinic'. We provide blood pressure screening twice weekly. The 
Swampscott Senior Center Men's Club is well attended. Each month 
they meet for a special luncheon and guest speaker. The men also 
bowl, play golf, and cribbage. Two annual events are planned with 
care, the Holiday gathering and the Men's plus wife luncheon at the 
Porthole to kick of the year. Warren Hopkins, our outreach worker, is 
the resource for our Men's Club. 

There have been many special events this past year. They range 
from our annual events including a holiday party for both the men's 
club and the general population. We sponsored a Patriot Day event 
with songs and history as well as a special lunch. Our popularity is 
such that we must now limit our special events to eighty five to ninety 
people by selling tickets in advance. The Senior Center is warm and 
welcoming. Everyone is greeted and our seniors now share a sense of 
community. They care for each other and are grateful for the 
socialization and friendships that have been the result of coming to The 
Swampscott Senior Center. 

Overall this has been a very successfiil year. Thank you to the staff, 
our Friends Group and our Board for all the help. We believe that we 
have fiilfilled our mission goals for Swampscott's Senior Citizens. 



205 



Technology Department 



The largest change in the Technology Department In FY2010 was the addition of a 
community notification system. The Town brought in Blackboard Connect to provide Town 
Officials with a medium to reach all of or portions of the Town with important information 
regarding weather emergencies, community events, road work, and water pipe work. During 
FY2010, the Town placed 11 phone calls, emails, and text messages to residents which 
collectively sent out 51 ,388 notifications. 

Also in FY2010, the Town's MUNIS financial server was updated. New and improved 
software and hardware replaced the older, non-supported versions we were maintaining. In 
addition to the server, we brought in Crystal Reports to work with MUNIS to customize the reports 
that we are able to run. 

This year, 5 pc's were replaced in Town Hall, as was a printer at the Library. I continue 
to work with the Police Department, Fire Department, Town Hall Departments, and Library with 
regards to any technology issues that may arise. The migration of users to Office 2007 from 
Office 2003 continued. Currently about half of the PC's on the town-side have been upgraded. 
The Technology Department worked with the Police Department to bring in an electronic finger 
printing system, which provided faster and more efficient processing. 

In Fiscal Year 2010, the Technology Department also had audio/video equipment 
installed in the large meeting room of town hall. This allows for meeting presentations to be 
viewed easily and more efficiently. Many boards and committees have been able to take 
advantage of this technology during their meetings. 

Communication and joint efforts are ongoing with the school department to streamline 
and provide redundancy for the Town and School's infrastructure. With the assistance of the 
School's Technology Department, the Swampscott Senior Center's technology needs are 
maintained. I would like to thank Kevin Kaczynski, School Technology Director and his staff for 
their efforts to work with the Town to keep open lines of communication as we all strive to 
maintain the combined infrastructure. 

I am looking forward to FY2011 and the continued maintenance of the Town's 
Technology needs. 



Respectfully Submitted 
Denise M. Dembkoski 

Treasurer/Collector/Director of Information & Technology 



206 



2010 ANNUAL REPORT OF TOWN COUNSEL 



Town Counsel responded to requests for opinions from Town officials on a wide variety of issues 
and represented the Town in several pending court actions. We advised the Board of Selectmen, Town 
officials and various Town boards and committees on numerous issues, including zoning appeals, 
planning issues, town meeting procedure, amendments to bylaws, real estate and title issues, labor and 
personnel matters, procurement, construction and contract issues. Green Communities designation, real 
estate taxation, the sale of several Town-owned parcels, and various other general municipal matters. 

As always, we strive to provide speedy, accurate and cost effective responses to requests for 
legal services. Town Counsel has represented the Town and its officers in several litigation matters, 
including proceedings in Superior Court and Land Court. We have worked hard to provide effective 
representation of the Town in all of the Town's pending litigation, and we continue to achieve successful 
results on behalf of the Town. 

Town Counsel has continued to work with the Town to reduce municipal legal costs by 
researching many issues of municipal law and mailing memoranda addressing those issues at no charge 
to the Town. For example, in the last twelve months, we have advised the Town with regard to 
amendments to the HIPAA law, the new Open Meeting Law, regionalization of municipal services, 
updates on Green Communities programs, amendments to the Family and Medical Leave Act 
regulations, early retirement incentives, recent statutory amendments to on-premises alcoholic beverages 
licensing, snow and ice removal on municipal premises, and the applicability of public construction bid 
laws to leasing/procuring finished building space, as well as many other timely municipal topics. 

We have attended meetings of various Town boards at the Town's request, and with permission 
of the Board of Selectmen or Town Administrator, to provide advice on the sale of Town-owned 
properties, permit applications, pending litigation and for the purposes of risk management. 

Town Counsel's objective continues to be to provide high quality legal services to the Town in a 
responsive and timely manner at a reasonable cost. 

We extend our appreciation to the Board of Selectmen and Town Administrator for their 
confidence in retaining this firm, and we appreciate the assistance and cooperation we have received on 
all matters from the Board of Selectmen, Town Administrator and other Town boards and personnel. We 
look forward to working with members of the Swampscott town government in the future. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Leonard Kopelman, for the firm 
of Kopelman and Paige, P.C., 
Town Counsel 



417229/SWAM/8888 



207 



TREASURER 

Demise M. Dembkoski 



Treasurer's Cash Statement 

In account with the Town of Swampscott: 

Balance on hand July 1, 2009; 
Receipts and income from all sources: 
Less warrants paid (payroll and vendor): 
Balance on hand June 30, 2010: 

Interest income earned 07/01/09 - 06/30/10: 



$10,001,159 
$68,795,508 
($66,859,337) 
$11,937,329 

$29,215 



TOWN OF SWAMPSCOTT TRUST AND SPECIAL FUNDS 



Balance 
07/01/09 



Deposits 



Interest 



Withdrawals 



Balance 
06/30/10 



Cemetery Gifts & Bequeaths 
Cemetery Perpetual Care 
Library - General Library Trust 
Library - Linscott Trust 
Library - Hussey Trust 
Library - Johnson Trust 
Stabilization Account 
Conservation Fund 
Phillips Medal 
MWRA Program 
Performance Bonds 
War Memorial Fund 

Totals 



$83,489 
$448,378 
$55,325 
$52,563 
$18,272 
$51 
$598,291 
$100,518 
$3,295 
($0) 
$56,248 
$116,691 

$1,533,121 



$12,950 



$50,000 
$611 



$375 



$63,936 



$1,041 
$5,545 
$979 



$575 
$1 

$6,858 
$1,100 
$41 



$1,455 



$18,487 



($3,827) 
($39,017) 
($1,958) 



($14,576) 



($5,150) 
($64,528) 



$84,530 
$466,873 
$52,478 
$14,436 
$16,889 
$52 
$655,150 
$87,653 
$3,337 
($0) 
$56,248 
$113,371 

51,551,015 



Respectfully Submitted, 



Denise M. Dembkoski 
Treasurer 



208 



OFFICE OF VETERANS' SERVICES 

The Office of Veterans' Services was established and is mandated by the Massachusetts 
Legislature under Massachusetts General Law Chapter 115. Veterans' Services is available to provide 
any and all assistance to veterans and their fannilies and to assure that they receive all benefits that they 
may be entitled to. These benefits may be procured through the Massachusetts Department of Veterans 
Services, the United States Veterans Administration, the Social Security Administration as well as any 
other Governmental agency or private organization designed to provide assistance to our veterans and 
their families. All financial aid disbursements from this office through the Massachusetts Department of 
Veterans Services to needy veterans and their families are eligible for a 75% reimbursement from the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts providing the proper monthly application for reimbursement has been 
made in a timely manner. Swampscott receives the maximum reimbursement of 75% for all of the 
financial assistance disbursements from this office. The legislature recently eliminated the "wartime 
service" requirement, which virtually allows all veterans regardless of dates of service to be eligible for aid 
and assistance from the Massachusetts Department of Veterans Services. With a vast majority of our 
active duty, reserve and National Guardsmen and women serving on active duty overseas in support of 
Operation Iraqi Freedom, or Operation Enduring Freedom the numbers of veterans seeking assistance 
has risen accordingly. Currently one of the most sought after benefits are for Military Honors to be 
rendered at a veteran's funeral. It is estimated that Veterans from World War II, Korea, and Vietnam are 
currently passing away at a rate of over 1000 a day in the United States. The local funeral homes are well 
prepared for the request for Military Honors, however, should a problem arise, many families seek 
assistance from this office to ensure their loved one receives the proper "Honors" to which they are 
entitled. 



VETERANS COUNCIL 

The Veterans Affairs Committee was disbanded in favor of a "Veterans Council" for the Town of 
Swampscott. The Council is a 9 member board comprised of the Towns Veteran Service Officer, as well 
as the Commanders and one appointee for each of the 4 Veteran Organizations that are based in 
Swampscott, the Veterans of Foreign Wars, the American Legion, the Marine Corps League and the 
Disabled American Veterans. The Council is charged with maintaining a heightened state of awareness of 
our veterans and current active duty military personnel, through events and memorials. Several members 
of the council having been working for the past few years on a "Veterans Appreciation Day", consisting of 
a parade, static displays and concerts and is scheduled to be held on 4 June 201 1 . 



VETERANS DAY 

The annual observance of Veterans Day began at 1 1:00. A combined Color Guard from the Lynn 
English Marine JROTC represented the Swampscott VFW, American Legion, Marine Corps League and 
the Disabled American Veterans marched into place at Thomson Circle on Monument Avenue. 
Officiating the event was Retired US Navy Captain and Chaplain, Reverend Dean Pedersen who had all 
of the veterans in attendance line up and be recognized and reminded them that is was "their" day. 
Reverend Pedersen also told all in attendance that it is incumbent on ail of us to keep veterans and their 
sacrifices at a heightened state of awareness. Attendees, who included members of the Board of 
Selectmen, Police Chief Ronald Madigan as well as other local officials, honored and prayed for our 
servicemen and women who are currently serving in harms way. Following the service a rifle salute was 
fired by local veterans, followed by taps and a bagpipe rendition of "Going Home" concluding the 
ceremony. As with Memorial Day, this annual ceremony is open to any and all of any age, and all are 
encouraged to attend. 



MEMORIAL DAY 



209 



Once again this year, the Principal of the Stanley School, Ms. Pamela Angelakis, and several of 
the 4'^ grade teachers hiked volunteers from Stanley School two weeks prior to Memorial Day to place 
U.S. flags on the graves of veterans at Swampscott Cemetery. Also assisting with this task in the days 
leading up to Memorial Day is the local troop of Boy Scouts, and volunteers from the various Veteran 
organizations and families here in town. These volunteers, placed well over 1100 flags. Their desire to 
"remember" our veterans in this truly special way is heart warming and truly appreciated. On Memorial 
Day, St. Johns the Baptist Church held it's annual 10:00 AM Mass followed by a wreath laying at the 
flagpole overlooking Swampscott harbor in the lot at St. Johns. The wreath laying serves as a reminder 
and is in honor of, all those who have been lost at sea while serving their country. 

Participants and attendees assembled at the Swampscott cemetery at 12:00 Noon on Memorial 
Day, Color Guards representing the VFW, American Legion, Marine Corps League and the DAV 
combined served as "colors" representatives. Our annual service is officiated by Reverend Dean 
Pedersen. The ceremony was well attended by many members of the Board of Selectmen, State Senator 
Thomas McGee, Police Chief Ronald Madigan, as well as many other town officials and numerous town 
residents. A wreath was placed in honor of all veterans past, present and future. A rifle salute was 
performed by members of the VFW, American Legion and Marine Corps League, taps were sounded and 
a bagpipe performance concluded the ceremony. This annual ceremony is held every Memorial Day and 
is open to all and all are encouraged to attend. 



Respectfully Submitted, 



Jim Schultz 

Veterans Service Officer 



210 



SWAMPSCOTT WAR MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Trustees: Joseph J. Balsama, Duncan H. Maitland, Co-Chairmen 
Jean F. Reardon, Secretary, Thomas H. White, Jr, Douglas B. Maitland, 
Barbara F. Eldridge, Christopher W. Ratley, Hugh M. Shultz 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

A $10,000 scholarship fund was established by Town Meeting on March 26, 
1950 as a perpetual memorial to those who served in the Military Service 
defending our freedom. The first scholarship was awarded in 1951 for $250. In 
1964, Town Meeting appropriated an additional $10,000. Since that time, gifts 
have been received from numerous individuals and organizations in memory of 
relatives and friends. To date, 293 Swampscott High School students have been 
awarded scholarships totaling $122,050. 

DISTRIBUTION OF FUNDS 

The distribution of the War Memorial Scholarship amounts were as follows: 
$1400 (The Ernest Manchin Memorial Scholarship), as well as three $1000 
scholarships, for a total of $4400. 

DETAILS OF CHANGES IN THE FUND BALANCE 

Balance as of 7/1/2009 

Donations 

Interest (7/1/2009-6/30/2010) 
Total 

Scholarships awarded July 1 , 2010 $4400 

Balance as of June 30, 201 

Four scholarships were given to the following graduates in June 2010, 
Elizabeth Drummond, Holly Spliiane, Jennifer Santry and Sara Sverker. 

The trustees wish to thank everyone who made donations to the Swampscott 
War Memorial Scholarship Fund. Through your generosity, we are able to build 
up equity in the fund thereby providing the opportunity for additional income from 
which awards are granted. Each year a few Swampscott High School graduates. 
Who continue on to higher education, will receive some financial assistance. 



211 



Zoning Board of Appeals 



The Swampscott Zoning Board of Appeals had a very productive and successful fiscal year 2010 (July 
2009 - June 2010). During this period Peter Spellios served as the Chairman and Damon Seligson as the 
Vice-Chairman. Helen Kennedy continued her tireless efforts serving as the Board's secretary. The 
membership of the Board remained unchanged from the prior fiscal year and also included Harry Pass, 
Dan Doherty, and Don Hause as regular members with Mark Kornitsky and Andrew Rose remaining as 
Associate Members. The ability to constitute a five member board from seven available members ensured 
that petitioners received a quorum at each hearing which enabled the Board to deliver expedited 
decisions. 

Filings during FY 2010 were lower than in previous years, with some public hearings having only 
one or two petitions, compared to a typical average of 6 to 7 petitions per public hearing. This reduction is 
presumably due to the then economic conditions and an overall decrease in construction. For each 
petition before the Board, the Board took careful measure to evaluate the specific merits of each petition 
individually including the opinions of abutters and concerned citizens, technical information, conformance 
with all applicable regulations/laws from all governmental agencies having jurisdiction, and the overall 
benefit to the Town. 

There were over 40 petitions filed with the Board during FY 2010. FY 2010 was the first full year 
implementing the updated Zoning By-Laws, which were officially adopted at Town Meeting on May 2, 
2009. The new By-Laws endeavored to address some of the ambiguities present in earlier versions, and 
expanded the Board's role in terms of site plan review and the subsequent approval process. The Board 
also implemented a more streamlined procedure by which petitions would be filed including standardizing 
the documentation that would be required, such as plans, property surveys, and technical information. 




Peter A. Spellios, 
Chairman 



{0O003328.DOCX\l} 



212